Christina Skinner

Christina Skinner
The University of Queensland | UQ · School of Biological Sciences

Doctor of Philosophy

About

15
Publications
3,226
Reads
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104
Citations
Citations since 2016
15 Research Items
104 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220102030
20162017201820192020202120220102030
Additional affiliations
July 2020 - May 2022
Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Position
  • Postdoctoral Fellow
April 2016 - June 2020
Newcastle University
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (15)
Article
Full-text available
Coral reefs were traditionally perceived as productive hot spots in oligotrophic waters. While modern evidence indicates that many coral reef food webs are heavily subsidized by planktonic production, the pathways through which this occurs remain unresolved. We used the analytical power of carbon isotope analysis of essential amino acids to disting...
Article
Full-text available
Coral reef ecosystems are exceptionally complex with a myriad of trophic pathways and consumer relationships. The application of stable isotopes (SIs) offers numerous advantages over traditional methods towards understanding these intricate systems. We summarize current knowledge derived from the rapidly increasing SI literature base and identify p...
Article
Full-text available
Fish have one of the highest occurrences of individual specialization in trophic strategies among Eukaryotes. Yet, few studies characterize this variation during trophic niche analysis, limiting our understanding of aquatic food web dynamics. Stable isotope analysis (SIA) with advanced Bayesian statistics is one way to incorporate this individual t...
Article
Full-text available
Reef fish may switch feeding strategies due to fluctuations in resource availability or through ontogeny. A number of studies have explored these trophodynamics using carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) stable isotopes, but additional tracers such as sulfur isotopes (δ34S) show strong potential in systems, where δ13C and δ15N results are ambiguous. W...
Article
Full-text available
Predators on coral reefs play an important ecological role structuring reef fish communities and are important fishery targets. It is thought that reef predator assemblages increase in density and diversity from inner lagoonal to outer edge reefs. Oceanic atolls may differ though, as nutrients are available throughout. Reef predator populations are...
Article
Full-text available
The application of stable isotope analysis (SIA) is increasing in elasmobranch trophic ecology, but inconsistency remains in terms of the tissue pre-treatment methods chosen to remove biases introduced by lipids and urea. SIA of a range of non-lethally extracted tissues from a diverse group of elasmobranchs, including mesopredators, is increasing,...
Article
Full-text available
Sympatric species may partition resources to reduce competition and facilitate co‐existence. While spatial variation and specialization in feeding strategies may be prevalent among large marine predators, studies have focussed on sharks, birds, and marine mammals. We consider for the first time the isotopic niche partitioning of co‐occurring, teleo...
Article
Full-text available
1)Coral reef food webs are complex, vary spatially and remain poorly understood. Certain large predators, notably sharks, are subsidised by pelagic production on outer reef slopes, but how widespread this dependence is across all teleost fishery target species and within atolls is unclear. 2)North Malé Atoll (Maldives) includes oceanic barrier as w...
Article
The grazing behaviour of two Caribbean parrotfish, a fished species, the stoplight parrotfish Sparisoma viride and a non‐fished species, the striped parrotfish Scarus iseri, were studied in the presence (fished site) and absence (marine reserve) of chronic spearfishing activity. Diurnal feeding periodicity did not differ between the sites in either...
Article
Full-text available
Although many coral reefs have shifted from coral-to-algal dominance, the consequence of such a transition for coral–algal interactions and their underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. At the microscale, it is unclear how diffusive boundary layers (DBLs) and surface oxygen concentrations at the coral–algal interface vary with algal competi...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This PhD project is a comprehensive study of coral reef predator trophodynamics. The overall aims of this research were, across an oceanic atoll: 1) to investigate predator distributions and identify the drivers of their community structure; 2) to compare inter- and intra-specific patterns of their resource use; 3) to identify the origin of the carbon supporting their biomass.