Christina Papageorgopoulou

Christina Papageorgopoulou
Democritus University of Thrace | DUTH · Department of History and Ethnology Laboratory of Physical Anthropology

PhD

About

60
Publications
25,671
Reads
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868
Citations
Additional affiliations
April 2012 - present
Democritus University of Thrace
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
March 2010 - April 2012
Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Palaeo- und Populationsgenetik des Frühneolithikums zwischen Anatolien und Mitteleuropa
January 2006 - April 2010
University of Zurich
Position
  • Research Assistant

Publications

Publications (60)
Article
Full-text available
The aim of the study is to investigate mitochondrial diversity in Neolithic Greece and its relation to hunter-gatherers and farmers who populated the Danubian Neolithic expansion axis. We sequenced 42 mitochondrial palaeogenomes from Greece and analysed them together with European set of 328 mtDNA sequences dating from the Early to the Final Neolit...
Article
Full-text available
The precise genetic origins of the first Neolithic farming populations in Europe and Southwest Asia, as well as the processes and the timing of their differentiation, remain largely unknown. Demogenomic modeling of high-quality ancient genomes reveals that the early farmers of Anatolia and Europe emerged from a multiphase mixing of a Southwest Asia...
Article
Objective The study presents seven new cases of trepanations on four individuals from the ancient Greek colony of Akanthos (5th - 1st c. BC) and juxtaposes the paleopathological observations with the Hippocratic treatises. Materials A meta-analysis of 42 published trepanations on 27 individuals from Greece. Methods Trepanations from Akanthos were...
Article
Full-text available
The Cycladic, the Minoan, and the Helladic (Mycenaean) cultures define the Bronze Age (BA) of Greece. Urbanism, complex social structures, craft and agricultural specialization, and the earliest forms of writing characterize this iconic period. We sequenced six Early to Middle BA whole genomes, along with 11 mitochondrial genomes, sampled from the...
Article
Stature is a key concept in the study of human past since along with the biological information it provides overall trends about the standards of living. However, stature data on historic and prehistoric populations are still limited, especially for key temporospatial settings of antiquity such as ancient Greece. We collected osteometric data from...
Preprint
Full-text available
While the Neolithic expansion in Europe is well described archaeologically, the genetic origins of European first farmers and their affinities with local hunter-gatherers (HGs) remain unclear. To infer the demographic history of these populations, the genomes of 15 ancient individuals located between Western Anatolia and Southern Germany were seque...
Article
Full-text available
The recovery and analysis of ancient DNA and protein from archaeological bone is time-consuming and expensive to carry out, while it involves the partial or complete destruction of valuable or rare specimens. The fields of palaeogenetic and palaeoproteomic research would benefit greatly from techniques that can assess the molecular quality prior to...
Poster
https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.1002/ajpa.24023
Article
Artificial mummification has been used since antiquity and is best known from ancient Egypt. Despite ancient Egyptian mummies being studied for several decades, the mummification techniques of that time are not well understood. Modern mummification experiments involving animal and human tissues have contributed additional insights relevant to a bro...
Article
The present study evaluates the precision and accuracy of photogrammetric 3D modeling of human crania in landmark acquisition and explores the limitations of combining datasets acquired by different observers and different measurement methods. Our working sample comprises 50 adult human crania, which were modeled with 3D photogrammetry. 3D coordina...
Article
Full-text available
Accurate sexing methods are of great importance in forensic anthropology since sex assessment is among the principal tasks when examining human skeletal remains. The present study explores a novel approach in assessing the most accurate metric traits of the human cranium for sex estimation based on 80 ectocranial landmarks from 176 modern individua...
Article
Full-text available
The retrieval of ancient DNA from osteological material provides direct evidence of human genetic diversity in the past. Ancient DNA samples are often used to investigate whether there was population continuity in the settlement history of an area. Methods based on the serial coalescent algorithm have been developed to test whether the population c...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this paper is to investigate ageing changes in craniofacial region in both sexes and evaluate whether these shape changes are substantial to achieve age discrimination of samples used in anthropological analyses. The study sample consisted of 157 crania of known sex and age (81 males and 76 females) belonging to individuals who lived in...
Article
Full-text available
The aim of this paper is to evaluate and quantify cranium asymmetry, sexual differences in the set of individual asymmetry scores, and the relationship between fluctuating asymmetry and age, in a modern Greek population sample. In addition, we test for the developmental origins of health and disease hypothesis by assessing the correlation between f...
Article
Full-text available
Jörg Jenatsch, a leading freedom fighter during the Thirty Year's War in Graubünden, Switzerland, was assassinated on carnival 1639. Jenatsch's controversial biography and the unclear circumstances of his death inspired the formation of various legends, novels and films. In 1959, a skeleton discovered in the cathedral of Chur with remains of wealth...
Article
Full-text available
Farming and sedentism first appeared in southwestern Asia during the early Holocene and later spread to neighboring regions, including Europe, along multiple dispersal routes. Conspicuous uncertainties remain about the relative roles of migration, cultural diffusion, and admixture with local foragers in the early Neolithization of Europe. Here we p...
Article
Many studies have been concerned with the ancient Egyptian mummification method; nevertheless, little effort has been made to explore it experimentally. The goal of this study is to apply evidence-based diagnostic criteria and state-of-the art methodology in order to improve knowledge on soft tissues preservation and postmortem alterations. Two hum...
Article
Full-text available
In 2007, the baby woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) named Lyuba was found frozen in the Siberian tundra permafrost along the Yuribey River. She was proclaimed the best-preserved mammoth discovery. As part of the endoscopic examination of Lyuba, tissue samples of hair, muscle, and internal organs were taken. The sectioned biopsies were stained...
Article
Full-text available
Farming and sedentism first appear in southwest Asia during the early Holocene and later spread to neighboring regions, including Europe, along multiple dispersal routes. Conspicuous uncertainties remain about the relative roles of migration, cultural diffusion and admixture with local foragers in the early Neolithisation of Europe. Here we present...
Article
Full-text available
Mummified human tissues are of great interest in forensics and biomolecular archaeology. The aim of this study was to analyse post mortem DNA alterations in soft tissues in order to improve our knowledge of the patterns of DNA degradation that occur during salt mummification. In this study, the lower limb of a female human donor was amputated withi...
Article
Full-text available
To assess changes in different tissues during the process of artificial mummification by natron using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and to translate the results to image interpretation in paleoradiological studies of ancient mummies. A human lower limb (LL) was amputated from a female donor 24 h post-mortem and mumm...
Article
Full-text available
Recently, modern cross-sectional imaging techniques such as multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) have pioneered post mortem investigations, especially in forensic medicine. Such approaches can also be used to investigate bones non-invasively for anthropological purposes. Long bones are often examined in forensic cases because they are frequent...
Article
Full-text available
In 1951 peat cutters unearthed the bog body of an adult female dating from the Roman period (AD 78-233) in the ‘Damsel’s Bog’ northwest of the villages of Aalden and Zweeloo (province of Drenthe, the Netherlands, fig. 1). The degree of the body’s preservation has now been assessed using atomic force microscopy imaging (AFM) and histology. AFM imag...
Article
The occurrence of transverse radiopaque lines in long bones-Harris lines (HLs)-is correlated with episodes of temporary arrest of longitudinal growth and has been used as an indicator of health and nutritional status of modern and historical populations. However, the interpretation of HLs as a stress indicator remains debatable. The aim of this art...
Article
Full-text available
Body mass (BM) and furthermore body mass index (BMI) are well-known proxies used in medicine as a diagnostic tool to identify weight problems, health risks, and to assess biological standards of living within populations. The prediction of body mass (BM) from skeletal material is still challenging, although many studies have indicated that BM can b...
Article
The confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) has become an essential tool for a wide range of biological and clinical studies and imaging applications. The major imaging modes of the CLSM include single and serial optical sections from thick specimens (100 µm), multiple wavelength images and three-dimensional reconstruction. Such images provide me...
Article
Cerebral tissues from archaeological human remains are extremely rare findings. Hereby, we report a multidisciplinary study of a unique case of a left cerebral hemisphere from a 13th century AD child, found in north-western France. The cerebral tissue-reduced by ca. 80% of its original weight-had been fixed in formalin since its discovery. However,...
Article
Full-text available
Pelvic fractures are considered to be uncommon and difficult to treat, even in the modern medical literature. Serious and eventually life-threatening associated injuries may occur, requiring emergency abdominal, vascular or neurologic surgery. Pelvic fractures can also be managed non-operatively; however, a considerable dispute exists on the suitab...
Article
Full-text available
The partially mummified remains of a high-status female (ca. 1700 BP, Thessaloniki, Greece) were found inside a Roman-type marble sarcophagus containing a lead coffin. The individual was positioned on a wooden pallet, wrapped in bandages, and covered with a gold-embroidered purple silk cloth. Besides the clothes, remnants of soft tissue as well as...
Article
Full-text available
The paper presents a different approach for the calculation of age estimation based on observation of the cranial suture closure. Instead of a linear regression, multivariate statistics and specifically detrended correspondence analysis (dCA) is applied to the data. Two series of known sex and age were used, whereas the new approach was also applie...
Article
Arrest in long bone growth and the subsequent resumption of growth may be visible as radiopaque transverse lines in radiographs (Harris lines, HL; Harris, HA. 1933. Bone growth in health and disease. London: Oxford University Press). The assessment of individual age at occurrence of such lines, as part of paleopathological skeletal studies, is time...

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
The research project proposes an innovative methodology for the digital representation of human biographies. We use state-of-the-art technologies for the study and documentation of anthropological material from the archeological excavations of METRO, Thessaloniki, and develop innovative applications for the dissemination of results. By applying ancient DNA, stable isotopes, and novel imaging technologies, we reconstruct the health, nutrition, and demographics of the city's inhabitants. At the same time, we develop advanced visualizations with augmented (AR) and virtual (VR) reality applications, and alternative themed walks.
Project
The research started 25 ago with the excavation of the Cyclops Cave at Youra and continued with the excavation of Maroulas site in Kythnos, the first Mesolithic settlement in Greece. A second settlement was excavated at Kerame 1 in Ikaria. In parallel excavation in Sarakenos Cave revealed a Mesolithic Horizon dated from 10th to 7th mill. BC. The project the last ten years continued with the location of 4 Μesolithic sites in Kythnos, 5 sites in Ikaria. Surface surveys located Mesolithic sites in Fournoi, Naxos, Sikinos and Chalki (Dodecanese). Part of the project is the study of maritime contacts of Mesolithic Aegeans with populations of Cyprus, S. Anatolia and Near East. Sponsored by INSTAP. After the recent ascertainment that in the South-East part of Cyprus were found sites with the same stone industry, exactly the same as that of the Mesolithic Aegean, the project aims at searching of phylogenetic relations through DNA analyses of anthropological samples from the Aegean and the Near East that are in progress. A.Sampson, J. K. Kozlowski, M. Kaczanowska, Papageorgopoulou, G. Kontopoulos