Christina Cross

Christina Cross
Harvard University | Harvard · Department of Sociology

Doctor of Philosophy

About

14
Publications
17,527
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217
Citations
Citations since 2016
14 Research Items
217 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080

Publications

Publications (14)
Article
Full-text available
This study examined the prevalence of nonresident social fathering among African American youth from single‐mother families and their reports of subjective closeness, frequency of contact, and financial support from social fathers during young adulthood. Research on African American families has overwhelmingly focused on single motherhood and the m...
Article
Full-text available
In the field of family science and in the broader family policy discourse, debate is ongoing about the importance of family structure for child outcomes. Missing from this debate is a full integration of how the foundational pillars of White supremacy, namely structural racism and heteropatriarchy, impact both family formation and child outcomes, e...
Article
Objective: This study examined racial and ethnic differences in the receipt and provision of instrumental family support. Background: Extended families provide significant levels of emotional and instrumental support across the life course. Despite their importance, extended family relationships and the assistance they provide are largely neglec...
Article
Objective This study examined the correlates of involvement in extended family social support networks among African Americans. Background Previous literature has documented the importance of informal social support from extended family members for the African American population. Most research has investigated black-white differences in network i...
Preprint
Full-text available
Using a nationally representative sample of African American adolescents from the National Survey of American Life Adolescent supplement (NSAL-A), this study examines intraracial diversity in two key dimensions of family organization-family structure and family integration-and assesses their relationship with youths' educational performance, namely...
Article
Using data from the National Survey of American Life, we investigated the social and demographic correlates of fictive kin network involvement among African Americans, Black Caribbeans, and non-Latino Whites. Specifically, we examined the factors shaping whether respondents have fictive kin, the number of fictive present kin in their networks, and...
Article
Objective This study tested two hypotheses that have been posited to account for racial/ethnic differences in the association between family structure and children's education. Background Research has shown that children raised by both biological parents fare better academically than children raised in any other family structure. However, there ha...
Preprint
Full-text available
Abstract: While an extensive literature has shown that children raised by both biological parents fare better academically than children raised in any other family structure, there has been little research to explain an important finding: living apart from a biological parent is less negatively consequential for racial/ethnic minority children than...
Article
Full-text available
Using data from the 1996–2008 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation and the 2009–2016 American Community Survey, we examine trends in U.S. children living in shared households (living with adults beyond their nuclear (parent/parent’s partner/sibling) family). We find that although the share of children who lived in a shared house...
Article
Full-text available
Although family social support has been linked to numerous psychological, behavioral, and academic outcomes for Black adolescents, little research investigates the family support networks of these youths. Using nationally representative data from the National Survey of American Life Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A), this study examines the family soc...
Article
Full-text available
More than one in five U.S. adolescents resides in a household where neither parent holds a postsecondary degree but at least one parent spent some time in college. We consider how a distinctive combination of cultural and economic resources in college leaver families enables or constrains young adults’ educational pathways. Greater resources in col...
Article
This study uses data from the National Survey of American Life Re-Interview to examine the types and frequency of instrumental support that African Americans exchange with extended family members as well as the demographic and family correlates of these exchanges. Four types of instrumental support are examined: transportation assistance, help with...
Article
Full-text available
This study uses nationally representative longitudinal data from the Panel Study of Income Dynamics, to examine the prevalence and predictors of extended family households among children in the United States and to explore variation by race/ethnicity and socio-economic status (SES). Findings suggest that extended family households are a common livi...
Article
Full-text available
This study examines black adolescents’ reports of the most helpful types of social support that they receive from and provide to family members, and whether family support exchanges vary by ethnicity (African American vs. Black Caribbean) and gender. Data for this study are from the National Survey of American Life Adolescent Supplement (NSAL-A), a...

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