Christina Cheung

Christina Cheung
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle · Département Homme & Environnement

Doctor of Philosophy

About

28
Publications
9,162
Reads
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201
Citations
Citations since 2016
27 Research Items
196 Citations
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201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
201620172018201920202021202201020304050
Additional affiliations
July 2021 - present
Vrije Universiteit Brussel
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
September 2011 - December 2015
October 2008 - September 2009
University of Oxford
Field of study
  • Archaeological Science
October 2005 - July 2008
The University of York
Field of study
  • Archaeology/ History

Publications

Publications (28)
Preprint
Full-text available
The Arctic is among the most climatically sensitive environments on Earth, and the disappearance of multiyear sea-ice in the Arctic Ocean is predicted within decades. As apex predators, polar bears are sentinel species for addressing the impact of environmental variability on Arctic marine ecosystems. By integrating genomics, isotopic analysis, mor...
Article
Full-text available
Human populations have been shaped by catastrophes that may have left long-lasting signatures in their genomes. One notable example is the second plague pandemic that entered Europe in ca. 1,347 CE and repeatedly returned for over 300 years, with typical village and town mortality estimated at 10%–40%.¹ It is assumed that this high mortality affect...
Article
Full-text available
Rationale: The last decade has seen a dramatic increase in the application of serial sampling of human dentine in archaeology. Rapid development in the field has provided many improvements in the methodology, both in terms of time resolution, as well as the ability to integrate more isotope systems in the analysis. This study provides a comparison...
Article
Full-text available
A clear understanding of past weaning practices can provide invaluable insights into social issues such as infant care, fertility rate, and demographic patterns in past societies. This study presents the first archeological research employing compound specific isotope analysis (CSIA) for the reconstruction of past weaning practices. Weaning practic...
Poster
Full-text available
The application of incremental enamel sampling on human dental enamel allows researchers to observe how isotopic values may vary over an individual’s early life. For archaeologists, this means we can observe how an individual’s diet and geographical mobility may have changed over time. Currently, incremental isotope studies on human enamel primaril...
Article
Full-text available
Theory and field studies suggest that long-term individual foraging site fidelity (IFSF) may be an important adaptation to competition from increasing population. However, the driving mechanisms and extent of long-term IFSF in wild populations of long-lived, migratory animals has been logistically difficult to study, with only a few confirmed insta...
Article
Full-text available
Cremated human remains are commonly found in the archaeological records, especially in Europe during the Metal Ages and the Roman period. Due to the high temperatures reached during cremation (up to 1000°C), most biological information locked in the isotopic composition of different tissues is heavily altered or even destroyed. The recent demonstra...
Article
Full-text available
This paper collates previously published data from incremental isotopic studies performed on faunal remains found within the modern boundaries of the United Kingdom (UK). The dataset represents a complete collection of zooarchaeological incremental data from the UK, consisting of 1,092 data points, obtained from 152 faunal specimens from 20 archaeo...
Article
Full-text available
Using stable isotope mixing models (SIMMs) to quantify past diets is becoming increasingly common in archaeology. This study highlights important field-specific difficulties encountered by archaeologists in reconstructing palaeodiets using SIMMs. Focusing on the data acquisition stage, we discuss several issues that could confound dietary quantific...
Article
Full-text available
Your dentist can tell a lot about your health and daily habits just by looking at your teeth. But did you know that archaeological scientists have discovered that there is a lot more information hidden in teeth? We can study the chemical composition of teeth and can find out what types of food a person ate, and even where that food was growing. Whe...
Article
Full-text available
In this study we describe some of the earliest human bone collagen δ¹³C and δ¹⁵N values from the Lingnan region in Southeast Asia. The samples (n = 10) derive from skeletal remains recovered from the Tung Wan Tsai site in Hong Kong and date to the Late Neolithic Period (ca. 2200–1500 BC). Our results show that the earliest inhabitants of Hong Kong...
Article
Full-text available
Palaeodietary reconstruction using stable isotope analysis is becoming increasingly common, as is the practice of using mixing models to quantify ancient dietary compositions. However, many archaeologists may be unaware of the complexities and pitfalls of stable isotope mixing models (SIMMs). This study serves to provide an overview of the basic pr...
Article
This study investigates the relationship between monumental funerary structures, social organizations, and diets in Middle Neolithic France. Focusing on the Cerny culture based in the Paris Basin region, we analysed and compared bone collagen stable carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur isotope values of 113 individuals from three different types of Cerny c...
Article
Full-text available
Stable isotope analysis is routinely used in archaeology to answer questions related to past diets. As the technique matures, data from archaeological sites have been generated at an exponential rate over the past several decades, thus provided an invaluable opportunity to examine past dietary practices and subsistence economies in much larger geog...
Article
Full-text available
We report here on stable carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur isotope values from bone collagen of human (n = 20) and faunal (n = 11) remains from the Early Neolithic site of Ganj Dareh, Iran, dating to ca. 10,100 cal. BP. Our focus explores how isotope values of human bone vary by age and sex, and evaluates dietary practices at this site. It also provides...
Article
The decline of passenger pigeons (Ectopistes migratorius) during the late nineteenth century continues to draw substantial public and scientific attention as perhaps the most (in-)famous extinction event in North America's recent history. While humans undeniably caused the extinction, the relative importance of indirect (habitat destruction) versus...
Article
Full-text available
Prior to the introduction of wheat and barley from Central Asia during the Neolithic period, northern Chinese agricultural groups subsisted heavily on millet. Despite being the focus of many decades of intensive interest and research, the exact route(s), date(s), and mechanisms of the spread and adoption of wheat and barley into the existing well-e...
Conference Paper
Mobility patterns in the South Pacific has always been of great interest to archaeologists. Sigatoka, a multi-period archaeological site located on Vitu Levu (the Republic of Fiji), is one of the oldest archaeological sites in the south Pacific region, and thus is long regarded as a key site to understand the peopling of Remote Oceania. Using stron...
Article
One of the most important archaeological sites in Fiji is located in the Sigatoka Sand Dunes National Park, on the southwest coast of Viti Levu. Numerous excavation projects at Sigatoka since the 1960s have revealed multiple episodes of human occupation, including burials, and a well-defined cemetery complex. This paper uses strontium isotope analy...
Article
This paper uses a multi-isotope approach (C, N, S) to explore the social dynamics of early Bronze Age China, focusing on communities within the Central China Plain. Building upon recent research on Yinxu, the last capital of the Shang Dynasty (Cheung et al., 2017a, 2017b), we obtained 49 samples from six contemporaneous sites both within and outsid...
Article
Full-text available
The site known as Yinxu (present-day Anyang, Henan, China) is believed to be the last capital of China’s first historical dynasty, Shang (ca. 1600–1046 BC). We use stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analysis of human bone collagen to reconstruct the dietary practices of 59 humans from the site Xin’anzhuang (XAZ), a residential neighborhood in Yinxu...
Article
The practice of ritual killing, using both human and animal subjects, was prevalent in early Bronze Age China. This study addresses one key archaeological question that concerns the social roles and geographical origins of these human victims. Although oracle bone inscriptions from the site of Yinxu mentioned that many of these victims were war cap...
Article
This study uses stable isotope analyses (δ13C and δ15N) of human bone collagen to reconstruct the diet of three Romano-British (first to early fifth century AD) populations from Gloucestershire in South West England. Gloucestershire was an important part of Roman Britain with two major administrative centres at Gloucester (Glevum) and Cirencester (...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
Hi, i am trying to compare the dietary compositions of two groups, using just 2 isotopes (d13C, and d15N), should be very straightforward. I noticed that when I run the groups individually I get very different results than running them together. Is one way fundamentally better than the other? Thanks in advance!

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