Christie Scollon

Christie Scollon
Western Washington University | WWU · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

50
Publications
35,462
Reads
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5,630
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
July 2008 - present
Singapore Management University
Position
  • Head of Faculty
August 2004 - May 2008
Texas Christian University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (50)
Article
Full-text available
widespread lay theory in the United States suggests that the best way to make decisions is to follow who you “really are”, referred to as the “true-self-as-guide” (TSAG) lay theory of decision making. In this paper, we explore whether people from four less-WEIRD (i.e., Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic) countries also explicit...
Chapter
In this chapter we address how cross-cultural comparisons can magnify response biases and provide guidelines for selecting a survey methodology which minimizes these confounds. The tendency for response biases to be compounded by cross-cultural comparison is discussed in terms of momentary and retrospective reporting and organized via Robinson and...
Article
Full-text available
Most prior research on culture and the dynamics of social support has focused on the emotional outcomes for social support recipients. Though an existing body of research has identified cross-cultural differences in the emotional correlates of receiving different types of social support, researchers have seldom examined possible cultural difference...
Article
This experimental study extends the geographical focus of empirical investigations of what makes life good to Ghana, West Africa. Data were collected from a sample of 189 Ghanaian college students (19–49 years old). A 2 (income: high vs. low) × 2 (happiness: high vs. low) × 2 (meaning: high vs. low) experimental design was used to investigate facto...
Article
To what extent do people view self-control as central to achieving a healthy, high-quality life? While scientific evidence strongly supports the notion that self-control is associated with successful adaptation and optimal functioning, we examine whether individuals connect this trait with positive outcomes. In Study 1, participants rated the likel...
Article
Subjective well-being (SWB) is what most people refer to as happiness. It is people's subjective sense that life is going well. Many factors influence SWB, and culture is of course an important one. The present article describes the cultural differences in SWB, beginning with the desirability of happiness around the world. Next, the authors discuss...
Conference Paper
Sensing social media for trends and events has become possible as increasing number of users rely on social media to share information. In the event of a major disaster or social event, one can therefore study the event quickly by gathering and analyzing social media data. One can also design appropriate responses such as allocating resources to th...
Article
There are individual and cultural differences in how memories of our emotions are cognitively represented. This article examines the cognitive representation of emotions in different cultures, as a result of emotional (in)consistency in different cultures. Using a continuous semantic priming task, we showed in two studies that individuals who were...
Article
Full-text available
According to the hedonic treadmill model, good and bad events temporarily affect happiness, but people quickly adapt back to hedonic neutrality. The theory, which has gained widespread acceptance in recent years, implies that individual and societal efforts to increase happiness are doomed to failure. The recent empirical work outlined here indicat...
Article
Is a life characterized by material success one that will be seen favorably by others? In two studies, we explored the effect of a target person’s material success on perceptions of the target’s life quality. Participants viewed a survey ostensibly completed by another person—which experimentally varied the target’s material success in the form of...
Article
Cross-cultural comparisons of subjective emotional experience are common, and virtually any comparison of nations or different ethnic groups is bound to yield some differences and some similarities. While nobody doubts the considerable intercultural variability in subjective or self-reports of emotion, more attention needs to be given to when and w...
Article
Full-text available
We examined factors related to attitudes toward marriage and the importance of having children in both the US and Singapore. Path analysis indicated that life dissatisfaction leads to materialism, and both of these factors lead to favorable attitudes toward marriage, which leads to greater desire for children. Further analysis indicated this model...
Chapter
Full-text available
At the heart of social progress is the human capacity to notice a discrepancy between how things are and how they might be. Certainly, such progress requires more than simply this realization. It requires the belief that change is possible and right. It requires social cooperation and work by groups for the common good. But these activities would n...
Chapter
Full-text available
The experience-sampling (ESM) technique is a method in which recording of feelings and activities is done on-line at the moment, either at randomly selected moments or at predetermined times. This method has the advantage of being able to not only assess people’s general feelings, but to link feelings with situations, times of day, and other circum...
Chapter
Full-text available
Participants included 46 European American, 33 Asian American, 91 Japanese, 160 Indian, and 80 Hispanic students (N = 416). Discrete emotions, as well as pleasant and unpleasant emotions, were assessed: (a) with global self-report measures, (b) using an experience-sampling method for 1 week, and (c) by asking participants to recall their emotions f...
Article
Full-text available
According to Affect Valuation Theory (Tsai etal. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 54, 1031–1039), culture influences how people want to feel (ideal affect). Integrating Affect Valuation Theory with the Time-sequential Framework of Subjective Well-being (Kim-Prieto etal. Journal of Happiness Studies, 6, 261–300), we proposed that cultur...
Article
Full-text available
In 3 studies, the authors found support for the value-congruence model that accounts for cultural variations in memory for emotional experiences. In Study 1, the authors found that in the made-in-the-U.S. scenario condition, European Americans were more accurate than were Asian Americans in their retrospective frequency judgments of emotions. Howev...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examined individual differences in change in extraversion, neuroticism, and work and relationship satisfaction. Of particular interest were the correlations between changes. Data were from the Victorian Quality of Life Panel Study (B. Headey & A. Wearing, 1989, 1992), in which an overall 1,130 individuals participated (ages 16 to...
Article
Full-text available
As employers respond to intensive global competition through the deregulation of labor, job insecurity has become a widespread problem. It has been shown to have significant health impacts in a growing number of workers, but less is known about its social distribution, the mechanisms through which it may act, and the moderating effects of gender, s...
Article
Full-text available
The present study examined whether the relation between pleasant and unpleasant emotion varies across cultures and level of analysis (i.e., within-person vs. between-person). A total of 386 participants included European Americans, Asian Americans, Japanese, Indian, and Hispanic students. Momentary mood was assessed up to 7 times daily for one week...
Article
Full-text available
Three studies examined folk concepts of the good life. Participantsrated the desirability and moral goodness of a life as a function of thehappiness, meaning, and effort experienced. Happiness and meaning weresolid predictors of the good life, replicating King and Napa (1998).Study 1 (N = 381) included wealth as an additional factor. Resultsshowed...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined cross-situational consistency of affective experiences using an experience-sampling method in Japan, India, and the United States. Participants recorded their moods and situations when signaled at random moments for 7 days. The authors examined relative (interindividual) consistency and absolute (within-person) consistency. They...
Article
Subjective well-being, or what is popularly often called “happiness,” has been of intense interest throughout human history. We review research showing that it is not a single factor, but that subjective well-being is composed of a number of separable although somewhat related variables. For example, positive feelings, negative feelings, and life s...
Article
When individuals choose future activities on the basis of their past experiences, what guides those choices? The present study compared students' predicted, on-line, and remembered spring-break experiences, as well as the influence of these factors on students' desire to take a similar vacation in the future. Predicted and remembered experiences we...
Article
Full-text available
The experience-sampling (ESM) technique is a method in which record- ing of feelings and activities is done on-line at the moment, either at randomly selected moments or at predetermined times. This method has the advantage of being able to not only assess people's general feelings, but to link feelings with situations, times of day, and other circ...
Article
The strengths and weaknesses of personality psychology are examined. Major strengths of the field include its breadth and integrative quality, and sophistication in methodology and analytic strategies. However, intellectual isolation stands as a potential threat to the vitality of personality, and a heavy reliance on single-time self-report measure...
Article
Eighty-seven parents of children with Down Syndrome (DS; 63 women, 24 men) wrote narratives about finding out that their child had DS and completed questionnaire measures of subjective well-being (SWB) and stress-related growth and completed the Sentence Completion Test as a measure of ego development. Forty-two of these individuals participated in...
Article
The present study investigated how reports of satisfaction with specific versus global domains can be used to assess a disposition towards positivity in subjective well-being reports. College students from 41 societies (N = 7167) completed measures of life satisfaction and ratings of global and specific aspects of their lives. For example, particip...
Article
Full-text available
As employers respond to intensive global competition through the deregulation of labor, job insecurity has become a widespread problem. It has been shown to have significant health impacts in a growing number of workers, but less is known about its social distribution, the mechanisms through which it may act, and the moderating effects of gender, s...
Article
Full-text available
Two studies examined folk concepts of the good life. Samples of college students (N = 104) and community adults (N = 264) were shown a career survey ostensibly completed by a person rating his or her occupation. After reading the survey, participants judged the desirability and moral goodness of the respondent's life, as a function of the amount of...
Article
Full-text available
Subjective well-being is a broad term that encompasses the various ways people evaluate their lives, including concepts such as life satisfaction, pleasant emotions, satisfaction with domains such as work and health, feelings of fulfillment and meaning, and low levels of unpleasant emotions. Subjective well-being (SWB) is one component of the good...

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