Christie Brien

Christie Brien
Carleton University; University of Ottawa · Linguistics

PhD

About

13
Publications
2,472
Reads
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63
Citations
Introduction
Hello! I currently divide my time 3 ways: 1) as a Contract Instructor of Linguistics at Carleton University, 2) as Research and Knowledge Mobilization Coordinator of the University of Ottawa Living Lab at the Canada Science and Technology Museum, and 3) completing a great post-doctoral project aiming to improve the accessibility of information and communication in the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts for adults with communication difficulties. In my free time (haha), running keeps me sane.
Additional affiliations
January 2020 - present
Carleton University
Position
  • Instructor
Description
  • Teaching second-year Phonetics course
January 2017 - December 2019
McGill University; Université de Montréal
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2015 - December 2016
University of Ottawa
Position
  • Professor
Description
  • LIN1310 LIN1320 LIN2352 LIN3350
Education
September 2008 - October 2013
University of Ottawa
Field of study
  • Linguistics - Psycholinguistics and Neurolinguistics

Publications

Publications (13)
Research
Full-text available
Abstract of paper forthcoming. Paper investigates inflectional processing of speakers with Down syndrome compared to typically-developed speakers. Results can be accounted for by the Declarative/Procedural Model of language processing.
Poster
Full-text available
Results of a survey asking what people with communication difficulties want in order to overcome real-world linguistic obstacles in a controlled public environment such as a mall or museum.
Preprint
This paper discusses polysemous lexemes surfacing as either a verb or noun with no alteration of form to indicate the difference. Contrary to lexemes which surface with overt affixation to indicate a derived shift of function, the forms discussed in this paper depend on context to disambiguate the intended meaning. For example, “wink” surfaces as e...
Poster
Full-text available
This pilot project proposes to help close the void in older bilingual research by investigating whether or not the same metalinguistic awareness found for young bilinguals is being utilized by bilinguals who are over 50 years old.
Article
In this paper we integrate and reinterpret new data from a set of experiments in our lab in order to tease apart many of the factors thought to influence bilingual processing. Specifically we combine data from studies investigating age of immersion (AoI), manner of acquisition (MoA), proficiency and context of bilingualism to (1) investigate the or...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In this paper we integrate and reinterpret new data from a set of experiments in our lab in order to tease apart many of the factors thought to influence bilingual processing. Specifically we combine data from studies investigating age of immersion (AoI), manner of acquisition (MoA), proficiency and context of bilingualism to (1) investigate the or...
Poster
Full-text available
This poster presents initial ERP research investigating the influence of proficiency and AoA on bilingual speakers’ increased metalinguistic awareness in homonym processing.
Conference Paper
Full-text available
While many Canadians speak both official languages, the ways in which bilinguals acquire their two languages varies greatly from place to place, and even from individual to individual. The current study investigates how bilinguals represent their two lexical systems mentally, and in particular, how this organization is affected by the manner in whi...
Article
Full-text available
This study investigates the role of age of acquisition (AoA) on the bilingual mental lexicon. Four groups of participants were tested: (i) English native speakers with minimal exposure to French; (ii) late English–French bilinguals; (iii) early English–French bilinguals; and (iv) simultaneous English–French bilinguals. We used a masked priming para...
Chapter
Full-text available
This chapter reviews past and current contributions from event-related brain potential (ERP) research to the field of L2 processing. ERPs are able to measure cognitive brain processes at a very fine-grained temporal resolution and allow for determining when linguistic processes are occurring. The technique allows for investigations of whether L1 an...
Poster
Full-text available
This research poster presents initial ERP results investigating the effects of acquiring L2 French on the disambiguation of homonyms in English as L1.
Article
Full-text available
The processing of homonyms is complex considering homonyms have many lexical properties. For instance, train contains semantic (a locomotive/to instruct) and syntactic (noun/verb) properties, each affecting interpretation. Previous studies find homonym processing influenced by lexical frequency (Duffy et al. 1988) as well as syntactic and semantic...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (4)
Project
The current project stems from the common concern of members of the MMFA, researchers and clinicians to increase participation and inclusion of individuals with communication limitations in an environment such as the MMFA. Due to difficulties in communicating verbally and retaining information, and due to accompanying potential cognitive and physical limitations, persons with aphasia typically have difficulties understanding long and complex explanatory texts, posing questions, interacting with others, etc. (Brennan, Worrall, & McKenna 2005). Obstacles such as these may otherwise detract from this population’s experience, may exclude them from certain exhibits or facilities, and may cause anxiety and confusion, resulting in a growing number of community members choosing to not visit the MMFA or other cultural centres. Our team comprising researchers, museum personnel, a clinician and scholars will work together with people with aphasia and their caregivers to identify real-world obstacles as they experience a walk-through of the MMFA. This activity will constitute a participatory real-world experience as participants and the team members will collaborate throughout the various stages of the study and explore the issues that arise to jointly arrive at optimal solutions. The immediate results of the study are anticipated to provide specific recommendations, leading to precise and customized modifications and transformations at the MMFA. The long-term deliverables will include concrete solutions with benefits to other populations with invisible or visible disabilities and will ultimately render the MMFA and other similar venues truly inclusive and accessible environments to be enjoyed by all