Christian C Voigt

Christian C Voigt
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research · Department of Evolutionary Ecology

PD Dr. (Associate Professor)

About

390
Publications
186,263
Reads
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9,984
Citations
Citations since 2016
179 Research Items
6619 Citations
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Introduction
I am a wildlife biologist who is interested in the functional mechanisms that define the resistence of animal populations towards natural and anthropogenic challenges. I study both proximate (ecological, physiological) and ultimate (evolutionary) factors. Usually, I use bats as focal species because they are diverse, have interesting life-history features (longevity, hibernation, powered flight) and because they are important for ecosystems. For more see also www.batlab.de or follow #voigtbatlab
Additional affiliations
June 2001 - April 2020
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research
Position
  • Head of Department
October 2000 - May 2001
Bielefeld University
Position
  • PostDoc Position
March 2000 - August 2020
Cornell University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (390)
Book
Full-text available
This book focuses on central themes related to the conservation of bats. It details their response to land-use change and management practices, intensified urbanization and roost disturbance and loss. Increasing interactions between humans and bats as a result of hunting, disease relationships, occupation of human dwellings, and conflict over fruit...
Article
Full-text available
Vocalizations are of pivotal importance for many animals, yet sound propagation in air is severely limited. To expand their vocalization range, animals can produce high-intensity sounds, which can come at high energetic costs. High-intensity echolocation is thought to have evolved in bats because the costs of calling are reported to be negligible d...
Article
Full-text available
Wind turbines (WTs) frequently kill bats worldwide. During environmental impact assessments, consultant ecologists often use automated ultrasonic detectors (AUDs) to estimate the activity and identity of bats in the zone of highest mortality risk at WTs in order to formulate mitigation schemes, such as increased curtailment speeds to prevent casual...
Article
Full-text available
We review how different bat guilds respond to artificial light at night (ALAN) and assess how the impacts can vary according to ecological context. All studied European species respond negatively to ALAN close to roosts and drinking sites, and impacts occur across a wide range of light colours and intensities. Most bat species are sensitive to ALAN...
Article
Full-text available
s Wind energy production is particularly rewarding along coastlines, yet coastlines are often important as migratory corridors for wildlife. This creates a conflict between energy production from renewable sources and conservation goals, which needs to be considered during environmental planning. To shed light on the spatial interactions of a high...
Article
Full-text available
Large numbers of bats are killed at wind turbines worldwide. To formulate mitigation measures such as curtailment, recent approaches relate the acoustic activity of bats around reference turbines to casualties to extrapolate fatality rates at turbines where only acoustic surveys are conducted. Here, we modeled how sensitive this approach is when sp...
Article
Full-text available
The acute phase response (APR) is an evolutionarily well-conserved part of the innate immune defense against pathogens. However, recent studies in bats yielded surprisingly diverse results compared to previous APR studies on both vertebrate and invertebrate species. This is especially interesting due to the known role of bats as reservoirs for viru...
Article
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Speculations about the origin of SARS-CoV-2 have catapulted bats into the spotlight of scientific and societal attention, with unforeseen consequences for bat conservation. In two global surveys with bat experts before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, we assessed their (i) threat perceptions, emotions towards bats and social trust in decision make...
Article
Full-text available
The wind energy-bat conflict is well documented for the onshore sector, with high numbers of casualties, specifically for migratory bat species. Offshore wind turbines might be a threat to bats as well, yet offshore bat migration is poorly documented. Accordingly, potential conflicts between bat conservation and offshore wind energy production are...
Article
Animals that depend on ephemeral, patchily distributed prey often use public information to locate resource patches. The use of public information can lead to the aggregation of foragers at prey patches, a mechanism known as local enhancement. However, when ephemeral resources are distributed over large areas, foragers may also need to increase sea...
Article
Full-text available
Worldwide, wind turbines are increasingly being built at forest sites to meet the goals of national climate strategies. Yet, the impact on biodiversity is barely understood. Bats may be heavily affected by wind turbines in forests, because many species depend on forest ecosystems for roosting and hunting and can experience high fatality rates at wi...
Article
Full-text available
Urbanisation is a major contributor to the loss of biodiversity. Its rapid progress is mostly at the expense of natural ecosystems and the species inhabiting them. While some species can adjust quickly and thrive in cities, many others cannot. To support biodiversity conservation and guide management decisions in urban areas, it is important to fin...
Article
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Agricultural practice has led to landscape simplification and biodiversity decline, yet recently, energy‐producing infrastructures, such as wind turbines, have been added to these simplified agroecosystems, turning them into multi‐functional energy‐agroecosystems. Here, we studied the trophic interactions of bats killed at wind turbines using a DNA...
Article
Full-text available
Bats are protected by national and international legislation in European countries, yet many species, particularly migratory aerial insectivores, collide with wind turbines which counteracts conservation efforts. Within the European Union it is legally required to curtail the operation of wind turbines at periods of high bat activity, yet this is n...
Preprint
Full-text available
In late summer, migratory bats of the temperate zone face the challenge of accomplishing two energy-demanding tasks almost at the same time: migration and mating. Both require information and involve search efforts, such as localizing prey or finding potential mates. In non-migrating bat species, playback studies showed that listening to vocalizati...
Article
Full-text available
Conservation of migratory birds requires knowledge of breeding and nonbreeding ranges and the connections between them. European turtle doves ( Streptopelia turtur ) are Palearctic-African long-distance migrants with wintering areas in the Sub-Saharan belt that are classed as vulnerable due to strong population declines. However, detailed non-breed...
Article
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In order to deal with the current dramatic biodiversity decline, the public at large needs to be aware of and participate in biodiversity research activities. One way to do so is to involve citizens in citizen science (CS) projects. These are projects in which researchers collaborate with volunteering citizens in scientific research projects. Yet,...
Article
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The increasing use of chemicals in the European Union (EU) has resulted in environmental emissions and wildlife exposures. For approving a chemical within the EU, producers need to conduct an environmental risk assessment, which typically relies on data generated under laboratory conditions without considering the ecological and landscape context....
Article
Full-text available
Large numbers of bats are killed by wind turbines globally, yet the specific demographic consequences of wind turbine mortality are still unclear. In this study, we compared characteristics of Nathusius' pipistrelles (Pipistrellus nathusii) killed at wind turbines (N = 119) to those observed within the live population (N = 524) during the summer mi...
Article
Full-text available
Global change, including urbanisation, threatens many of the >1400 bat species. Nevertheless, certain areas within highly urbanised cities may be suitable to harbour bat populations. Thus, managing urban habitats could contribute to bat conservation. Here, we wanted to establish evidence-based recommendations on how to improve urban spaces for the...
Article
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Species richness exhibits well-known patterns across elevational gradients in various taxa but represents only one aspect of quantifying biodiversity patterns. Functional and phylogenetic diversity have received much less attention, particularly for vertebrate taxa. There is still a limited understanding of how functional, phylogenetic and taxonomi...
Article
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Billions of birds migrate from the Palaearctic to sub-Saharan Africa, yet we are unaware about where exactly they stay over winter and how consistent they have been using these wintering areas over historical times. Here, we inferred the historical wintering areas of Eurasian Golden Orioles (Oriolus oriolus) from stable isotope ratios of feathers....
Article
Emerging infectious diseases may become serious threats to wildlife, a prominent example being the white-nose disease (WND). In case of WND, the cold-loving fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans colonizes bats during hibernation, invades the skin and has already lead to the death of millions of bats in North America. P. destructans most likely origin...
Technical Report
Bat migration across the baltic and Noth Sea. The report is available online at: https://www.natur-und-erneuerbare.de/fileadmin/Daten/Download_Dokumente/02_Abschlussberichte_anderer_Form/Fledermausmigration-Nordsee-Ostsee_Batmove_Abschlussbericht.pdf
Article
Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd), the causative agent of white-nose syndrome in North America, has decimated bat populations within a decade. The fungus impacts bats during hibernation when physiological functions, including immune responses, are down-regulated. Studies have shown that Pd is native to Europe, where it is not associated with mass m...
Article
Full-text available
The exact anatomical location for an iron particle-based magnetic sense remains enigmatic in vertebrates. For mammals, findings from a cornea anaesthesia experiment in mole rats suggest that it carries the primary sensors for magnetoreception. Yet, this has never been tested in a free-ranging mammal. Here, we investigated whether intact corneal sen...
Article
Ecologically similar species partition their use of resources and habitats and thus coexist due to ecological segregation in space, time, or diet. In seabirds, this segregation may differ over the annual cycle or vary inter-annually. We evaluated niche segregation in 3 sympatric storm-petrel species ( Hydrobates melania , H. leucorhous , and H. mic...
Article
Full-text available
Integrating information on species-specific sensory perception with spatial activity provides a high-resolution understanding of how animals explore environments, yet frequently used exploration assays commonly ignore sensory acquisition as a measure for exploration. Echolocation is an active sensing system used by hundreds of mammal species, prima...
Article
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With increasing livestock numbers, competition and avoidance are increasingly shaping resource availability for wild ungulates. Shifts in the dietary niche of wild ungulates are likely and can be expected to negatively affect their fitness. The Mongolian Gobi constitutes the largest remaining refuge for several threatened ungulates, but unprecedent...
Article
The increase in artificial light at night (ALAN) is widely considered as a major driver for the worldwide decline of nocturnal pollinators such as moths. However, the relationship between light and trees as ‘islands of shade’ within urban areas has not yet been fully understood. Here, we studied (1) the effects of three landscape variables, i.e. so...
Article
Full-text available
Evidence is accumulating that insects are frequently killed by operating wind turbines, yet it is poorly understood if these fatalities cause population declines and changes in assemblage structures on various spatial scales. Current observations suggest that mostly hill‐topping, swarming, and migrating insects interact with wind turbines. Recently...
Article
Full-text available
Migrating species and populations are affected by conditions existing across large geographical scales. The degree to which populations mix at stop-over sites and wintering grounds is variable and can involve important fitness consequences. Thus, the link between breeding and wintering grounds and seasonal shifts in population structure are importa...
Article
Full-text available
This study is the first step towards more systematic monitoring of urban bat fauna in Vietnam and other Southeast Asian countries by collecting bat echolocation call parameters in Ho Chi Minh and Tra Vinh cities. We captured urban bats and then recorded echolocation calls after releasing in a tent. Additional bat’s echolocation calls from the free-...
Article
Photo stimuli can be an effective way to engage people in wildlife conservation by stimulating emotions and cognitions. In a before-after experiment, we studied the effects of two sets of photo stimuli (bat under distress vs. bat with engaged human) on the observer’s wildlife value orientations, emotions, attitudes (bats/conservation) and behaviora...
Article
Full-text available
RATIONALE Identifying migratory corridors of animals is essential for their effective protection, yet the exact location of such corridors is often unknown, particularly for elusive animals such as bats. While migrating along the German coastline, Nathusius’ pipistrelles (Pipistrellus nathusii) are regularly killed at wind turbines. Therefore, we e...
Preprint
Full-text available
Integrating information on species-specific sensory perception together with spatial activity provides a high-resolution understanding of how animals explore environments, yet frequently used exploration assays commonly ignore sensory acquisition as a measure for exploration. Echolocation is an active sensing system used by hundreds of mammal speci...
Article
Full-text available
Sexual segregation in foraging occurs in some species and populations of boobies (Sulidae), but it is not a general pattern. Sexual segregation in foraging may occur to avoid competition for food, and this competition may intensify during specific stages of breeding. We examined sexual segregation in foraging in relation to breeding stage in masked...
Article
A male Pipistrellus nathusii ringed in Pape Natural Park (S Latvia) in August 2015 was recovered recently dead in Pitillas’ Lagoon Natural Reserve (N Spain) in March 2017. At 2224 km in SSW direction, this is the first documented bat migration between these countries and worldwide the longest migration record of a bat. We also report other observat...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Maintaining a competent immune system is energetically costly and thus immunity may be traded against other costly traits such as seasonal migration. Here, we tested in long-distance migratory Nathusius’ pipistrelles (Pipistrellus nathusii), if selected branches of immunity are expressed differently in response to the energy demands and ox...
Article
Many migratory species have shifted their geographic distribution in response to climate change, yet the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood, particularly for mammals. We hypothesized that generational shifts are underlying the observed colonization of hibernation sites further north in a migratory bat, the common noctule (Nyctalus noctula)...
Chapter
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Die Erfassung des Artvorkommens und der Aktivität von Fledermäusen im Rahmen von Genehmigungsverfahren für Windenergieanlagen (WEA) beruht auf der legalen Notwendigkeit, das gesetzlich verankerte Störungs- und Tötungsverbot geschützter Arten umzusetzen. In einer Internetumfrage baten wir Fachexpert*innen um eine Einschätzung der Eignung und Praxist...
Chapter
Full-text available
Im Rahmen einer internetbasierten Umfrage wurde die Einschätzung von Expert*innen aus der Genehmigungspraxis von Windenergieanlagen (Vertreter*innen der Naturschutzbehörden und dem Windenergiesektor, Mitglieder und Mitarbeiter*innen von Umweltschutzorganisationen, Wissenschaftler*innen und Fachgutachter*innen) zur Vereinbarkeit von Artenschutz, spe...
Article
Cost of flight at various speeds is a crucial determinant of flight behavior in birds. Aerodynamic models, predicting that mechanical power ( P mech ) varies with flight speed in a U-shaped manner, have been used together with an energy conversion factor (efficiency) to estimate metabolic power ( P met ). Despite few empirical studies, efficiency h...
Article
Ungulates are famous for large-scale movements in response to local and regional changes in plant productivity. However, it is poorly understood how non-migratory ungulates respond towards shortages in plant availability. In the arid Kunene Region of Namibia, we studied the variation of home ranges and habitat use of gemsbok during a period of seve...
Article
Mass swarming of tens of thousands of common pipistrelles in front of hibernacula of the Carpathian Mountains suggests that bats may originate from a large catchment area. However, until now neither banding nor molecular data have resolved the geographic origin of common pipistrelles at these sites. Here, we measured the acoustic activity of bats a...
Article
Full-text available
Although the invention and widespread use of artificial light is clearly one of the most important human technological advances, the transformation of nightscapes is increasingly recognized as having adverse effects. Night lighting may have serious physiological consequences for humans, ecological and evolutionary implications for animal and plant...
Article
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Green-green dilemmas are particularly challenging since they involve two desirable goals, yet with detrimental counter-effects. Although wind energy production is to some desirable as a form of renewable energy for reducing global CO 2 emission, it conflicts with conservation goals when airborne animals die during collisions. Yet, protecting specie...
Article
Full-text available
Some carnivores are known to survive well in urban habitats, yet the underlying behavioral tactics are poorly understood. One likely explanation for the success in urban habitats might be that carnivores are generalist consumers. However, urban populations of carnivores could as well consist of specialist feeders. Here, we compared the isotopic spe...
Article
Full-text available
In Eastern Europe, wind energy production is currently promoted as an important source of renewable energy, yet in most cases without appropriate consideration of the negative impacts wind turbines (WT) may have on protected species such as bats. Here, we present first data on fatality rates, fatality factors and the likely origin of bats killed by...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging fungal diseases have become challenges for wildlife health and conservation. North American hibernating bat species are threatened by the psychrophilic fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) causing the disease called white‐nose syndrome (WNS) with unprecedented mortality rates. The fungus is widespread in North America and Europe, howev...
Article
Full-text available
Organismal movement is ubiquitous and facilitates important ecological mechanisms that drive community and meta-community composition and hence biodiversity. In most existing ecological theories and models in biodiversity research, movement is represented simplistically, ignoring the behavioural basis of movement and consequently the variation in b...
Article
The airspace of the lower troposphere is an important habitat for many animals, including open-space foraging bats. Yet, we are missing a detailed understanding of how bats forage in the seemingly unstructured open space. As part of an exploratory study, we present data on flight activity for Taphozous theobaldi (Dobson 1872), an aerial insectivore...
Article
Full-text available
European Turtle Doves (Streptopelia turtur) are long‐distance migrants and have experienced a population decline of more than 78% since 1980. Their conservation depends on refined knowledge of breeding origins and population connectivity. Feathers collected at stopover sites, but molted at breeding grounds, provide an opportunity to assign birds to...
Article
Full-text available
In anthropogenic landscapes, aerial insectivores are often confronted with variable habitat complexity, which may influence the distribution of prey. Yet, high mobility may allow aerial insectivores to adjust their foraging strategy to different prey distributions. We investigated if aerial‐hunting common noctules (Nyctalus noctula) adjust their f...