Christian Krekel

Christian Krekel
The London School of Economics and Political Science | LSE · Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)

PhD in Economics

About

35
Publications
23,507
Reads
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734
Citations
Introduction
I am a Post-Doctoral Research Fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, and a Consultant at the World Bank. I am an applied economist: my research fields are environmental and labour economics, policy and programme evaluation, and applied microeconometrics, with a particular focus on spatial analysis. My PhD in Economics was completed at the Paris School of Economics in the autumn of 2017. I am primarily interested in how our natural, built, or organisational environment affects our lives – specifically our behaviour, health, and (ultimately) our well-being. My work is aimed at informing evidence-based policy on how to improve these outcomes in a cost-effective manner. For my work, I have been awarded the FEEM Award (Young Economist Award) by the EEA.
Additional affiliations
January 2019 - June 2019
London School of Economics
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Graduate-Level: Wellbeing and Public Policy (with Professor Paul Frijters)
March 2018 - March 2018
City, University of London
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Graduate-Level: Applied Econometric Research Methods (with Professor Anke Plagnol)
February 2018 - February 2018
University of Warwick
Position
  • Lecturer
Description
  • Undergraduate-Level: Economics of Well-being (with Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee)
Education
October 2015 - October 2017
Paris School of Economics
Field of study
January 2015 - June 2015
London School of Economics
Field of study
September 2010 - June 2011
London School of Economics
Field of study

Publications

Publications (35)
Article
Throughout the world, governments foster the deployment of wind power to mitigate negative externalities of conventional electricity generation, notably CO2 emissions. Wind turbines, however, are not free of externalities themselves, particularly interference with landscape aesthetics. We quantify these negative externalities using the life satisfa...
Article
Full-text available
Enriched environments elicit brain plasticity in animals. In humans it is unclear which environment is enriching. Living in a city has been associated with increased amygdala activity in a stress paradigm, and being brought up in a city with increased pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC) activity. We set out to identify geographical character...
Article
We investigate the effect of urban land use on residential well-being in major German cities, using panel data from the German Socio-Economic Panel and cross-section data from the European Urban Atlas. We reduce concerns about endogeneity by employing fixed-effects (within) estimators, with individual and city of residence fixed effects, while cont...
Article
Background: Neighborhood characteristics are important determinants of individual health and well-being. For example, characteristics such as noise and pollution affect health directly, while other characteristics affect health and well-being by either providing resources (e.g. social capital in the neighborhood), which individuals can use to cope...
Article
Full-text available
We study the impact of the Fukushima disaster on environmental concerns, well-being, risk aversion, and political preferences in Germany, Switzerland, and the UK. In these countries, overall life satisfaction did not significantly decrease, but the disaster significantly increased environmental concerns among Germans. One underlying mechanism likel...
Chapter
In recent years, policy-makers have taken steps towards acknowledging the importance of mental states when appraising citizens’ wellbeing on the one side and the urgent challenge of shifting towards a more ecological society on the other. Previous work has established an encouraging positive link between these two seemingly unrelated notions, subje...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between urbanization, the brain, and human mental health is subject to intensive debate in the current scientific literature. Particularly, since mood and anxiety disorders as well as schizophrenia are known to be more frequent in urban compared to rural regions. Here, we investigated the association between cerebral signatures, me...
Article
Despite a wealth of research on its correlates, relatively little is known about how to effectively raise wellbeing in local communities by means of intervention. Can we teach people to live happier lives, cost-effectively and at scale? We conducted a randomised controlled trial of a scalable social-psychological intervention rooted in self-determi...
Article
Full-text available
Introduction: Control beliefs can protect against age-related declines in functioning. It is unclear whether neighborhood characteristics shape how much control people perceive over their life. This article studies associations of neighborhood characteristics with control beliefs of residents of a diverse metropolitan area (Berlin, Germany). Meth...
Article
A happy choice: a response to the responses - PAUL FRIJTERS, ANDREW E. CLARK, CHRISTIAN KREKEL, RICHARD LAYARD
Article
In this article, we lay out the basic case for wellbeing as the goal of government. We briefly review the history of this idea, which goes back to the ancient Greeks and was the acknowledged ideal of the Enlightenment. We then discuss possible measures on which a wellbeing orientation could be based, emphasizing the importance of acknowledging the...
Chapter
We study what makes for a good job, by looking at which workplace characteristics are conducive or detrimental to job satisfaction. Using data from 37 countries around the world in the 2015 Work Orientations module of the International Social Survey Programme, we find that having an interesting job and good relationships at work, especially with ma...
Article
Full-text available
Hosting the Olympic Games costs billions of taxpayer dollars. Following a quasi-experimental setting, this paper assesses the intangible impact of the London 2012 Olympics, using a novel panel of 26,000 residents in London, Paris, and Berlin during the summers of 2011, 2012, and 2013. We show that hosting the Olympics increases subjective well-bein...
Chapter
Full-text available
The Global Happiness Policy Report is produced by the Global Happiness Council and contains papers by expert working groups on happiness for good governance. Our chapter on work and well-being provides evidence and policy recommendations on best practices to promote happiness and well-being in the workplace. The first Global Happiness Policy Report...
Preprint
Full-text available
To host the Olympic Games, governments are willing to spend billions of taxpayer dollars. This paper focuses on the 2012 Olympic Summer Games and estimates their intangible benefits on Londoners, versus Parisians and Berliners, in a quasi natural experiment setting. We show that hosting the Olympics increases subjective well-being of the host city'...
Preprint
Full-text available
We study whether raising instructional time can crowd out student pro-social behaviour. To this end, we exploit a large educational reform in Germany that has raised weekly instructional hours for high school students by 12.5% as a quasi-natural experiment. Using a difference-in-differences design, we find that this rise has a negative and sizeable...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Positive education views school as a place where students not only cultivate their intellectual minds, but also develop a broad set of character strengths, virtues, and competencies, which together support their well-being. What this looks like differs from country to country and school-to-school, but at its core is the 'character + academics' appr...
Working Paper
Full-text available
We show that hosting the Olympic Games in 2012 had a positive impact on the life satisfaction and happiness of Londoners during the Games, compared to residents of Paris and Berlin. Notwithstanding issues of causal inference, the magnitude of the effects is equivalent to moving from the bottom to the fourth income decile. But they do not last very...
Working Paper
Full-text available
We show that hosting the Olympic Games in 2012 had a positive impact on the life satisfaction and happiness of Londoners during the Games, compared to residents of Paris and Berlin. Notwithstanding issues of causal inference, the magnitude of the effects is equivalent to moving from the bottom to the fourth income decile. But they do not last very...
Working Paper
Full-text available
We show that hosting the Olympic Games in 2012 had a positive impact on the life satisfaction and happiness of Londoners during the Games, compared to residents of Paris and Berlin. Notwithstanding issues of causal inference, the magnitude of the effects is equivalent to moving from the bottom to the fourth income decile. But they do not last very...
Working Paper
We show that hosting the Olympic Games in 2012 had a positive impact on the life satisfaction and happiness of Londoners during the Games, compared to residents of Paris and Berlin. Notwithstanding issues of causal inference, the magnitude of the effects is equivalent to moving from the bottom to the fourth income decile. But they do not last very...
Working Paper
Full-text available
Throughout the world, governments foster the deployment of wind power to mitigate negative externalities of conventional technologies, notably CO2 emissions. Wind turbines, however, are not free of externalities themselves, particularly interference with landscape aesthetics. We quantify the negative externalities associated with the presence of wi...
Working Paper
Full-text available
We show that hosting the Olympic Games in 2012 had a positive impact on the life satisfaction and happiness of Londoners during the Games, compared to residents of Paris and Berlin. Notwithstanding issues of causal inference, the magnitude of the effects is equivalent to moving from the bottom to the fourth income decile. But they do not last very...
Research
Full-text available
We study the impact of the Fukushima disaster on environmental concerns and well‐being in Germany and other industrialized countries, more than 5,000 miles distant. While we do not find evidence that subjective well‐being was significantly affected – not in Germany, Switzerland, or the UK – the disaster significantly increased environmental concern...
Technical Report
Full-text available
Aircraft noise is a particularly problematic source of noise as many airports are located in or near major cities and, as a result, densely populated areas are affected. Data from the Berlin Aging Study II (Berliner Altersstudie II, BASE-II), whose socioeconomic module is based on the longitudinal SocioEconomic Panel (SOEP) study which has been con...

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Projects

Project (1)
Archived project
Impact of green space on well-being/life satisfaction. Relation between urban green space and disease pattern (e.g. diabetes, sleep disorder, joint disease).