Christian de Muizon

Christian de Muizon
Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle · Dépt Origines et Evolution

PhD

About

204
Publications
168,094
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
7,110
Citations
Citations since 2017
62 Research Items
3284 Citations
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
20172018201920202021202220230100200300400500
Additional affiliations
March 2019 - present
CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research)
Position
  • Managing Director
July 2002 - December 2016
CNRS - Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle
Position
  • Head of Department
October 1982 - March 2019
CNRS (French National Centre for Scientific Research)
Position
  • Research Director

Publications

Publications (204)
Article
Within the abundant mammal fauna of Tiupampa (Early Paleocene, Bolivia), the pantodont Alcidedorbignya inopinata Muizon & Marshall, 1987 is the eutherian represented by the largest number of specimens. The sample recovered in this locality includes numerous isolated teeth and jaws as well as six skulls, most of them being associated with complete o...
Article
The present paper describes a partial skull referred to Incadelphys antiquus, from the early Palaeocene of Tiupampa (Bolivia). The specimen includes the anterior part of the skull with maxillae, premaxillae, nasals, lacrimals, anterior part of frontals and jugal, and both dentaries. Most of the teeth are preserved except some incisors. Some of the...
Presentation
Tiupampa fauna (Santa Lucia Formation, Bolivia, Lower Paleocene) is of particular interest because representatives of the sebecids (Zulmasuchus querejazus (Buffetaut & Marshall 1992)), this family of altirostral notosuchians to which an exclusively terrestrial ecology is attributed (Pol et al., 2012), are found there. Through the multi-isotopic geo...
Article
Full-text available
The evolution of thermometabolism in pseudosuchians (Late Triassic to the present) remains a partly unsolved issue: extant taxa (crocodilians) are ectothermic, but the clade was inferred ancestrally endothermic. Here we inferred the thermometabolic regime of two neosuchian groups, Goniopholididae (Early Jurassic to Late Cretaceous) and Dyrosauridae...
Article
Full-text available
The northward-flowing Humboldt Current hosts perpetually high levels of productivity along the western coast of South America. Here, we aim to elucidate the deep-time history of this globally important ecosystem based on a detailed palaeoecological analysis of the exceptionally preserved middle–upper Miocene vertebrate assemblages of the Pisco Form...
Article
Full-text available
The Miocene Pisco Formation, broadly exposed in the Ica Desert of southern Peru, is among the most outstanding Cenozoic marine Fossil-Lagerstätten worldwide. It is renowned for its exceptional preservation and abundance of vertebrate fossils, including a rich assemblage of whales and dolphins (Cetacea). Here, we integrate taphonomic data on 890 mar...
Article
Full-text available
The highly productive waters of the Humboldt Current System (HCS) host a particular temperate ecosystem within the tropics, whose history is still largely unknown. The Pisco Formation, deposited during Mio-Pliocene times in the Peruvian continental margin has yielded an outstanding collection of coastal-marine fossils, providing an opportunity to u...
Article
Full-text available
Among the many hyper-longirostrine dolphins (Odontoceti) from the Miocene, members of the family Eurhinodelphinidae bear two highly distinctive cranial features: a long and edentulous premaxillary portion of the rostrum and a mandible that is significantly shorter than the rostrum. Until now, unambiguously attributed members of this clade were only...
Article
The oldest record of a carnivoran mammal in South America corresponds to the extinct procyonid Cyonasua (late Miocene-early Pleistocene). Up to now, this genus was recorded in Argentina, Uruguay, Bolivia, and Venezuela. In this contribution, we report the first occurrence of Cyonasua in the Pacific coast of Peru, recovered from the late Miocene mar...
Article
Full-text available
Nowadays, the odontocete family Kogiidae is monotypic and only includes two species of diminutive relatives of the great sperm whale Physeter Linnaeus, 1758. Conversely, a growing body of extinct species indicates that kogiids were diverse and disparate during the late Neogene. The fossil record of Kogiidae is, to date, represented by several crani...
Article
Full-text available
The modern sperm whales Kogia and Physeter (superfamily Physeteroidea) represent highly disparate, relict members of a group of odontocetes that peaked in diversity during the middle to late Miocene. Based on a highly informative specimen (including the cranium with ear bones, mandibles, teeth and some postcranial elements) from the lower Miocene (...
Article
Full-text available
The moderately rich past diversity of the superfamily Inioidea (Cetacea, Odontoceti) in both the Atlantic and Pacific oceans contrasts with the present survival of a single genus (Inia, Amazon river dolphin, family Iniidae) in freshwater deposits of South America and of a single species (Pontoporia blainvillei, franciscana, family Pontoporiidae) al...
Article
Full-text available
The phylogenetic relationships of “opossum-like” metatherians, Herpetotheriidae and Peradectidae, continue to be debated, and yet they are key taxa in the evolutionary history of the crown-group Marsupialia. With state-of-the-art technologies such as X-ray computed tomography (CT scanning), it is now possible to access the inner anatomy of the skul...
Article
Full-text available
Several aspects of the fascinating evolutionary history of toothed and baleen whales (Cetacea) are still to be clarified due to the fragmentation and discontinuity (in space and time) of the fossil record. Here we open a window on the past, describing a part of the extraordinary cetacean fossil assemblage deposited in a restricted interval of time...
Article
Full-text available
Numerous aquatic crocodyliforms have been found during the last four decades of fieldwork in the Maastrichtian El Molino and Palaeocene Santa Lucía Formations in Bolivia. We describe new material in detail and review previously described specimens. This work enables identification of at least three new Palaeocene dyrosaurid species and the reassign...
Article
Full-text available
The living tree sloths Choloepus and Bradypus are the only remaining members of Folivora, a major xenarthran radiation that occupied a wide range of habitats in many parts of the western hemisphere during the Cenozoic, including both continents and the West Indies. Ancient DNA evidence has played only a minor role in folivoran systematics, as most...
Article
A new megabalanine barnacle, Austromegabalanus carrioli sp. nov., is described from lower Miocene strata of the Chilcatay Formation (East Pisco Basin, southern Peru). An assessment of the value of interlaminate figures in distinguishing species within the tribe Austromegabalanini from thin sections is provided-a useful identification tool with foss...
Article
Full-text available
Mystacodon selenensis Lambert, Martínez-Cáceres, Bianucci, Di Celma, Salas-Gismondi, Steurbaut, Urbina & Muizon, 2017 is a toothed mysticete that represents the earliest member of the suborder in the current state of knowledge. Its holotype is a relatively complete skeleton from the upper Eocene (early Priabonian, c. 36.4 Ma) Yumaque Member of the...
Article
Full-text available
Based on mapping of laterally traceable stratigraphic discontinuities, we propose a high-resolution allostratigraphic scheme for one of the world's foremost fossil marine vertebrate Lagerstätten: the lower Miocene strata of the Chilcatay Formation exposed along the Ica River near Zamaca, southern Peru. Measured sections combined with 1:10,000 scale...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
New crocodyliform material from the early Paleocene of South America and North Africa provides the opportunity to evaluate the distribution of longirostrine crocodyliforms through the K-Pg boundary. We conducted simple diversity analyses on two longirostrine groups that crossed the crisis: gavialoids and dyrosaurids. Even if they should be consider...
Article
Cetaceans originated in south Asia more than 50 million years ago (mya), from a small quadrupedal artiodactyl ancestor [1-3]. Amphibious whales gradually dispersed westward along North Africa and arrived in North America before 41.2 mya [4]. However, fossil evidence on when, through which pathway, and under which locomotion abilities these early wh...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is the first integrated account of the sedimentology, stratigraphy, and vertebrate paleontology for the marine strata of the Chilcatay Formation exposed at Ullujaya, Pisco basin (southern Peru). An allostratigraphic framework for the investigated strata was established using geological mapping (1:4000 scale) and conventional sedimentary...
Article
Full-text available
Map supplementary material
Article
Full-text available
The present paper describes a disarticulated skull of Allqokirus australis Marshall & Muizon, 1988, a basal sparassodont (Metatheria, Mammalia) from the early Palaeocene (c. 65 Ma.) of Tiupampa (Bolivia). The specimen includes the rostrum and palate with right premaxilla, both maxillae, left lacrimal, palatines and most upper teeth. The second larg...
Article
Full-text available
The taphonomy and palaeoecology of the early Miocene (Burdigalian) vertebrate assemblage of Ullujaya (East Pisco Basin, Peru) is here described. Vertebrate remains are concentrated in marine facies (Ct1a association) of the exposed Chilcatay Formation (dated 19–18 Ma) deposited within a 30–40 m deep, semi-enclosed, offshore environment. Coupled wit...
Article
Full-text available
Although a high number of extant beaked whale species (Cetacea, Odontoceti, Ziphiidae) live in the Southern Ocean and neighbouring areas, only little is known about the past occupation of the region by these highly specialized, deep diving and echolocating cetaceans. Recently, longline fishing activities along the seafloor at depths of 500-2000 m o...
Article
Full-text available
Through phenotypic plasticity, bones can change in structure and morphology, in response to physiological and biomechanical influences over the course of individual life. Changes in bones also occur in evolution as functional adaptations to the environment. In this study, we report on the evolution of bone mass increase (BMI) that occurred in the p...
Article
Full-text available
The present 3D Dataset contains the 3D models analyzed in: Amson et al., Under review. Evolutionary Adaptation to Aquatic Lifestyle in Extinct Sloths Can Lead to Systemic Alteration of Bone Structure doi:10.1098/rspb.2018.0270.
Article
Full-text available
The South Asian river dolphin (Platanista gangetica) is the only extant survivor of the large clade Platanistoidea, having a well-diversified fossil record from the Late Oligocene to the Middle Miocene. Based on a partial skeleton collected from the Chilcatay Formation (Chilcatay Fm; southern coast of Peru), we report here a new squalodelphinid gen...
Article
Full-text available
Among odontocetes, members of the family Kogiidae (pygmy and dwarf sperm whales) are known as small-sized and in many respects enigmatic relatives of the great sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus. Most of the still scanty fossil record of Kogiidae is represented by isolated skulls and ear bones from Neogene deposits of the Northern Hemisphere, with...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
Cetotheriidae are an iconic, nearly extinct family of baleen whales (Mysticeti) with a highly distinct cranial morphology. Their origins remain a mystery, with even the most archaic species showing a variety of characteristic features. Here, we describe a new species of archaic cetotheriid, Tiucetus rosae, from the Miocene of Peru. The new material...
Article
Full-text available
A key step in the evolutionary history of Odontoceti (echolocating toothed cetaceans) is the transition from the ancestral heterodont condition – characterized by the presence of double-rooted cheek teeth bearing accessory denticles – to the homodont dentition displayed by most extant odontocete species. During the last few decades, new finds and t...
Article
Full-text available
The unusual mix of morphological traits displayed by extinct South American native ungulates (SANUs) confounded both Charles Darwin, who first discovered them, and Richard Owen, who tried to resolve their relationships. Here we report an almost complete mitochondrial genome for the litoptern Macrauchenia. Our dated phylogenetic tree places Macrauch...
Article
Although combined molecular and morphological analyses point to a late middle Eocene (38-39 million years ago) origin for the clade Neoceti (Odontoceti, echolocating toothed whales plus Mysticeti, baleen whales, and relatives), the oldest known mysticete fossil dates from the latest Eocene (about 34 million years ago) of Antarctica [1, 2]. Consider...
Article
Full-text available
Cynthiacetus peruvianus Martínez-Cáceres & Muizon, 2011 is a Dorudon-like basilosaurid (Cetacea, Basilosauridae), being one of the largest members of the family. The holotype of this species is a sub-complete skeleton, which comes from the late Eocene (Priabonian) of the Otuma Formation on the southern coast of Peru. A thorough description of this...
Article
Full-text available
The question whether taxonomic descriptions naming new animal species without type specimen(s) deposited in collections should be accepted for publication by scientific journals and allowed by the Code has already been discussed in Zootaxa (Dubois & Nemésio 2007; Donegan 2008, 2009; Nemésio 2009a–b; Dubois 2009; Gentile & Snell 2009; Minelli 2009;...
Article
Full-text available
The three extant sperm whale species, the giant Physeter macrocephalus and the diminutive Kogia species, are relict members of the superfamily Physeteroidea, whose evolutionary history is traced back to the late Oligocene. Although well-preserved and diagnostic cranial remains are relatively scarce, the physeteroid fossil record reveals a considera...
Article
Full-text available
Odontocetes (toothed whales) rely upon echoes of their own vocalizations to navigate and find prey underwater [1 • Au W.W.L. The Sonar of Dolphins. Spring-Verlag, 1993 • Crossref • Google Scholar ]. This sensory adaptation, known as echolocation, operates most effectively when using high frequencies, and odontocetes are rivaled only by bats in th...
Article
Full-text available
The Thalassocninae is a monogeneric subfamily of five species of Neogene sloths. Until now, Thalassocnus has been considered as belonging to the Nothrotheriidae, a family of megatherian “ground sloths” of intermediate body size. However, no previous phylogenetic analysis has questioned such a familial attribution. Here we perform an extensive analy...
Article
Full-text available
Leptictida are basal Paleocene to Oligocene eutherians from Europe and North America comprising species with highly specialized postcranial features including elongated hind limbs. Among them, the European Leptictidium was probably a bipedal runner or jumper. Because the semicircular canals of the inner ear are involved in detecting angular acceler...