Christian Bredemeier

Christian Bredemeier
Bergische Universität Wuppertal | Uni-Wuppertal, BUW

Professor

About

25
Publications
560
Reads
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115
Citations
Citations since 2017
10 Research Items
93 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
Introduction
Christian Bredemeier is a Professor of Applied Economics at University of Wuppertal, Germany. Christian does research in Macroeconomics, Labor Economics, Public Economics, and the Economics of the Familiy. His most recent publication is 'Estimating Labor Supply Elasticities with Joint Borrowing Constraints of Couples' (Journal of Labor Economics).
Additional affiliations
March 2008 - September 2013
Technische Universität Dortmund
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (25)
Article
Covid‐19 induced job losses occurred predominantly in industries with intensive worker–client interaction as well as in pink‐collar and blue‐collar occupations. We study the ability of fiscal policy to stabilize employment by occupation and industry during the Covid‐19 crisis. We use a multisector, multioccupation macro‐economic model and investiga...
Article
Full-text available
We document that the employment effects of financial aid to US states during the Great Recession were strongly unevenly distributed across sectors, the construction sector being the main beneficiary. State fiscal relief not only preserved a substantial number of jobs but it also fostered employment most strongly in the sectors hit hardest by the re...
Article
Estimated fiscal multipliers for the US are typically moderate, despite evidence of the Fed lowering, rather than raising, interest rates after government spending hikes. We rationalize these puzzling observations building on the imperfect substitutability of assets. We find that interest rates important for private borrowing/saving do not follow t...
Article
We document substantial heterogeneity in occupational employment dynamics in response to government spending shocks in the United States. Employment rises most strongly in service, sales, and office (“pink‐collar”) occupations. By contrast, employment in blue‐collar occupations is hardly affected by fiscal policy. We provide evidence that occupatio...
Article
Recessions are man-cessions, as men are disproportionately exposed to cyclical employment fluctuations. We provide evidence that fiscal expansions stimulate predominantly female employment implying a further destabilization of the gender composition of employment in recessions. Our findings can be understood as a consequence of differences in the i...
Article
We examine differences in employment dynamics across population groups using Bayesian vector autoregressions. We document that groups who are particularly strongly affected by business-cycle fluctuations (males, young people, non-whites, the less educated, and workers in blue-collar occupations) also tend to be affected early in the build-up of a b...
Article
In recessions, predominantly men lose their jobs, which has given rise to the term ”mancessions”. We analyze whether fiscal expansions bring men back into jobs. To do so, we estimate vector-autoregressive models and identify the effects of fiscal shocks and non-fiscal shocks on the gender composition of employment. We show that contractionary non-f...
Article
Standard models of voting on redistribution generate a clear-cut prediction: redistribution increases in income skewness. (the Meltzer-Richard hypothesis) Empirical evidence on this issue is mixed. Changes in income skewness are often accompanied by developments in redistribution into the opposite direction. This paper argues that it is important t...
Article
We use Bayesian VARs to analyze differences in employment dynamics across population groups in the US. The employment of males, young people, non-whites, the less educated, and workers in blue-collar occupations fluctuates more heavily. We further document across-group differences in the timing of employment reactions to business-cycle shocks. Grou...
Article
This paper studies gender differences in the elasticity of labor supply in a model of household specialization. We show that household specialization implies larger Frisch elasticities for the partner that specializes in home production. Quantitatively, empirical time-use ratios alone imply differences in the Frisch elasticity between women and men...
Article
This paper investigates married women’s hours worked disaggregated by the husband’s wage decile. In the United States, this pattern has changed from downward sloping to hump shaped. We show that this development can be explained within a standard household model of labor supply when taking into account trends in assortative mating. A quantitative a...
Article
Welfare-state measures often tend to persist even when they seem to have become suboptimal due to changes in the economic environment. This paper proposes an information-based explanation for this welfare-state persistence. I present a structural model where rationally inattentive voters decide upon implementations and removals of social insurance....
Article
Welfare-state measures often tend to persist even when they seem to have become suboptimal due to changes in the economic environment. This paper proposes an information-based explanation for the persistence of the welfare state. I present a structural model where rationally inattentive voters decide upon implementations and removals of social insu...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates the pattern of wives' hours disaggregated by the husband's wage decile. In the US, this pattern has changed from downward-sloping to hump-shaped. We show that this development can be explained within a standard household model of labor supply when taking into account trends in assortative mating. We develop a model in which...
Article
Full-text available
We propose a new explanation for differences and changes in labor supply by gender and marital status, and in particular for the increase in married women's labor supply over time. We argue that this increase as well as the relative constancy of other groups' hours are optimal reactions to outsourcing labor in home production becoming more attracti...

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