Chrisna Swart

Chrisna Swart
Neurozone · Coaching Solutions

Ph.D
Train and support certified coaches in integrating the principles of behavioral neuroscience into coaching practice

About

11
Publications
5,045
Reads
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176
Citations
Citations since 2017
3 Research Items
127 Citations
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2017201820192020202120222023051015202530
Additional affiliations
August 2020 - July 2021
Neurozone
Position
  • Head of Department
Description
  • Head of operations of the division Coaching Solutions at Neurozone Facilitate the Neurozone Advanced Certification Course for Coaches Train certified business, executive and life coaches in integrating the principles of behavioral neuroscience into coaching practice
January 2019 - August 2019
The African Cancer Institute
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Writing of annual reports and other research articles.
January 2017 - August 2020
Self-Employed
Position
  • Neurocoach
Description
  • Through the teaching and application of integrative behavioral neuroscience, clients include both patients with neurological or chronic conditions, as well as healthy individuals aiming to achieve overall wellness, resilience, improved performance and improved quality of life.
Education
January 2018 - February 2018
Neurozone
Field of study
  • Neuroscience Coaching
January 2017 - July 2017
University of Cape Town Centre for Coaching
Field of study
  • Integral Coaching
January 2009 - December 2011
Stellenbosch University
Field of study
  • Medical Biochemistry - Neuroscience

Publications

Publications (11)
Article
Full-text available
Objective: Autophagic maintenance of protein turnover for neuronal homeostasis is of critical importance. Although autophagy dysfunction contributes to neurodegenerative pathology, it remains unclear why certain brain regions are initially targeted compared to others. In Alzheimer's disease, the hippocampus appears to be most severely and initially...
Chapter
The fine control of neuronal proteostasis is an essential element that preserves cell viability. Advancing age is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and autophagy is thought to dictate normal and pathological aging through intricate molecular machinery controlling protein aggregation. Although the role of autophagy dysfunction in AD...
Article
For a considerable time cell death has been considered to represent mutually exclusive states with cell death modalities that are governed by their inherent and unique mode of action involving specific molecular entities and have therefore been studied primarily in isolation. It is now, however, becoming increasingly clear that these modalities are...
Article
Full-text available
Mutations in the parkin gene are the most common cause of early-onset Parkinson’s disease (PD). Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in respiratory chain function, mitophagy, and mitochondrial dynamics. Human cellular models with parkin null mutations are particularly valuable for investigating the mitochondrial functions of parkin. However,...
Article
Full-text available
The aggregation of misfolded proteins has long been regarded as a pathological event in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease. However, the exact molecular mechanisms that govern protein metabolism that may lead to toxicity remain largely unclear. Originally targeted as the causative ag...
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson's disease (PD), defined as a neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra in the midbrain. Loss-of-function mutations in the parkin gene are a major cause of autosomal recessive, early-onset PD. Parkin has been implicated in the maintenance of healthy mitochondria, although previ...
Article
Despite in vitro demonstrations of non-enzymatic morphogenetic functions in acetylcholinesterase (AChE), the AChE knockout phenotype is milder than might be expected, casting doubt upon the relevance of such functions in vivo. Functional redundancy is a possible explanation. Using in vitro findings that AChE is able to bind to laminin-111, together...
Article
Full-text available
Although the primary function of AChE (acetylcholinesterase) is the synaptic hydrolysis of acetylcholine, it appears that the protein is also able to promote various non-cholinergic activities, including cell adhesion, neurite outgrowth and amyloidosis. We have observed previously that AChE is able to bind to mouse laminin-111 in vitro by an electr...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
High and low autophagic fluxes will be induced in mouse brain using Intraperitoneal injections. What is the best method of fixation to use in order to dissect brain areas of interest afterwards? What is the best method of sacrifice to preserve tissue of interest. Should sacrifice commence before or after fixation?

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