Chris Jiggins

Chris Jiggins
University of Cambridge | Cam · Department of Zoology

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645
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Publications

Publications (645)
Article
Heliconius erato is a neotropical butterfly species that is part of a complex mimicry ring, with colorful wing patterns. For intraspecific communication, males use pheromones that are released from two different scent-emitting structures. Scent glands located near the abdominal claspers of males, containing antiaphrodisiac pheromones, release a hig...
Preprint
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Colour is often used as an aposematic warning signal, with predator learning expected to lead to a single colour pattern within a population. However, there are many puzzling cases where aposematic signals are also polymorphic. The wood tiger moth, Arctia plantaginis , uses bright hindwing colours as a signal of unpalatability, and males have discr...
Preprint
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Despite insertions and deletions being the most common structural variants (SVs) found across genomes, not much is known about how much these SVs vary within populations and between closely related species, nor their significance in evolution. To address these questions, we characterized the evolution of indel SVs using genome assemblies of three c...
Article
As the genetic basis of natural and domesticated variation has been described in recent years, a number of hotspot genes have been repeatedly identified as the targets of selection, Heliconius butterflies display a spectacular diversity of pattern variants in the wild and the genetic basis of these patterns has been well-described. Here we sought t...
Preprint
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Repeated evolution can provide insight into the mechanisms that facilitate adaptation to novel or changing environments. Here we study adaptation to high altitude in two divergent tropical butterflies, H. erato and H. melpomene, which have repeatedly and independently adapted to high elevations on either side of the Andean mountains. We sequenced 5...
Preprint
Captive populations often harbor variation that is not present in the wild due to artificial selection. Recent efforts to map this variation have provided insights into the genetic and molecular basis of variation. Heliconius butterflies display a large array of pattern variants in the wild and the genetic basis of these patterns has been well-desc...
Article
Full-text available
The global increase in species richness toward the tropics across continents and taxonomic groups, referred to as the latitudinal diversity gradient, stimulated the formulation of many hypotheses to explain the underlying mechanisms of this pattern. We evaluate several of these hypotheses to explain spatial diversity patterns in a butterfly family,...
Article
The butterfly Heliconius erato occurs in various mimetic morphs. The male clasper scent gland releases an anti‐aphrodisiac pheromone and additionally contains a complex mixture of up to 350 components, varying between individuals. In 114 samples of five different mimicry groups and their hybrids 750 different compounds were detected by gas chromato...
Article
Full-text available
In Heliconius butterflies, wing colour pattern diversity and scale types are controlled by a few genes of large effect that regulate colour pattern switches between morphs and species across a large mimetic radiation. One of these genes, cortex, has been repeatedly associated with colour pattern evolution in butterflies. Here we carried out CRISPR...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding how organisms adapt to their local environment is central to evolution. With new whole‐genome sequencing technologies and the explosion of data, deciphering the genomic basis of complex traits that are ecologically relevant is becoming increasingly feasible. Here we study the genomic basis of wing shape in two Neotropical butterflies...
Article
Full-text available
Genetic variation segregates as linked sets of variants or haplotypes. Haplotypes and linkage are central to genetics and underpin virtually all genetic and selection analysis. Yet, genomic data often omit haplotype information due to constraints in sequencing technologies. Here, we present “haplotagging,” a simple, low-cost linked-read sequencing...
Article
Full-text available
Chemical defences against predators underlie the evolution of aposematic coloration and mimicry, which are classic examples of adaptive evolution. Surprisingly little is known about the roles of ecological and evolutionary processes maintaining defence variation, and how they may feedback to shape the evolutionary dynamics of species. Cyanogenic He...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding patterns of population differentiation and gene flow in insect vectors of plant diseases is crucial for the implementation of management programs of disease. We investigated morphological and genome-wide variation across the distribution range of the spittlebug Philaenus spumarius (Linnaeus, 1758) (Hemiptera, Auchenorrhyncha, Aphropho...
Article
Studies of invasive species can simultaneously inform management strategies and quantify rapid evolution in the wild. The role of genomics in invasion science is increasingly recognised, and the growing availability of reference genomes for invasive species is paving the way for whole-genome resequencing studies in a wide range of systems. Here, we...
Article
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Background: The black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) is the most promising insect candidate for nutrient-recycling through bioconversion of organic waste into biomass, thereby improving sustainability of protein supplies for animal feed and facilitating transition to a circular economy. Contrary to conventional livestock, genetic resources of farm...
Article
Full-text available
Background The black soldier fly (Hermetia illucens) is the most promising insect candidate for nutrient-recycling through bioconversion of organic waste into biomass, thereby improving sustainability of protein supplies for animal feed and facilitating transition to a circular economy. Contrary to conventional livestock, genetic resources of farme...
Article
Full-text available
How frequent is gene flow between species? The pattern of evolution is typically portrayed as a phylogenetic tree, yet gene flow between good species may be an important mechanism in diversification, spreading adaptive traits and leading to a complex pattern of phylogenetic incongruence. This process has thus far been studied mainly among a few clo...
Article
Full-text available
A Correction to this paper has been published: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41586-021-03330-8.
Article
Full-text available
Hermetia illucens L. (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), the Black Soldier Fly (BSF) is an increasingly important species for bioconversion of organic material into animal feed. We generated a high-quality chromosome-scale genome assembly of the BSF using Pacific Bioscience, 10X Genomics linked read and high-throughput chromosome conformation capture sequenc...
Article
Host plant specialization is a major force driving ecological niche partitioning and diversification in insect herbivores. The cyanogenic defences of Passiflora plants keep most herbivores at bay, but not the larvae of Heliconiu s butterflies, which can both sequester and biosynthesize cyanogenic compounds. Here, we demonstrate that both Heliconius...
Article
Full-text available
Plants and insects often use the same compounds for chemical communication, but not much is known about the genetics of convergent evolution of chemical signals. The terpene ( E )-β-ocimene is a common component of floral scent and is also used by the butterfly Heliconius melpomene as an anti-aphrodisiac pheromone. While the biosynthesis of terpene...
Preprint
By studying invasive species, evolutionary geneticists have been able to simultaneously inform management strategies and quantify rapid evolution in the wild. The role of genomics in invasion science is increasingly recognised, and the growing availability of reference genomes for invasive species is paving the way for whole-genome resequencing stu...
Article
Full-text available
The degree to which loci promoting reproductive isolation cluster in the genome—that is, the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation—can influence the tempo and mode of speciation. Tight linkage between these loci can facilitate speciation in the face of gene flow. Pheromones play a role in reproductive isolation in many Lepidoptera species,...
Preprint
Full-text available
Understanding how organisms adapt to their local environment is central to evolution. With new whole-genome sequencing technologies and the explosion of data, deciphering the genomic basis of complex traits that are ecologically relevant is becoming increasingly feasible. Here we study the genomic basis of wing shape in two Neotropical butterflies...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Hermetia illucens L. (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), the Black Soldier Fly (BSF) is an increasingly important mass reared entomological resource for bioconversion of organic material into animal feed. Results We generated a high-quality chromosome-scale genome assembly of the BSF using Pacific Bioscience, 10X Genomics linked read and high-thr...
Preprint
Full-text available
Forests are a mosaic of light spectra, and colour signal efficiency might change in different light environments. Local adaptation in Heliconius butterflies is linked to microhabitat use and the colourful wing colour patterns may be adapted for signalling in different light environments. These toxic butterflies exhibit conspicuous colours as a warn...
Article
Full-text available
Many animal species remain separate not because their individuals fail to produce viable hybrids but because they "choose" not to mate. However, we still know very little of the genetic mechanisms underlying changes in these mate preference behaviours. Heliconius butterflies display bright warning patterns, which they also use to recognize conspeci...
Article
Convergent evolution can occur through different genetic mechanisms in different species. It is now clear that convergence at the genetic level is also widespread, and can be caused by either i) parallel genetic evolution, where independently evolved convergent mutations arise in different populations or species, or ii) collateral evolution in whic...
Article
Full-text available
Background Diploid genome assembly is typically impeded by heterozygosity because it introduces errors when haplotypes are collapsed into a consensus sequence. Trio binning offers an innovative solution that exploits heterozygosity for assembly. Short, parental reads are used to assign parental origin to long reads from their F1 offspring before as...
Cover Page
Full-text available
Pictured is a postman butterfly (Heliconius melpomene rosina) perched on a leaf. Bas van Schooten, Jesyka Meléndez-Rosa, et al. uncovered sensory tissue gene-expression profiles in a pair of recently diverged butterfly species, H. melpomene rosina and Heliconius cydno chioneus, and identified candidate genes involved in chemical signal recognition,...
Article
Full-text available
Chemosensory communication is essential to insect biology, playing indispensable roles during mate-finding, foraging, and oviposition behaviors. These traits are particularly important during speciation, where chemical perception may serve to establish species barriers. However, identifying genes associated with such complex behavioral traits remai...
Preprint
Full-text available
The degree to which loci promoting reproductive isolation cluster in the genome - i.e. the genetic architecture of reproductive isolation - can influence the tempo and mode of speciation. Tight linkage between these loci can facilitate speciation in the face of gene flow. Pheromones play a role in reproductive isolation in many Lepidoptera species,...
Preprint
Full-text available
The wing patterns of butterflies are an excellent system with which to study phenotypic evolution. The incredibly diverse patterns are generated from an array of pigmented scales on a largely two dimensional surface, resulting in a visibly tractable system for studying the evolution of pigmentation. In Heliconius butterflies, much of this diversity...
Preprint
Full-text available
Genetic variation segregates as linked sets of variants, or haplotypes. Haplotypes and linkage are central to genetics and underpin virtually all genetic and selection analysis. And yet, genomic data often lack haplotype information, due to constraints in sequencing technologies. Here we present “haplotagging”, a simple, low-cost linked-read sequen...
Article
Full-text available
Colour pattern is the main trait that drives mate recognition between Heliconius species that are phylogenetically close. However, when this cue is compromised such as in cases of mimetic, sympatric and closely related species, alternative mating signals must evolve to ensure reproductive isolation and species integrity. The closely related species...
Article
Coloration is an easily quantifiable visual trait that has proven to be a highly tractable system for genetic analysis and for studying adaptive evolution. The application of genomic approaches to evolutionary studies of coloration is providing new insight into the genetic architectures underlying colour traits, including the importance of large-ef...
Article
An amendment to this paper has been published and can be accessed via a link at the top of the paper.
Article
Full-text available
Hybridization between invasive and native species has raised global concern, given the dramatic increase in species range shifts and pest outbreaks due to anthropogenic dispersal. Nevertheless, secondary contact between sister lineages of local and invasive species provides a natural laboratory to understand the factors that determine introgression...
Preprint
Full-text available
The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is arguably one of the most striking patterns in nature. The global increase in species richness toward the tropics across continents and taxonomic groups stimulated the formulation of many hypotheses to explain the underlying mechanisms of this pattern. We evaluated several of these hypotheses to explain sp...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hostplant specialization is a major force driving ecological niche partitioning and diversification in insect herbivores. The cyanogenic defences of Passiflora plants keeps most herbivores at bay, but not larvae of Heliconius butterflies, which can both sequester and biosynthesize cyanogenic compounds. Here, we demonstrate that both Heliconius cydn...
Article
Hybridization can generate novel phenotypes distinct from those of parental lineages, a phenomenon known as transgressive trait variation. Transgressive phenotypes might negatively or positively affect hybrid fitness, and increase available variation. Closely related species of Heliconius butterflies regularly produce hybrids in nature and hybridiz...
Article
Full-text available
In many animals, mate choice is important for the maintenance of reproductive isolation between species. Traits important for mate choice and behavioral isolation are predicted to be under strong stabilizing selection within species; however, such traits can also exhibit variation at the population level driven by neutral and adaptive evolutionary...
Preprint
Full-text available
Divergence in mating behaviors plays a major role during speciation, but we know little about the genetic mechanisms underlying the evolution of such traits. Reproductive isolation between the Neotropical butterflies Heliconius melpomene and H. cydno depends on shifts in mimetic warning patterns, which also act as mating cues. Preferences for consp...
Article
Full-text available
Microclimatic variability in tropical forests plays a key role in shaping species distributions and their ability to cope with environmental change, especially for ectotherms. Nonetheless, currently available climatic datasets lack data from the forest interior and, furthermore, our knowledge of thermal tolerance among tropical ectotherms is limite...
Preprint
Full-text available
Background Diploid genome assembly is typically impeded by heterozygosity, as it introduces errors when haplotypes are collapsed into a consensus sequence. Trio binning offers an innovative solution which exploits heterozygosity for assembly. Short, parental reads are used to assign parental origin to long reads from their F1 offspring before assem...
Article
Full-text available
Neo-sex chromosomes are found in many taxa, but the forces driving their emergence and spread are poorly understood. The female-specific neo-W chromosome of the African monarch (or queen) butterfly Danaus chrysippus presents an intriguing case study because it is restricted to a single ‘contact zone’ population, involves a putative colour patternin...
Article
The persistence of distinct warning signals within and between sympatric mimetic communities is a puzzling evolutionary question because selection favours convergence of colour patterns among toxic species. Such convergence is partly shaped by predators' reaction to similar but not identical stimulus (i.e. generalization behaviour), and generalizat...
Article
Full-text available
Natural selection leaves distinct signatures in the genome that can reveal the targets and history of adaptive evolution. By analysing high-coverage genome sequence data from 4 major colour pattern loci sampled from nearly 600 individuals in 53 populations, we show pervasive selection on wing patterns in the Heliconius adaptive radiation. The stron...
Preprint
Full-text available
Chemical defences against predators underlie the evolution of aposematic coloration and mimicry, which represent classic examples of adaptive evolution. Yet, unlike color patterns, little is known about the evolutionary potential of chemical defences. Neotropical Heliconius butterflies exhibit incredibly diverse warning color patterns and widesprea...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the production, response, and genetics of signals used in mate choice can inform our understanding of the evolution of both intraspecific mate choice and reproductive isolation. Sex pheromones are important for courtship and mate choice in many insects, but we know relatively little of their role in butterflies. The butterfly Heliconi...
Preprint
Full-text available
Microclimatic variability in tropical forests plays a key role in shaping species distributions and their ability to cope with environmental change, especially for ectotherms. Yet, currently available climatic datasets lack data from the forest interior and our knowledge of thermal tolerance among tropical ectotherms is limited. To tackle this, we...
Preprint
Full-text available
Hybridization between invasive and native species has raised global concern given the dramatic increase in species range shifts and pest outbreaks due to climate change, development of suitable agroecosystems, and anthropogenic dispersal. Nevertheless, secondary contact between sister lineages of local and invasive species provides a natural labora...
Article
To what extent can we predict how evolution occurs? Do genetic architectures and developmental processes canalize the evolution of similar outcomes in a predictable manner? Or do historical contingencies impose alternative pathways to answer the same challenge? Examples of Müllerian mimicry between distantly related butterfly species provide natura...
Preprint
Full-text available
Colour pattern has been long recognised as the trait that drives mate recognition between Heliconius species that are phylogenetically close. However, when this cue is compromised such as in cases of mimetic, sympatric and closely related species, alternative mating signals must evolve to ensure reproductive isolation and species integrity. The clo...
Article
We used 20 de novo genome assemblies to probe the speciation history and architecture of gene flow in rapidly radiating Heliconius butterflies. Our tests to distinguish incomplete lineage sorting from introgression indicate that gene flow has obscured several ancient phylogenetic relationships in this group over large swathes of the genome. Introgr...
Article
Full-text available
Phenotypic divergence between closely related species has long interested biologists. Taxa that inhabit a range of environments and have diverse natural histories can help understand how selection drives phenotypic divergence. In butterflies, wing colour patterns have been extensively studied but diversity in wing shape and size is less well unders...
Article
Full-text available
Background Sex ratio distorting agents (maternally inherited symbionts and meiotically-driving sex chromosomes) are common in insects. When these agents rise to high frequencies they create strong population sex ratio bias and selection then favours mutations that act to restore the rare sex. Despite this strong selection pressure, the evolution of...
Preprint
Full-text available
Terpenes, a group of structurally diverse compounds, are the biggest class of secondary metabolites. While the biosynthesis of terpenes by enzymes known as terpene synthases (TPSs) has been described in plants and microorganisms, few TPSs have been identified in insects, despite the presence of terpenes in multiple insect species. Indeed, in many i...
Article
Full-text available
Evolutionary biologists are increasingly using population genetic variation across genomes to address questions around the origin and ongoing evolution of species. Patterns of differentiation between closely related species are highly variable across the genome, and a wide variety of processes contribute to that variation. There is an emerging patt...
Preprint
Full-text available
Pheromones are important for courtship and mate choice in many insects, but we know relatively little of their role in butterflies. The butterfly Heliconius melpomene uses a complex blend of wing androconial compounds during courtship. Electroantennography in H. melpomene and its close relative H. cydno showed that responses to androconial extracts...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Many traits evolve by cis-regulatory modification, by which changes to noncoding sequences affect the binding affinity for available transcription factors and thus modify the expression profile of genes. Multiple examples of cis-regulatory evolution have been described at pattern switch genes responsible for butterfly wing pattern poly...