Chris Darimont

Chris Darimont
University of Victoria | UVIC · Department of Geography

Associate Professor

About

129
Publications
40,545
Reads
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3,826
Citations
Citations since 2016
60 Research Items
2726 Citations
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Introduction
I am an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography, University of Victoria. My team and I conduct applied and conservation-oriented interdisciplinary work that draws upon ecology, evolutionary biology, wildlife management, geography, ethics, and policy. We work in the field with wildlife, and partner with Indigenous nations. We also enjoy analytical, modeling, and policy work that draw on available data from the literature, online databases and other sources.
Additional affiliations
July 2012 - present
University of Victoria, Raincoast Conservation Fdn, & Hakai Institute
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (129)
Article
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Although species richness can be determined by different mechanisms at different spatial scales, the role of scale in the effects of marine inputs on island biogeography has not been studied explicitly. Here, we evaluated the potential influence of island characteristics and marine inputs (seaweed wrack biomass and marine-derived nitrogen in the so...
Article
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Incorporating genetic considerations into wildlife management can require balancing the conservation of rare genetic variants with the maintenance of gene flow. One system illustrating such trade‐offs is coastal British Columbia, Canada, where black bears (Ursus americanus) can carry a genetic variant responsible for white‐coated “Spirit bears.” We...
Article
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Although marine subsidies often enrich terrestrial ecosystems, their influence is known to be context-dependent. Additionally, the multitrophic impact of marine subsidies has not been traced through food webs across physically diverse islands. Here, we test predictions about how island characteristics can affect marine enrichment of food web consti...
Article
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Coastal shell midden deposits are a quintessential component of the archaeological record on the Pacific Northwest Coast. Despite their importance in informing the cultural and environmental histories of Indigenous peoples, research on shell middens has largely not sought to address the physical extent of these cultural deposits, which requires est...
Article
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Abstract Local people can act as sentinels for change, especially for wildlife populations not monitored by centralized governments. Responding to concern expressed by the Kitasoo Xai'xais (KX) First Nation over a decline in mountain goat (Oreamnos americanus) sightings, our community‐academic partnership assessed the conservation status of goats i...
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Marine‐derived resource subsidies can generate intrapopulation variation in the behaviors and diets of terrestrial consumers. How omnivores respond, given their multiple trophic interactions, is not well understood. We sampled mice (Peromyscus keeni) and their food sources at five sites on three islands of the Central Coast of British Columbia, Can...
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Indigenous Knowledge (IK) is the collective term to represent the many place‐based knowledges accumulated across generations within myriad specific cultural contexts. Despite its millennia‐long and continued application by Indigenous peoples to environmental management, non‐Indigenous “Western” scientific research and management have only recently...
Article
The importance of disturbance Work in sea otters over the last few decades has transformed our understanding of the importance of specific species, or keystones, as drivers of community structure and stability. Foster et al . took the next step and tested whether otter foraging might influence genetic diversity in an eelgrass ecosystem (see the Per...
Article
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• Parasites are integral to ecosystem functioning yet often overlooked. Improved understanding of host–parasite associations is important, particularly for wide-ranging species for which host range shifts and climate change could alter host–parasite interactions and their effects on ecosystem function. • Among the most widely distributed mammals wi...
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Worldwide, unsustainable use of nature threatens many ecosystems and the services they provide for a broad diversity of life, including humans. Yet, governments commonly claim that the best available science supports their policies governing extraction of natural resources. We confront this apparent paradox by assessing the complexity of the inters...
Article
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Foraging niche variation within a species can contribute to the maintenance of phenotypic diversity. The multiniche model posits that phenotypes occupying different niches can contribute to the maintenance of balanced polymorphisms. Using coastal populations of black bears (Ursus americanus kermodei) from British Columbia, Canada, we examined poten...
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Environmental management and monitoring must reconcile social and cultural objectives with biodiversity stewardship to overcome political barriers to conservation. Suitability modelling offers a powerful tool for such “biocultural” approaches, but examples remain rare. Led by the Stewardship Authority of the Kitasoo/Xai’xais First Nation in coastal...
Article
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1. Preserving genetic and phenotypic diversity can help safeguard not only biodiversity but also cultural and economic values. 2. Here, we present data that emerged from Indigenous‐led research at the intersection of evolution and ecology to support conservation planning of a culturally salient, economically valuable, and rare phenotypic variant. W...
Article
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Increasingly, fisheries researchers and managers seek or are compelled to “bridge” Indigenous knowledge systems with Western scientific approaches to understanding and governing fisheries. Here, we move beyond the all-too-common narrative about integrating or incorporating (too often used as euphemisms for assimilating) other knowledge systems into...
Article
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The social license to operate framework considers how society grants or withholds informal permission for resource extractors to exploit publicly owned resources. We developed a modified model, which we refer to as the social license to hunt (SLH). In it we similarly consider hunters as operators, given that wildlife are legally considered public r...
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Domestic dogs are frequently encountered in Indigenous archaeological sites on the Northwest Coast of North America. Although dogs depended on human communities for care and provisioning, archaeologists lack information about the specific foods dogs consumed. Previous research has used stable isotope analysis of dog diets for insight into human sub...
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Indigenous peoples and their leadership remain steadfast in their commitment to manage and protect ancestral lands and waters throughout the world. In this regard, the landscape currently known as the central coast of British Columbia, Canada represents a complex and dynamic site of collaboration, negotiation, and conflict, as Indigenous leaders as...
Article
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Mountain caribou, a behaviourally and genetically distinct set of ecotypes of the Woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) restricted to the mountains of western Canada, have undergone severe population declines in recent decades. Although a broad consensus exists that the ultimate driver of these declines has been the reduction of habitat upon...
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[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.3000193.].
Article
Although disease dynamics of prey are influenced by predator behaviour, little is known about the potential effects of wide-ranging post-industrial hunters. Mysterud et al. describe the movement behaviour of Norwegian hunters using more than 165,000 hunting records from 2001–2017, showing that hunters migrate to and from areas of high prey density,...
Article
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The classical theory of island biogeography, which predicts species richness using island area and isolation, has been expanded to include contributions from marine subsidies, i.e. subsidized island biogeography (SIB) theory. We tested the effects of marine subsidies on species diversity and population density on productive temperate islands, evalu...
Article
Policy-makers ideally pursue well-informed, socially just means to make environmental decisions. Indigenous peoples have used Indigenous knowledge (IK) to inform decisions about environmental management for millennia. In the last 50 years, many western societies have used environmental assessment (EA) processes to deliberate on industrial proposals...
Article
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Environmental management (EM) requires indicators to inform objectives and monitor the impacts or efficacy of management practices. One common approach uses "functional ecological" indicators, which are typically species whose presence or abundance are tied to functional ecological processes, such as nutrient productivity and availability, trophic...
Article
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Hunters often target species that require resource investment disproportionate to associated nutritional rewards. Costly signalling theory provides a potential explanation, proposing that hunters target species that impose high costs (e.g. higher failure and injury risks, lower consumptive returns) because it signals an ability to absorb costly beh...
Article
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British Columbia has the greatest biological diversity of any province or territory in Canada. Yet increasing numbers of species in British Columbia are threatened with extinction. The current patchwork of provincial laws and regulations has not effectively prevented species declines. Recently, the Provincial Government has committed to enacting an...
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Despite abundant focus on responsible care of laboratory animals, we argue that inattention to the maltreatment of wildlife constitutes an ethical blind spot in contemporary animal research. We begin by reviewing significant shortcomings in legal and institutional oversight, arguing for the relatively rapid and transformational potential of editori...
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Resource waves—spatial variation in resource phenology that extends feeding opportunities for mobile consumers—can affect the behaviour and productivity of recipient populations. Interspecific diversity among Pacific salmon species (Oncorhynchus spp.) creates staggered spawning events across space and time, thereby prolonging availability to terres...
Technical Report
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British Columbia has the greatest biological diversity of any province or territory in Canada. Yet more and more species in British Columbia are threatened with extinction and require active measures for protection and recovery. The current patchwork of provincial laws and regulations managing wildlife and their habitats has not effectively prevent...
Article
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Mawdsley et al. (2018) respond disapprovingly to our 2018 review of 667 wildlife management systems across Canada and the United States, which found that many of these systems lacked the scientific hallmarks of clear objectives, evidence, transparency, and independent review. Although we strongly agree with several of Mawdsley et al.’s points about...
Article
Macroalgae and seagrasses form the base of productive ecosystems in the Northeastern Pacific Ocean. Often, ecological research on macroalgae, seagrasses, and sea wrack requires the conversion of biomass from wet to dry to create consistency across investigations. This process, however, can be destructive, impractical, time consuming, and labour int...
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Here we assess admixture during natural re-colonization and the resulting distribution of genetic variation based on mitochondrial haplotypes and 18,508 neutral nuclear SNPs. We utilize niche modelling to define ecotype boundaries and find little correspondence with genetic partitions that may reflect recent colonization from multiple sources. The...
Article
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The original Article mistakenly coded the constitutional rights of Australia as containing a governmental duty to protect the environment (blue in the figures); this has been corrected to containing no explicit mention of environmental protection (orange in the figures). The original Article also neglected to code the constitutional rights of the C...
Article
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Trophy hunting has occupied a prominent position in recent scholarly literature and popular media. In the scientific conservation literature, researchers are generally supportive of or sympathetic to its usage as a source of monetary support for conservation. Although authors at times acknowledge that trophy hunting faces strong opposition from man...
Article
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Resource management agencies commonly defend controversial policy by claiming adherence to science-based approaches. For example, proponents and practitioners of the “North American Model of Wildlife Conservation,” which guides hunting policy across much of the United States and Canada, assert that science plays a central role in shaping policy. Ho...
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Article impact statement: Reporting of population data and associated policies are prone to political influence.
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Intergenerational rights to a healthy environment are protected by the constitutions of 75% of the world’s nations. These explicit commitments and similar, ancient principles of sovereign public trust are often overlooked but, if enforced, they o er sustainable protection for the biosphere.
Article
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Measuring rates and causes of mortalities is important in animal ecology and management. Observing the fates of known individuals is a common method of estimating life history variables, including mortality patterns. It has long been assumed that data lost when known animals disappear were unbiased. We test and reject this assumption under conditio...
Article
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Understanding hunter satisfactions can lead to improved wildlife management policy and practice. Whereas previous work has suggested that hunters often seek multiple satisfactions (achievement, affiliation, appreciation), little is known about how satisfactions might vary with target species. Additionally, past research has mostly gathered data usi...
Article
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This letter was submitted by several scientists across North America in reply to a response from Alberta's S. Boutin regarding killing wolves under the guise of caribou recovery.
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2017. Intrapopulation diversity in isotopic niche over landscapes: Spatial patterns inform conservation of bear–salmon systems. Ecosphere 8(6): Abstract. Intrapopulation variability in resource acquisition (i.e., niche variation) influences population dynamics, with important implications for conservation planning. Spatial analyses of niche variati...
Article
Landscape regionalization approaches are frequently used to summarize and visualize complex spatial patterns, environmental factors, and disturbance regimes. However, landscapes are dynamic and contemporary regionalization approaches based on spatial patterns often do not account for the temporal component that may provide important insight on dist...
Article
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The killing of Cecil the lion ( Panthera leo ) ignited enduring and increasingly global discussion about trophy hunting [[1][1]]. Yet, policy debate about its benefits and costs (e.g. [[2][2],[3][3]]) focuses only on the hunted species and biodiversity, not the unique behaviour of hunters. Some
Article
In our recent perspective article, we noted that most (approximately 0 percent) terrestrial large carnivore and large herbivore species are now threatened with extinction, and we offered a 13-point declaration designed to promote and guide actions to save these iconic mammalian megafauna (Ripple et al. 2016). Some may worry that a focus on saving m...
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Background Overexploitation and persecution of large carnivores resulting from conflict with humans comprise major causes of declines worldwide. Although little is known about the interplay between these mortality types, hunting of predators remains a common management strategy aimed at reducing predator-human conflict. Emerging theory and data, ho...
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From the late Pleistocene to the Holocene and now the so-called Anthropocene, humans have been driving an ongoing series of species declines and extinctions (Dirzo et al. 2014). Large-bodied mammals are typically at a higher risk of extinction than smaller ones (Cardillo et al. 2005). However, in some circumstances, terrestrial megafauna population...
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Human-wildlife conflicts impose considerable costs to people and wildlife worldwide. Most research focuses on proximate causes, offering limited generalizable understanding of ultimate drivers. We tested three competing hypotheses (problem individuals, regional population saturation, limited food supply) that relate to underlying processes of human...
Article
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Advances in GPS telemetry and remote sensing technologies provide researchers with abundant data that can be used to investigate detailed questions about wildlife behavior. Existing methods for linking wildlife movement to remotely sensed landscape data generally rely on the application of subjectively derived distance thresholds to represent proxi...
Article
Despite its manifold implications, insight into what satisfactions hunters derive from trophy hunting has not been thoroughly investigated. We used a novel method to assess how common satisfaction might be from harvesting animals under different achievement contexts. We scored smile types—signals of emotion and satisfaction—in 2,791 online hunting...
Article
Paradigms of sustainable exploitation focus on population dynamics of prey and yields to humanity but ignore the behavior of humans as predators. We compared patterns of predation by contemporary hunters and fishers with those of other predators that compete over shared prey (terrestrial mammals and marine fishes). Our global survey (2125 estimates...
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To reduce predation on a woodland caribou ( Rangifer tarandus caribou ) population threatened by industrial disturbance, a recent study in Alberta (Canada) used strychnine baits to kill wolves ( Canis lupus ). Strychnine should not be used to control wolves because it is: (1) inhumane; (2) in contravention of animal welfare guidelines; and (3) non-...
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Many species at risk in Canada and globally are at or approaching a crisis, especially where little or nothing consequential is being done to prevent extirpation. Such is the case of endangered boreal caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) in southern Alberta, Canada. Expedient but inadequate emergency ‘fixes’ have been experimentally implemented to a...