Chris Cocklin

Chris Cocklin
James Cook University · Chancellery

PhD

About

129
Publications
39,889
Reads
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4,958
Citations
Citations since 2016
5 Research Items
2486 Citations
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20162017201820192020202120220100200300400
Introduction
Research interests are in resources and environmental policy, agriculture and rural communities, global environmental change, sustainable development, and corporate environmental management.
Additional affiliations
February 2007 - present
James Cook University
Position
  • Senior Deputy Vice Chancellor
February 1997 - February 2007
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Professor
February 1997 - February 2007
Monash University (Australia)
Position
  • Professor (Full)

Publications

Publications (129)
Article
Institutional change is fundamental to regime transformation, and a necessary part of moving towards integrated water management. However, insight into the role of institutional change processes in such transitions is currently limited. A more nuanced understanding of institutional frameworks is necessary, both to advance understanding of instituti...
Article
Full-text available
Even though traditional urban water management practices have been deemed as unsustainable, lacking resilience and ill-equipped to deal with the challenges of the twenty-first century, they continue to dominate urban water management sectors worldwide. This lock-in is rooted in the institutional building blocks of urban water management sectors whi...
Chapter
The theme of the World-Class Universities Conference in 2015 was visibility and how it interacts with performance. Imbedded within the overarching conference theme were questions as to whether universities can be both globally visible and locally engaged, and as to whether visibility and performance can be integrated.
Article
Private sector actors are playing an increasingly significant role in the definition and governance of 'sustainable' agri-food practices. Yet, to date little attention has been paid by social scientists to how greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are addressed as part of private agri-food governance arrangements. This paper examines how private actors wi...
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This paper reviews previous social science knowledge about non-English speaking background (NESB) immigrant communities in rural Australia with the aim of systematising what has been a diverse and fragmented literature. We propose a number of unifying themes which suggest the outlines of an emerging social science of ethnic minorities in rural Aust...
Article
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Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) are seen by many as one of the defining projects of a more neoliberalised approach to environmental governance. In practice, however, many PES schemes are hybrid constructions, depending on a mix of market and non-market policy instruments and the involvement of state as well as non-state actors to achieve chan...
Article
[Extract] Scholarly debate about the conditions for, and extent of, 'neoliberal nature' continues to thrive. Rural researchers have contributed to this in many different ways, reflecting "the subjection of more and more areas of ... [rural] environmental life to the logics of capital accumulation" (Castree, 2007, p. 8). Over the last three decades...
Article
We identify the 10 major terrestrial and marine ecosystems in Australia most vulnerable to tipping points, in which modest environmental changes can cause disproportionately large changes in ecosystem properties. To accomplish this we independently surveyed the coauthors of this paper to produce a list of candidate ecosystems, and then refined this...
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The spectre of a food security crisis has raised important questions about future directions for agriculture and given fresh impetus to a long-standing debate about the potential contribution of agricultural biotechnology to food security. This paper considers the discursive foundations for promotion of agricultural biotechnology, arguing that noti...
Article
Adequate conservation of biodiversity on private land remains elusive due, in part, to a failure to understand the personal circumstances and social characteristics of private landholders. Our aim was to identify those personal and social dimensions of landholders that might contribute to improved conservation policy and program design and, thereby...
Article
This paper describes a six-step process to build the leadership capacity of environmental champions. This process was developed during research involving champions in Australian water agencies. The process, like leadership, is sensitive to context. It includes gathering local information on the factors that assist particular types of champion to ex...
Article
Increasing penetration by the market into the governing of agri-environments, and the use of market-oriented approaches in an attempt to produce more sustainable outcomes, is a characteristic feature of what scholars have called the ‘neoliberalisation of nature’. While accepting that neoliberal forms of governing tend to extend market relations int...
Article
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International governmental bodies, such as the World Trade Organisation, are an increasingly prominent feature of global agri-food governance. They are instrumental not only in the dismantling of trade barriers but also in the promotion of a range of rules and standards. These rules are aimed broadly at harmonising national policies and practices s...
Article
Full-text available
We identify the 10 major terrestrial and marine ecosystems in Australia most vulnerable to tipping points, in which modest environmental changes can cause disproportionately large changes in ecosystem properties. To accomplish this we independently surveyed the coauthors of this paper to produce a list of candidate ecosystems, and then refined this...
Article
This paper describes the dynamic nature of leadership processes that are initiated and driven by emergent leaders known as ‘champions’. The research involved a multiple case study method to examine typical champion-driven leadership processes in six urban water management agencies. The analysis indicated that these leadership processes evolved thro...
Article
Many ecosystems exist primarily, or solely, on privately owned (freehold) or managed (leasehold) land. In rural and semirural areas, local and regional government agencies are commonly responsible for encouraging landholders to conserve native vegetation and species on these private properties. Yet these agencies often lack the capacity to design a...
Article
Full-text available
This paper advances the theoretical argument for moving beyond the conventional/alternative divide in the analysis of emerging ‘alternative’ agri-food networks (AAFNs). In order to understand how ‘place’, ‘nature’ and ‘quality’-based food networks emerge and develop, we argue that careful attention needs to be paid to the way in which specific poli...
Article
In Melbourne, Australia, the adoption of Water Sensitive Urban Design (WSUD) and the inclusion of best practice in new urban development has shifted the "drained city" of the 1960s toward an environmentally-oriented "waterways city" for the future. However, the "waterways city" is tenuous owing to the variable commitment of local municipalities to...
Article
Despite questions currently raised about the future of neoliberalism, it remains embedded within Australian agricultural policy and practice. This paper explores the strengths and limitations of mechanisms contributing to neoliberalism’s survival through a close examination of the restructuring of Australian agricultural production and governance p...
Chapter
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Private standards and certification schemes provide an increasingly significant site of study for scholars interested in the restructuring of the agri-food sector. In the last ten years there has been a burgeoning literature on standards and certification schemes, focusing particularly on organic (Guthman, 2004), fair trade (Renard, 2005) and retai...
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This paper reflects on the interplay amongst three closely linked systems – climate, agriculture and biodiversity – in the Australian context. The advance of a European style of agriculture has imperilled Australian biodiversity. The loss and degradation of biodiversity has, in turn, had negative consequences for agriculture. Climate change is impo...
Article
The liberalisation of agricultural trade is strongly contested as an international policy project. In the context of the current World Trade Organisation (WTO) Doha trade round, concerns revolve around the implications of freer trade for rural livelihoods and environments. Analysis of this complex and morally charged issue offers important insights...
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Economic activity in the tropical savannas of northern Australia, like rangeland regions across the globe, has traditionallybeenbasedonprimaryproduction-predominantlycattlegrazingandmining.Morerecently,northernAustralia has experienced an increase in the extent of the conservation estate and in tourism and associated service industries. These trend...
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The concept of ‘multifunctionality’ has developed partly in response to the threat which trade liberalisation presents to European agriculture. In this paper we outline different approaches to multifunctionality and consider whether, and to what extent, the concept may be applied more widely outside its home of origin in Western Europe, and specifi...
Article
This article seeks to extend understanding of how sustainability is operationalized in firms by considering the example of Interface Inc. In particular, we assess the sustainability policy and strategies of Interface Inc. within the frame recourse of an ecological modernization (EM) perspective of sustainability. One question of particular interest...
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Private standards and certification schemes are widely acknowledged as playing an increasingly important role in agri-environmental governance. While much of the existing research concludes that these mechanisms consolidate the global extension of neoliberalism – enhancing the power of corporate actors to the detriment of smaller producers – we arg...
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Purpose This paper seeks to describe a framework used to help MBA students understand and reconcile the different sustainability perspectives. Design/methodology/approach A review of the corporate sustainability literature is undertaken to develop the sustainability framework. Findings The sustainability framework relates basic concepts and assum...
Article
Some global organisations and many national governments have adopted formal descriptions of sustainability, despite its elusive meaning. In most instances, the responsibility for the implementation of sustainability is placed firmly on the land-user. In New Zealand, this is within the context of regional and district plans that are a requirement of...
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The decision in 1988 by the Rangitikei-Wanganui Catchment Board to allocate flows away from use for electricity generation into recreation use brought into focus the conflict between market and non-market valuation of river uses. The travel cost method (TCM) of non-market valuation is used to estimate the in-stream recreation values of the Upper Wa...
Article
Illustrating one facet of farm-level environmental management in post-1984 New Zealand, this paper assesses changes in stewardship among Northland pastoralists. On-farm activities which protect or enhance the environment continue to be undertaken without state support. However, the withdrawal of environmental grants, in tandem with the wider agricu...
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According to one perspective, organizations will only be sustainable if the dominant neoclassical model of the firm is transformed, rather than supplemented, by social and environmental priorities. This article seeks to develop a "sustainability business model" (SBM)-a model where sustainability concepts shape the driving force of the firm and its...
Article
It is increasingly argued that we are entering into a “biotech century”, in which biotechnology promises major advances in agricultural productivity. The development of biotechnology is not a straightforward affair, however, and the advent of GMOs has led to public protest and consumer resistance. This paper draws upon a comparative Australian–UK p...
Article
This paper examines the role of certification in alternative agri-food networks (AAFNs), which are in the process of building markets for their produce outside conventional supply chains. Drawing upon recent writing on ‘embeddedness’, we argue that certification provides an important focus for exploring the relationship and tensions between horizon...
Article
[Extrac] The introduction of genetically modified seeds and crops has given rise to substantial public debate, with proponents and opponents taking increasingly fixed positions over the advantages and disadvantages of GM introduction. Public controversies over the introduction of GMOs in the form of seeds and crops continue to ebb and flow, with an...
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A variety of tools can be employed in support of environmental policy objectives, but achieving preferred outcomes also requires the cooperation of private landholders and others with vested interests in the land. The Land Stewardship project in the state of Victoria, Australia, is an initiative devoted to exploring the ways in which private landho...
Article
Using a case study approach, this article examines how an Australian bank supports and invests in social sustainability using a community development approach. Bendigo Bank's community engagement model (CEM) is consistent with a stakeholder perspective of the firm. The CEM is a hybrid model drawing on commercial principles, such as the for-profit s...
Article
Recent assessments of Australia's land and water resources have revealed widespread patterns of serious decline, much of it directly associated with agricultural practices. The environmental degradation associated with agriculture has both biophysical and socio-economic underpinnings. While there have been calls to attend to the sustainability ‘cri...
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Australian government and non-government agencies have begun to recognise that the action required to address environmental degradation cannot be considered to be the responsibility of landholders alone, and that some form of encouragement to undertake work in the public interest is required. This article outlines social research, undertaken as par...
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The sustainability discourse has been remarkably persistent, indeed growing in its political and social stature over the 20 years or so since it first rose to prominence. In agriculture the already well-established interest in sustainability has been fuelled recently by pressures to extend the use of bio-technology, an increasing consumer interest...
Article
Changes in land use are a common response to deterioration in the economic viability of farming. While diversification into other agricultural land uses apparently takes place with little consternation or resistance, the development of plantation forestry on agricultural land is often accompanied by concern and controversy. What sets plantation for...
Article
For the first time in the history of production forestry in northern New Zealand, forests are being planted on "good farmland." In this article we analyze conflicting narratives of sustainability in relation to this change, using concepts from Žižek (1993, 1997) and Hage (1998). We argue that forestry presents a threat to the identity of pastoral f...
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Full-text available
On 1 July 2000 significant changes to the regulation of Australian dairying came into effect. These changes eliminated subsidies to milk producers and removed barriers to the inter-State trade of dairy products. Victoria's dairy industry group was a powerful proponent of deregulation, because of the comparative advantage that the State's farmers ha...
Book
Economy, society, and environment comprise the three main dimensions of sustainable development but too often they are considered separately. This book, by comparison, examines the interaction of the three dimensions in the context of rural systems, embracing a wide range of topics, including globalisation and reregulation in sustainable food produ...
Chapter
There is broad consensus that sustainable development represents the search for convergence of environmental, social, cultural and political values in development strategies. Furthermore, it is generally agreed that this search involves such considerations as achieving equity within and between generations, and involving people as directly as possi...
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Re-regulation and restructuring have become familiar themes in numerous documentations of recent social, economic and regulatory change. As well as altering established economic, social, and spatial orders, the changes have fractured old certainties and made established theories and familiar analytical terms problematic. Consonant with this new unc...
Article
while the ethical, consumer and environmental issues associated with the development of the biosciences sector are acknowledged, national and sub-national policy is predicated on the assumption that the advantages in terms of economic competitiveness outweigh these concerns. One of the main planks of the Commonwealth's regulatory strategy in respec...
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Our contemporary rural places are influenced by a myriad of processes and face multiple challenges. Amongst these processes, two demographic trends are influential, namely rural depopulation and repopulation. Looking first at depopulation, in the early part of the twentieth century, the populations of Western nations made a transition from being ru...
Article
Recognition that the physical environment cannot sustain the impacts of current patterns of human behaviour has prompted the implementation of a wide range of regulatory mechanisms, broadly falling within two categories, sometimes referred to as "public" and "private". Historically, public regulation has been one of the most popular tools for contr...
Article
It is increasingly recognised that private investors are seeking opportunities for, and reassurance that, their funds are invested in companies that demonstrate superior performance in environmental and social terms. This is commonly referred to as socially responsible investment (SRI). The growth in SRI over the last five years has been impressive...
Article
The cumulative impact of the habitat loss that occurred in the process of 'developing' New Zealand has led to the need to conserve and protect much of the habitat remaining on private land. A range of mechanisms has been produced to reduce habitat losses and to provide some level of protection. Although the benefits of retaining habitats are mostly...
Article
Despite widespread interest in the notion of sustainability, little progress has been made towards an understanding of its social dimensions. Nonetheless, the concept of `sustainable rural communities’ is embedded in popular, policy and academic discourses, where the needs of `rural communities’ are usually equated with those of farm families. Our...
Article
Interest in the role of regulation in support of environmental imperatives and sustainability more generally has corresponded with a broader academic curiosity about evolving regulatory contexts. In this respect, there is a discernible trend towards a re-balancing of the regulatory mix towards an increasing emphasis on private regulation, correspon...
Article
Land degradation is one of the most critical environmental issues facing many countries today. The need to maintain productive agriculture has fuelled interest in finding more appropriate policy and management responses to environmental change, including the various forms of land degradation. While the processes resulting in degraded land are often...
Article
Marine‐protected areas are usually justified and assessed with reference to ecological priorities, but they also have important social and economic implications. Changes in resource use rights that are associated with the establishment of marine reserves often engender strong public opposition. This suggests that effective planning for protected ar...
Article
It has been suggested that regulatory analysis and regulation theory provide appropriate foundations for the analysis of the sustainability problematic. We accept these claims and in this paper provide an interrogation, founded in the literature on ‘real’ regulation, of a judicial decision concerning the allocation of water resources to farm irriga...
Article
. Numerous avifauna species face extinction on New Zealand's two main islands, owing largely to forest clearance and to introduced mammals. In response, New Zealand selects certain offshore islands for the relocation of threatened native birds, first purging them of mammalian predators. Over the past few decades, this procedure has evolved to becom...
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"Intuitively at least, we have a sense that environmental change has the potential to undermine human security. The degradation of resources can negatively affect the capacity of people to sustain their livelihoods. Accessibility to basic necessities such as food can be reduced by environmental change and there are widespread effects upon human hea...
Article
The East Coast Forestry Project (ECFP) is a grant scheme introduced in 1991 to encourage the establishment of commercial forestry on erosion-prone land on the East Coast of the North Island, New Zealand. In that it is government subsidised, the project stands in stark contrast to New Zealand's recent restructuring programme. This in itself has been...
Article
Over the last decade, New Zealand has implemented innovative reforms in respect of natural resource and environmental management. These include the Resource ManagementAct 1991 (RMA), a notable feature of which is the adoption of 'sustainable management' as the key principle guiding resource allocation and use. This and other features of the new adm...
Article
The discourse on sustainability is marked by widely differing interpretations of the concept. It is generally acknowledged, though, that sustainability concerns the interplay amongst social, economic and environmental dimensions. The emphasis on the respective components of this triumvirate differs amongst the various literatures, however, leading...
Article
Wetlands are one of the most severely degraded ecosystems and yet, in most countries, little has been done in the interests of their protection and management. It is estimated that in New Zealand only about 8% of the original wetland areas now remain. As in other places, institutional arrangements for the management of these important habitats have...
Article
During the late 1980s, New Zealand underwent a period of dramatic economic, social, and administrative restructuring. Among the most fundamental reforms was the establishment of sustainable management as the guiding principle for decisions affecting the allocation and use of natural resources and the maintenance of environmental quality. The adopti...
Article
During the 1980s, New Zealand underwent a period of dramatic economic, social, and administrative restructuring. The reform extended to the administrative arrangements for environmental management. A geographic restructuring model is used in this paper to establish the context in which the reforms were carried out. A combination of economic, enviro...
Article
In many of the developed nations of the western world, the existing conservation estates are inadequate in both their extent and their representativeness. For improvement, it will be necessary to bring land in private ownership under formal protection. This then raises questions as to the attitudes and behaviour of private landowners in respect of...
Article
The decision in 1988 by the Rangitikei-Wanganui Catchment Board to allocate flows away from use for electricity generation into recreation use brought into focus the conflict between market and non-market valuation of river uses. The travel cost method (TCM) of non-market valuation is used to estimate the in-stream recreation values of the upper Wa...
Article
In recognition of the need to develop approaches to environmental impact assessment that are both proactive and which take a wider view of environmental change and its causes, there has been increasing interest in the concept of cumulative environmental change and its assessment. We outline a definition and conceptual framework for the analysis of...
Article
Whereas public participation and social impact assessment have become central themes in the resource management literature, direct action strategies by local communities have received much less attention. Direct action is likely to result when communities are affected by changes in their environment, whether these are human induced or the result of...