Chris Anderson

Chris Anderson
Dominican University · Biology

PhD

About

22
Publications
3,299
Reads
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748
Citations
Additional affiliations
August 2014 - present
Dominican University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
August 2012 - July 2014
Oberlin College
Position
  • Visiting Assistant Professor
January 2010 - August 2012
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
Position
  • Postodoctoral Researcher
Education
September 2002 - June 2009
August 1998 - May 2002
Denison University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Interspecific territoriality has complex ecological and evolutionary consequences. Species that interact aggressively often exhibit spatial or temporal shifts in activity that reduce the frequency of costly encounters. We analyzed data collected over a 13-year period on 50 populations of rubyspot damselflies (Hetaerina spp.) to examine how rates of...
Article
Full-text available
Many interspecifically territorial species interfere with each other reproductively, and in some cases, aggression towards heterospecifics may be an adaptive response to interspecific mate competition. This hypothesis was recently formalised in an agonistic character displacement (ACD) model which predicts that species should evolve to defend terri...
Article
Reproductive interference is widespread, despite the theoretical expectation that it should be eliminated by reproductive character displacement (RCD). A possible explanation is that females of sympatric species are too similar phenotypically for males to distinguish between them, resulting in a type of evolutionary dilemma or catch-22 in which rep...
Article
Understanding how phenotypic plasticityevolves and in turn affects thecourse of evolution is a major challenge in modern biology.By definition, biological species are reproductively isolated, but many animals fail to distinguish between conspecifics and closely related heterospecifics. In some cases, phenotypic plasticity may interfere with species...
Article
Interspecific territoriality occurs when individuals of different species fight over space, and may arise spontaneously when populations of closely related territorial species first come into contact. But defence of space is costly, and unless the benefits of excluding heterospecifics exceed the costs, natural selection should favour divergence in...
Article
The decision rules that animals use for distinguishing between conspecifics of different age and sex classes are relevant for understanding how closely related species interact in sympatry. In rubyspot damselflies (Hetaerina spp.), the red wing coloration of mature males is hypothesized to be a key trait for sex recognition and competitor recogniti...
Article
Copulation duration is often highly variable within and among species. Here, we explore the roles of body size, male morph, morph frequency, and alternative reproductive tactics to explain copulation duration in the damselfly Paraphlebia zoe. P. zoe has two male morphs (pigmented or hya- line wings) which differ in reproductive tactics (territorial...
Article
Full-text available
Competition has always been a cornerstone of evolutionary biology, and aggression is the predominant form of direct competition in animals, but the evolutionary effects of aggression between species are curiously understudied. Only in the past few years, existing theoretical frameworks have been extended to include interspecific aggression, and sig...
Article
Full-text available
The waterfall damselfly, Paraphelbia zoe, is distributed in cloud forest areas in the Mexican states of Veracruz, Hidalgo, and San Luis Potosi. We developed twelve microsatellite loci for P. zoe from representative samples from the state of Veracruz. Microsatellites were tested for polymorphism on a panel of 24 individuals. The number of alleles ra...
Article
Hetaerina damselflies are distributed throughout the neotropics. We developed eleven microsatellite loci for the damselfly Hetaerina americana. Microsatellites were tested for polymorphism on a panel of 24 individuals. The number of alleles ranged from 2 to 6, observed heterozygosity from 0.080 to 0.701, and the fixation index from −0.266 to 1.000....
Article
Full-text available
Interspecific territoriality may be adaptive if territories contain depletable resources that are valuable to both species, but it can also arise as a maladaptive by-product of intraspecific territoriality. In the latter scenario, sympatric species ought to diverge in ways that reduce interspecific fighting. We studied 4 Hetaerina damselfly species...
Article
Full-text available
Aggression between species is a seldom-considered but potentially widespread mechanism of character displacement in secondary sexual characters. Based on previous research showing that similarity in wing coloration directly influences interspecific territorial aggression in Hetaerina damselflies, we predicted that wing coloration would show a patte...
Article
Full-text available
In zones of sympatry between closely related species, species recognition errors in a competitive context can cause character displacement in agonistic signals and competitor recognition functions, just as species recognition errors in a mating context can cause character displacement in mating signals and mate recognition. These two processes are...
Article
The extent to which interspecific interference competition has contributed to character evolution is one of the most neglected problems in evolutionary biology. When formerly allopatric species come into secondary contact, aggressive interactions between the species can cause selection on traits that affect interspecific encounter rates (e.g. habit...
Article
The extent to which interspecific interference competition has contributed to character evolution is one of the most neglected problems in evolutionary biology. When formerly allopatric species come into secondary contact, aggressive interactions between the species can cause selection on traits that affect interspecific encounter rates (e.g. habit...
Article
The colours of male coenagrionid damselflies have been interpreted by some as intraspecific signals that reduce intrasexual harassment by advertising the unprofitability of pursuing conspecific males as potential mates. As visual cues, male colours should be conspicuous to other males under the specific light environments where males search for fem...
Article
Hetaerina titia males bear wing pigmentation patterns similar to Hetaerina and Calopteryx (a derived sister genus of Hetaerina) species: black (typical of Calopteryx) and red (typical of Hetaerina). Sexual selection has operated on red (via male-male competition) and black (via male-male competition and female choice) in Hetaerina and Calopteryx, r...

Projects

Project (1)
Project
We are mapping the distribution, areas and potential threats of Mexican odonates. The idea is to obtain more accurate information of the conservation status of these animals. Also, we are producing books and handbook material for kids so that these can get to know these fantastic animals.