Chin-Ee Ong

Chin-Ee Ong
Sun Yat-Sen University | SYSU · School of Tourism and Management (STM)

PhD, Tourism Management

About

51
Publications
15,321
Reads
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569
Citations
Introduction
I am a tourism and cultural geographer with keen interests in outbound Chinese tourism, theme park development in Asia, dark tourism and carceral geographies of refugee camps in Europe and Asia. ​I have published 16 internationally peer-reviewed journal articles, co-edited a book and 11 book chapters on these focal areas. ​I am the co-founder of the Heritage Tourism and Education Special Interest Group in the Association of Leisure and Tourism Education and am on the advisory board for social science based journal, Hospitality and Society and the Editorial Review Board of International Journal of Tourism Cities.
Additional affiliations
January 2012 - July 2015
Wageningen University & Research
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines through an analysis of Dutch warfare tourism whether there is a relationship between the subjective perceived salience of Dutch identity and heritage tourists' motives, emotions and overall satisfaction. Using a social identity theory framework, this study provides a view of motives for Dutch warfare heritage tourism and the way...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper, Chimelong Ocean Kingdom in Zhuhai is considered an aestheticised space for the growing Chinese middle class. Located within the booming and fast-urbanising Pearl River Delta, the theme park is a sizeable project consisting of rides, marine mammal enclosures and a well-equipped state-of-the-art circus. Utilising ethnography, including...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the genealogy of Vietnamese refugees based at a transit camp in Singapore between 1975 and 1996. Created by UNHCR with permission of the Singapore government, Hawkins Road Camp hosted Vietnamese refugees with confirmed destinations in their transit. The transit camp was found to be heterotopian, oscillating between the state’s e...
Article
Full-text available
This paper offers insights into backpacker tourism from the People’s Republic of China. Chinese backpackers are a distinctively post-Mao reform generation growing up at a time when China shifts from Mao Zedong’s socialist policies to Deng Xiaoping’s policy explorations with capitalism. Through distanced virtual ethnography of a leading internet for...
Article
Full-text available
This paper offers insights into the power-knowledge situations within tour guide training in Macao and queries the associated embedded capitalistic domination and utopian pressures. Drawing upon a tour guide trainer’s autoethnography, ethnography within the classroom, life and work history interviews with tour guides, and critical discourse analysi...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In February 2020, the 2nd Critical Tourism Studies-Asia Pacific conference was convened at Wakayama University, Japan, with the theme Tourism in Troubled Times-a prescient call for what was about to rapidly unfold. Since then, the tourism industry weathered the hardest cutbacks since modern tourism emerged, as the COVID-19 pandemic raged across the...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines an intense form of tourism urbanisation that is produced by the dual operations of strong Chinese-style socialist instructions and ambitious capitalistic experimentations. Drawing on a decade-long recurring ethnography at Hengqin, this study traces state-directed discourses and how these have been discursively, practically perfo...
Article
As mountain tourism rapidly expands in remote landscapes, there is a critical need for improved disaster risk management to ensure the safety of tourists and industry workers, safeguard infrastructure designed to support tourism and service industries (e.g., transportation), as well as protect the local economies that have come to depend on tourism...
Article
Purpose This paper responds to the lack of visitor engagement in many culture-based World Heritage sites and conceptualises a “Cuteification-Value Nexus” for the discussion of the communication of heritage values through “cute” or aesthetically pleasing popular culture elements. It reflects on observations in Macao to argue for a greater engagement...
Article
Full-text available
This editorial is the first of a two-part critical reflection upon the progress of Hospitality & Society in its first ten years in relation to the original aims and ambitions. Drawing primarily upon the Dimensions database, a field of research analysis indicates the journal achieving multidisciplinary coverage through its publications with the four...
Article
Full-text available
This article is the second part of a critical reflection upon the progress of Hospitality & Society in its first ten years. Analysis of the articles published highlights conceptual contributions made to the field of hospitality studies. Thirteen major themes are identified: conceptualizations of hospitality; migration and labour; lifestyle; social...
Article
This paper examines the genealogy of Vietnamese refugees based at a transit camp in Singapore between 1975 and 1996. Created by UNHCR with permission of the Singapore government, Hawkins Road Camp hosted Vietnamese refugees with confirmed destinations in their transit. The transit camp was found to be heterotopian, oscillating between the state’s e...
Poster
This was an IGU India conference virtual session. There is a you tube video of the session at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OGanKcYgGXQ
Poster
Full-text available
That “tourism is a geographical phenomenon linking places through mobility (Müller, 2019, p. 1) is an axiom that holds. In establishing the journal Tourism Geographies in 1999, Lew (1999, p. 1) outlined that “for most geographers, it was a fascination with places on a map - a desire to learn more about how they came to be - that first drew them to...
Article
Full-text available
Accounts on how creative strategies and paradigms have been copied and circulated from one city to another are not new in tourism studies. However, they are traditionally characterized by arguments of serial reproduction that tends to conceptualize the process of policy circulation like a linear adoption of exogenous prescriptions copied by another...
Article
Full-text available
Through an examination of two festivals – Qing Ming and Cap Go Meh – in the town of Singkawang in Indonesian Borneo (Kalimantan), we show how Singkawang-bound Chinese Indonesian tourists and their Singkawang-based relatives produce a diasporic heritage network through ‘moorings’ generated by both transnational and internal migration. Instead of ret...
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines an unusual type of ‘cultural theme park’, one that is not based on simulating existing cultural diversity or historical places, but based in some senses on a ‘double simulation’. The theme park is based on an historical painting assumed to represent the North Song Dynasty period in Kaifeng, China; however, it is a representation...
Article
Full-text available
This paper introduces a special issue on Theme Parks in Asia with reflections on how the various theoretical ideas on theming and theme parks that are found in the social science literature can help us to understand the proliferation of theming and theme parks in contemporary Asia. How does theming create a specific spatial and social form that has...
Article
This paper examines the relationship between space and violence through a biopolitical enquiry of custody and care at Amsterdam's Lloyd Hotel. The Lloyd Hotel began as a corporate established transhipment hotel serving transatlantic voyages. It was subsequently transformed into an emergency refugee camp and an improvised prison and juvenile detenti...
Article
Full-text available
Purpose – Drawing upon an analysis of resident and visitor survey data and Macau Government Tourist Office (MGTO) press releases in 2012, the purpose of this paper is to understand the tourism destination image for this tourist historic city produced by these three key stakeholder groups in Macau. Design/methodology/approach – This is achieved usi...
Chapter
Full-text available
Article
Full-text available
This paper examines the relationship between space and violence through a biopolitical enquiry of custody and care at Amsterdam's Lloyd Hotel. The Lloyd Hotel began as a corporate established tran-shipment hotel serving transatlantic voyages. It was subsequently transformed into an emergency refugee camp and an improvised prison and juvenile detent...
Article
This paper examines the relationship between space and violence through a biopolitical enquiry of custody and care at Amsterdam's Lloyd Hotel. The Lloyd Hotel began as a corporate established transhipment hotel serving transatlantic voyages. It was subsequently transformed into an emergency refugee camp and an improvised prison and juvenile detenti...
Article
Full-text available
Existing research on historic hotels has identified their role as key projections of community ideals and place identities, as ‘hip’/creative business ventures and as dark tourism sites of ‘darkness', difficulties and dissonances. However, there has been less discussion on what happens when these intentions and operations come together in a single...
Article
Full-text available
Through analysing the correspondence between key refugee camp commanders based at Amsterdam's Lloyd Hotel and different authorities involved in Dutch refugee matters, this paper examines how "the Dutch state" responded to German-Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi Germany in the prelude to World War II. Using a largely Foucauldian approach to discipline,...
Article
Full-text available
Through analysing the correspondence between key refugee camp commanders based at Amsterdam's Lloyd Hotel and different authorities involved in Dutch refugee matters, this paper examines how "the Dutch state" responded to German-Jewish refugees fleeing Nazi Germany in the prelude to World War II. Using a largely Foucauldian approach to discipline,...
Article
Full-text available
Existing research on historic hotels has identified their role as key projections of community ideals and place identities, as ‘hip’/creative business ventures and as dark tourism sites of ‘darkness', difficulties and dissonances. However, there has been less discussion on what happens when these intentions and operations come together in a single...
Article
This paper examines the disciplined mobility and emotional geographies of between-deck passengers in Royal Dutch Lloyd's early Twentieth Century passenger shipping network. Specifically, it is concerned with the ways in which the network was established and with the efforts made to maintain it. It is found that such a disciplinary network furthers...
Article
Sixty years ago, copies of the first volume of The Malayan Journal of Tropical Geography were on their way from Singapore to subscribers in Australia, Burma, Canada, France, Gold Coast (today Ghana), India, New Zealand, Sarawak (today part of Malaysia), South Africa, Taiwan, the United Kingdom and the United States, as well as in other parts of Bri...
Article
Full-text available
Recent years have seen increased academic attention in urban studies on the flows of city artefacts and images. Conceptualised as ‘immutable mobiles’, the Macao Pavilion and its associated objects on show at Shanghai Expo 2010 are examined for the ways they encouraged and regulated uniformed flows of people and city images. Specifically, these immu...
Article
Full-text available
With more than US$15 billion invested in Macao's gaming industry between 2005 and 2010 for the creation of world-class casinos, theatres, theme parks and luxury shopping malls, intense casino development transformed Macao's urban landscape. Much is said about Macao's astonishing rate of tourist arrivals and staggering gross domestic product in the...
Article
Full-text available
Recent years have seen increased academic attention in urban studies on the flows of city artefacts and images. Conceptualised as 'immutable mobiles', the Macao Pavilion and its associated objects on show at Shanghai Expo 2010 are examined for the ways they encouraged and regulated uniformed flows of people and city images. Specifically, these immu...
Article
Full-text available
With more than US$15 billion invested in Macao's gaming industry between 2005 and 2010 for the creation of world-class casinos, theatres, theme parks and luxury shopping malls, intense casino development transformed Macao's urban landscape. Much is said about Macao's astonishing rate of tourist arrivals and staggering gross domestic product in the...
Article
Full-text available
Based on the book by Alex Garland, Twentieth Century Fox's movie, The Beach, proffers critical views on the effects of traveller tourism in Thailand. Yet the movie is itself bound up with tourist practices in a variety of ways. In this article, we are concerned with how such intertwining extends beyond `film tourism', conventionally conceived. In p...

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Projects

Projects (5)
Project
Tourism Metamorphosis: ​Creative Destruction and the Remaking of Tourism Geographies​ In February 2020, the 2nd Critical Tourism Studies - Asia Pacific conference was convened at Wakayama University, Japan, with the theme Tourism in Troubled Times - a prescient call for what was about to rapidly unfold. Since then, the tourism industry weathered the hardest cutbacks since modern tourism emerged, as the COVID-19 pandemic raged across the globe. Yet in the midst of this hard hitting pandemic, the catchphrase, ‘build back better’ reverberated across tourism circles, even as we are still re-imagining what we mean by “better”. The third biennial Critical Tourism Studies – Asia Pacific conference addresses this widespread sentiment by focusing on tourism metamorphosis throughout the Asia-Pacific region. We invite papers that address the emergence from the pandemic-induced chrysalis that pave the way for a future that accounts for the deepest concerns of communities, businesses, and governments. Recovery from almost three years of exceptional challenges in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic requires a radical remaking of tourism geographies. The invocation of metamorphosis accounts for the process of renewal through the creative destruction of old modes of travel. Bursting with possibility, new, more conscious travel experiences have the potential to prioritize the wellbeing of the planet and its people over the pure pursuit of profits. Yet, while cautiously optimistic, scholars such as Jason W. Moore demonstrate how these kinds of radical shifts require new concepts, stories and philosophies to make sense of the global present. He warns, the kind of thinking that created today’s global turbulence is unlikely to help us solve our current troubles (Moore, 2016, p. 1) - we critically need new ways of thinking, new ways of doing, and new ways of talking about tourism, to address the issues of these troubled times – conversations that CTS-AP has embarked on since 2020. Despite the amplification of concerns over climate change, inequality, and gender equity, the global community maintains an inertia pitting action as something that must wait. Prevarications stave off radical change to avoid the present day costs of doing so despite the looming anxieties about the breakdown of planetary systems. ‘Rebuilding what once was’ is perhaps an efficient route for tourism businesses that were battered for a prolonged period in a pandemic. Hence, this conference calls for a metamorphosis in tourism signaling an allegoric anecdote for humankind, where the emergent catastrophe is anthropogenic. Tourism metamorphosis speaks of inertia and a befuddlement of how to deal with the challenges of a status quo that remains stubborn, and in the end, leaves a trail of destruction in its wake. Although, through calamity, tourism metamorphosis signals the materialization of optimism, as the lessons learned make way for a radically transformed setting. Apropos, tourism metamorphosis is in the offing, where troubled times, paves the way for an urgent reckoning toward a remaking of tourism geographies that accounts for the consequences of untrammeled growth, climate change and planetary limitations. Metamorphosis as a heuristic device is central to the framing of the 3rd Critical Tourism Studies Asia Pacific conference that seeks to advance from ‘end times’ narratives, toward what Joseph Schumpeter refers to as creative destruction – the stage at which radical and generative rethinking follows a period of disruption and chaos. Pursuing unrestrained growth and living within planetary means has never been so urgent. Amidst the debris from and the aftereffects of the coronavirus pandemic, war, and climate change effects, we engage with Ulrich Beck’s invocation of metamorphosis which implies a radical transformation through which the certainties of modern society are being replaced by new ways of thinking and acting. Thus, Beck argues, “To grasp the metamorphosis of the world it is necessary to explore the new beginnings, to focus on what is emerging from the old and seek to grasp future structures and norms in the turmoil of the present” (Beck, 2016, p. 3). Others, such as Bruno Latour reiterate the clamor for a metamorphosis, insisting that a cosmological crisis has erupted in ways that reorient human life and reorder planetary primacies (Latour, 2021, p. 119).” Dialogues, Approaches and Pathways Set in the Asia Pacific, the Tourism Metamorphosis theme of the 3rd Critical Tourism Studies Asia Pacific conference engages with the broad notions of metamorphosis – as a heuristic and conceptual touchstone. Empirical and theoretical insights that engage with the metamorphosis of tourism geographies will contribute to new ways of thinking, feeling and doing tourism research and practice. Dialogues at the 3rd Critical Tourism Studies Asia Pacific conference will be bold, pushing the boundaries of tourism research into novel and challenging frontiers of scholarship. Contributions will transition from narratives of ‘troubled times’ and simplistic entreaties such as ‘building back better’, towards substantive queries into how creative destruction is afoot. Potential key themes (among others and in no particular order) may include: Degrowth, Inclusive Growth - provocations and implications Sustainability - tensions and redundancies Postgrowth - contentions and realities Topophilia – transformations and stickiness Global capitalism – uneven development and disproportionate power Biopolitics – power and the powerless Anthropocene/Capitalocene – nature and capital Geopolitics – cooperation and competition Economics – yield and imposition Regeneration – substance and hype Everyday – mundanity and exception Advocacy – grassroots and academic Gender, Race, Ethnicity– binaries and pluralities Culture – traditional and contemporary Heritage – valued and commodified Nature – endangered and exploited Non-human – veneration and disregard Spirituality – devotion and spectacle Climate – action and inertia Justice, Equity – responsibility and negligence Heritage – protection and development Planning – deliberate and disordered Environment – pristine and desecrated Space – shared or restricted Theory – contributions and criticisms Method – innovations and endeavours Livelihoods – constrained and augmented Rural – revitalization and decline Urban – liveability and congestion Governance – efficacy and impracticality Neoliberalism – regulation and deregulation Social movements – uprising and suppressing Pilgrimage – journeys and endings Individual and Session Abstract Submission Guidelines Paper Abstracts Deadline: September 30, 2022 Submit Paper Abstracts HERE* Abstracts should include: Abstract title (descriptive and unambiguous) Author names, affiliations, and email addresses Research context and background Research question/problem statement Methods employed and rationale Findings and results Discussion and contribution to critical tourism studies Keywords (up to 5) Abstract to be labeled – author surname_CTSAP3 Abstract 400-word maximum word limit *Papers that are part of sessions should be submitted using the paper abstract submission form. Please indicate on the form the name of the session that your paper belongs. Paper Session Abstracts- Deadline: September 30th Submit Session Abstracts HERE: https://www.criticaltourismstudies.com/ Sessions are called for where organisers will coalesce papers under a coherent and unified theme. These can be (1) closed (organisers secure appropriate papers for their session) or (2) open sessions (organisers make a public call). Sessions will be comprised of up to 4 papers. Organisers should prepare a 400-word session description with instructions clearly outlined and should include: Session title (descriptive and unambiguous) Organiser/s names, affiliations and email addresses Concept/theme with clear description of background, aims and key guiding literature Session proposal to be labelled – Proposer names_CTSAP3 Session proposal Structure required of abstracts (see below)​ Author Guidelines ​The 3rd Critical Tourism Studies Asia Pacific abides by APA7 12 Font, Times New Roman Single spaced References Beck, U. (2016). The metamorphosis of the world: How climate change is transforming our concept of the world. Polity. Kafka, F, (1915). The Metamorphosis. Kurt Wolf Verlag. Latour, B. (2021). After lockdown: A metamorphosis. Polity. Moore, J. W. (Ed.). (2016). Anthropocene or capitalocene? Nature, history, and the crisis of capitalism. PM Press. Schumpeter, J. A. (1942). Capitalism, Socialism and Democracy. Harvard University Press. Sin, H. L., Mostafanezhad, M., & Cheer, J. M. (Eds.). (2022). Recentering Tourism Geographies in the ‘Asian Century’. Routledge.
Project
In this project, we examine the places and processes of leisure from a heritage vantage point and argue for the preservation of such memories and landscapes.
Project
This project investigates China's role in the tourism development in the maritime silk road zone.