Chiara De Gregorio

Chiara De Gregorio
Università degli Studi di Torino | UNITO · Dipartimento di Scienze della Vita e Biologia dei Sistemi

PhD

About

22
Publications
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Citations
Introduction
I'm interested in primate communication, in particular in singing primates. The goal of my research is to understand which are the social and environmental factors that shape singing behavior.

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
The increasing interest in the evolution of human language has led several fields of research to focus on primate vocal communication. The ‘singing primates’, which produce elaborated and complex sequences of vocalizations, are of particular interest for this topic. Indris (Indri indri) are the only singing lemurs and emit songs whose most distinct...
Article
Full-text available
Among the behavioral traits shared by some nonhuman primate species and humans there is singing. Unfortunately, our understanding of animals' rhythmic abilities is still in its infancy. Indris are the only lemurs who sing and live in monogamous pairs, usually forming a group with their offspring. All adult members of a group usually participate in...
Article
Full-text available
In animal vocal communication, the development of adult-like vocalization is fundamental to interact appropriately with conspecifics. However, the factors that guide ontogenetic changes in the acoustic features remains poorly understood. In contrast with a historical view of nonhuman primate vocal production as substantially innate, recent research...
Article
What are the origins of musical rhythm? One approach to the biology and evolution of music consists in finding common musical traits across species. These similarities allow biomusicologists to infer when and how musical traits appeared in our species¹. A parallel approach to the biology and evolution of music focuses on finding statistical univers...
Preprint
Full-text available
The complexity of primates’ singing behavior has long gathered the attention of researchers interested in understanding the selective pressures underpinning the evolution of language. Among these pressures, a link between territoriality, pair-living, and singing displays has been suggested. Historically, singing primates have been found in a few ta...
Article
Full-text available
The critically endangered indri (Indri indri) is the largest extant lemur species and its population size is projected to decline over the next three generations due to habitat loss, hunting and climate change. Accurate information on the demographic parameters driving the population dynamics of indri is urgently needed to help decision-making rega...
Article
Full-text available
Vocal and gestural sequences of several primates have been found to conform to two general principles of information compression: the compensation between the duration of a construct and that of its components (Menzerath–Altmann law) and an inverse relationship between signal duration and its occurrence (Zipf’s law of abbreviation). Even though Zip...
Article
Full-text available
Territorial pair-living species tend to occupy and defend stable areas, assumed to contain all the resources needed for the lifetime of the group. Furthermore, groups have to mediate spatial relationships with neighboring groups. We investigated the relationship between social and spatial dynamics at the intra- and intergroup level in a pair-living...
Article
Animal acoustic communication often takes the form of complex sequences, composed of multiple distinct acoustic units, which can vary in their degree of stereotypy. Studies of sequence variation may contribute to our understanding of the structural flexibility of primates' songs, which can provide essential ecological and behavioral information abo...
Preprint
Full-text available
We used a logic distance to investigate intra and inter-individual variation in the phrase combinatorics of a singing primate, the indri, which inhabits the montane rain forests of Madagascar. Indris combine long notes, short single notes, and phrases consisting of two, three, four, or five units with slightly descending frequency. We calculated th...
Preprint
We used a logic distance to investigate intra and inter-individual variation in the phrase combinatorics of a singing primate, the indri, which inhabits the montane rain forests of Madagascar. Indris combine long notes, short single notes, and phrases consisting of two, three, four, or five units with slightly descending frequency. We calculated th...
Conference Paper
In the dense tropical rainforests of Madagascar, visual communication is impeded by obstacles. Lemurs use scent marking to communicate at a short distance and loud calls to communicate at a long range. The Indri (Indri indri) is a diurnal primate that emits choruses of three distinct types. The song types are essential in advertising position withi...
Article
Monogamy is a rare strategy among mammals but relatively common among primates. The study of the evolution of monogamy in mammals and primates is lacking empirical studies that assess the relationship between a pair‐living social organization and genetic monogamy. Sexual or genetic monogamy can only be assessed by performing molecular analyses and...
Article
Full-text available
Although there is a growing number of researches focusing on acoustic communication, the lack of shared analytic approaches leads to inconsistency among studies. Here, we introduced a computational method used to examine 3360 calls recorded from wild indris (Indri indri) from 2005–2018. We split each sound into ten portions of equal length and, fro...
Article
In the dense tropical rainforests of Madagascar, visual communication is impeded by obstacles. Lemurs use scent marking to communicate at a short distance and loud calls to communicate at a long range. The Indri (Indri indri) is a diurnal primate that emits choruses of three distinct types. The song types are essential in advertising position withi...
Article
Full-text available
Estimating the number of animals participating in a choral display may contribute reliable information on animal population estimates, particularly when environmental or behavioral factors restrict the possibility of visual surveys. Difficulties in providing a reliable estimate of the number of singers in a chorus are many (e.g., background noise m...
Data
Summary of the dataset. Summary of the dataset with group ID, site, year of the recording, individual, sex, number of singers (mean+sd), group size (mean+sd) and number of days in which the songs were recorded. * symbol denotes that the individual is an adult (aged more than 6 years) at the time of the recording (column Year); R symbol indicates th...
Data
Indri chorus. An extract from a reproductive pair’s duet. (MP4)
Data
Results of the Tukey’s HSD (honestly significant difference) applied to the group size during our study. The groups are listed in order of ascending harmonic means (mean±se). Subset 1: p = 0.122; Subset 2: p = 0.060. (DOCX)
Article
Among the behavioral traits shared by some nonhuman primate species and humans there is singing. Unfortunately, our understanding of animals' rhythmic abilities is still in its infancy. Indris are the only lemurs who sing and live in monogamous pairs, usually forming a group with their offspring. All adult members of a group usually participate in...

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