Chiara Anzolini

Chiara Anzolini
Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati di Trieste | SISSA · Interdisciplinary Laboratory for Advanced Studies (ILAS)

PhD
Science communicator 👩🏻‍💻 with a PhD in Earth Sciences 💎

About

30
Publications
7,328
Reads
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182
Citations
Introduction
I am a geoscientist currently enrolled in the postgraduate Master's Course in Science Communication at SISSA in Trieste (Italy). After completing a PhD in Earth Sciences at the University of Padova (Italy) in 2018, I obtained a position as a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of Alberta (Canada). My aim is to combine the experience I gained as a researcher with these newly-acquired skills in science communication to bridge science and society.
Additional affiliations
October 2020 - February 2022
Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati di Trieste
Position
  • Master's Student
Description
  • I am currently enrolled in the postgraduate Master's Course in Science Communication “Franco Prattico”, one of the oldest and most well established science communication masters in Europe. MCS focuses on interdisciplinary and international education in areas such as journalism, publishing, multimedia, social networks, corporate communication and museum studies.
May 2018 - April 2020
University of Alberta
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • D. Graham Pearson
March 2017 - June 2017
University of Padova
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • Mineralogy, 36 hours, Bachelor Degree in Geological Sciences
Education
October 2020 - February 2022
November 2014 - February 2018
University of Padova
Field of study
  • Earth Sciences
October 2012 - September 2014
University of Padova
Field of study
  • Geology and Technical Geology

Publications

Publications (30)
Article
Full-text available
Heamanite-(Ce) (IMA 2020-001), ideally (K0.5Ce0.5)TiO3, is a new perovskite-group mineral found as an inclusion in a diamond from the Gahcho Kué mine in the Northwest Territories, Canada. It occurs as brown, translucent single crystals with average maximum dimension of ~80 μm, associated with rutile and calcite. The luster is adamantine and the fra...
Article
Full-text available
The recent discovery in high-pressure experiments of compounds stable to 24-26 GPa with Fe 4 O 5 , Fe 5 O 6 , Fe 7 O 9 , and Fe 9 O 11 stoichi-ometry has raised questions about their existence within the Earth's mantle. Incorporating both ferric and ferrous iron in their structures, these oxides if present within the Earth could also provide insigh...
Article
Full-text available
Nixonite (IMA 2018-133), ideally Na2Ti6O13, is a new mineral found within a heavily-metasomatized pyroxenite xenolith from the Darby kimberlite field, beneath the west central Rae Craton, Canada. It occurs as microcrystalline aggregates, 15 to 40 μm in length. Nixonite is isostructural with jeppeite, K2Ti6O13, with a structure consisting of edge- a...
Article
Super-deep diamonds (SDDs) are those that form at depths between ~300 and ~1000 km in Earth’s mantle. They compose only 1% of the entire diamond population but play a pivotal role in geology, as they represent the deepest direct samples from the interior of our planet. Ferropericlase, (Mg,Fe)O, is the most abundant mineral found as inclusions in SD...
Article
Full-text available
Diamonds, and the mineral inclusions they trap during growth, are pristine samples from the mantle that reveal processes in the deep Earth, provided the depth of formation of an inclusion-diamond pair being known. The majority of diamonds are lithospheric, while the depth of origin of super-deep diamonds (SDDs), which represent only 6% of the total...
Thesis
Full-text available
Leading academic institutions, governments, and funders of research across the world have spent the last few decades fretting publicly about the need for scientists and research organisations to engage more widely with the public and be open about their research. Within a frame of growing universities competition and marketisation, global literatur...
Conference Paper
Diamonds containing fluid and mineral inclusions that were trapped during formation are the only natural samples capable of probing the deepest portions of the Earth’s mantle (down to ~800 km depth). In order to precisely interpret the mineralogical and geochemical information they provide, the growth relationships between diamonds and inclusions (...
Article
Full-text available
IMA No. 2020-001 Heamanite-(Ce) (K0.5Ce0.5)TiO3 As inclusions in a diamond from the Gahcho Kué mine (5034 pipe), Northwest Territories, Canada (63°26′04′′N, 109°11′10′′W) Chiara Anzolini*, William Siva-Jothy, Andrew J. Locock, Fabrizio Nestola, Tonci Balić-Žunić, Matteo Alvaro, Thomas Stachel and D. Graham Pearson E-mail: anzolini@ualberta.ca Perov...
Book
Full-text available
Marco e Alice, due fratelli di 11 e 8 anni, vanno a scuola e fanno sport, insomma hanno una vita molto impegnata. Approfittano del loro tempo libero per andare alla scoperta delle meraviglie geologiche attorno a casa e lo fanno in compagnia di tre simpatici animaletti estinti (o quasi) e di un geologo puntiglioso: insieme hanno scalato montagne, co...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Inclusions in diamonds can tell us much of the deep and inaccessible portions of our planet including its mineralogy and the deeper effects of plate tectonics. Recently, great attention has been given in particular to those inclusions which classify their diamond hosts as “super-deep” or “sublithospheric” diamonds, which comprise only ~ 1% of the e...
Article
Full-text available
IMA No. 2018-133 Nixonite Na2Ti6O13 Darby kimberlite field, beneath the west central Rae Craton, ca. 200 km SW of the community of Kugaaruk, Nunavut, Canada (67°23’56.6”N, 93°21’13.9”W) Chiara Anzolini*, Fei Wang, Garrett A. Harris, Andrew J. Locock, Dongzhou Zhang, Steven D. Jacobsen and D. Graham Pearson *E-mail: anzolini@ualberta.ca The Na analo...
Thesis
Full-text available
Diamonds, and the mineral inclusions they trap during growth, are pristine samples from the mantle that reveal processes in the deep Earth, provided the depth of formation of an inclusion-diamond pair being known. The majority of diamonds are lithospheric, while the depth of origin of super-deep diamonds (SDDs), which represent only 6% of the total...
Article
Full-text available
“Super-deep” diamonds are thought to have a sub-lithospheric origin (i.e. below ~300 km depth) because some of the mineral phases entrapped within them as inclusions are considered to be the products of retrograde transformation from lower-mantle or transition-zone precursors. CaSiO3-walstromite, the most abundant Ca-bearing mineral inclusion found...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Super-deep diamonds are believed to have formed at depths of at least 300 km depth (Harte, 2010). A common mineral inclusion in these diamonds is ferropericlase, (Mg,Fe)O (see Kaminsky, 2012 and references therein). Ferropericlase (fPer) is the second most abundant mineral in the lower mantle, comprising approximately 16–20 wt% (660 to 2900 km dept...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
“Super-deep” diamonds are thought to have a sub-lithospheric origin based on their mineral inclusions. CaSiO3-walstromite is believed to derive from CaSiO3-perovskite, although its depth of origin is unknown. The remnant pressure (Pinc) retained by an inclusion allows calculation of the entrapment pressure of the diamond-inclusion pair. Our aim was...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Natural diamonds containing silicate, oxide and sulfide inclusions are a popular focus of investigation as they uniquely provide a window into the conditions of the Earth's interior at extreme depths. Recent discoveries based on investigations of deep diamonds have considerably improved our knowledge of the Earth's deep carbon and water cycles and...
Article
Full-text available
Jeffbenite, ideally Mg 3 Al 2 Si 3 O 8 , previously known as tetragonal-almandine-pyrope-phase ('TAPP’), has been characterized as a new mineral from an inclusion in an alluvial diamond from São Luiz river, Juina district of Mato Grosso, Brazil. Its density is 3.576 g/cm ³ and its microhardness is ∼7. Jeffbenite is uniaxial (-) with refractive inde...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Jeffbenite is a new tetragonal phase with garnet-like stoichiometry (Nestola et al., 2016) previously referred to as TAPP (Tetragonal Almandine-Pyrope Phase), which is found exclusively in nature as inclusions in super-deep diamonds and may provide key information about their depth of formation. Nevertheless, whether jeffbenite forms as a primary p...
Article
“Super-deep” diamonds are thought to crystallize between 300 and 800 km depth because some of the inclusions trapped within them are considered to be the products of retrograde transformation from lower mantle or transition zone precursors. In particular, single inclusion CaSiO3-walstromite is believed to derive from CaSiO3-perovskite, although its...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Diamond is the paramount phase to understand the evolution and the physico-chemical condition of the deep portions of the Earth’s mantle, mainly because: (i) it is the stable phase through which carbon is stored in the deep mantle for long geologic time; (ii) it does contain and preserve different types of inclusions (fluid, mineral, etc.); (iii) i...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Super-deep diamonds are thought to crystallize between about 300 and 800 km (Harte, 2010) on the basis of the inclusions trapped within them. Many of the inclusions are composites of multiple minerals and show evidence of retrograde transformation from lower-mantle (LM) or transition-zone (TZ) precursors, and their depth of origin is inferred. Howe...
Article
We describe a new methodology to collect energy domain Mössbauer spectra of inclusions in natural diamonds using a Synchrotron Mössbauer Source (SMS). Measurements were carried out at the Nuclear Resonance beamline ID18 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France). We applied this non-destructive approach to collect SMS spectra...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Triclinic CaSiO3 with walstromite-like structure is the dominant Ca-bearing phase in super-deep diamonds [1]. Such mineral is crucial to our understanding of the physical and chemical characteristics of the very deep Earth as it is considered the product of back-transformation from CaSiO3-perovskite, which is stable at lower mantle pressure and tem...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Inclusions in diamonds may provide direct samples from the otherwise inaccessible Earth's lower mantle, as was first suggested almost thirty years ago. Nevertheless, it is only in the last two decades that diamonds of a deeper origin have been identified as minor components from a number of kimberlitic and alluvial diamond deposits worldwide [1, an...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Diamonds are considered the unique way to trap and convey real fragments of deep material to the surface of our planet. Over the last thirty years, great strides have been made in understanding of Earth's lower mantle, mainly thanks to technological and instrumental advances; nevertheless, it is only in the last two decades that a whole range of in...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The study of the crystallographic orientations of minerals included in diamonds can provide an insight into the mechanisms of their incorporation and the timing of their formation relative to the host diamond. The reported occurrence of non-trivial orientations for some minerals in some diamonds, suggesting an epitactic relationship, has long been...
Article
Full-text available
In this work a single crystal of synthetic hercynite, FeAl2O4, was investigated by X-ray diffraction up to 7.5 GPa and at room temperature, in order to determine its pressure–volume equation of state. The unit-cell volume decreases non-linearly with a reduction of 3.4% (i.e. 18.43 Å3). The pressure–volume data were fitted to a third-order Birch-Mur...
Thesis
Coesite is one of the most studied phases in high-pressure mineralogy and petrology as it represents a real high-pressure marker characterized by an extremely simplified chemistry. For this reason, since its discover several scientists tried to use coesite as a geobarometer with the final aim to provide an exact value of crystallization pressure. H...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Due to their abundance in several geological environments, spinels cover a crucial role in geology. A high number of scientific papers have been published on their stability and behaviour and, more recently, several works focused on their elastic behaviour under extreme conditions of temperature and pressure, which can be used to retrieve the condi...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
WaveMetrics recommends Igor Pro users to avoid upgrading to Catalina. However, this is only due to the fact that third party XOPs may not run. I therefore wonder if anybody have tried to use Igor Pro on the latest MacOS operating system...

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
This ERC Starting Grant funded for 5 years to F. Nestola to determine the depths and growth mechanisms of diamond formation by characterising the mineral inclusions in diamonds. Key questions: 1. Are the mineral inclusions syngenetic or protogenetic with respect to the host diamonds? 2. At what pressure (and thus depth) were the inclusions trapped in the diamonds?