Cheryl Harasymchuk

Cheryl Harasymchuk
Carleton University · Department of Psychology

PhD

About

31
Publications
18,674
Reads
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318
Citations
Additional affiliations
July 2010 - present
Carleton University
Position
  • Professor

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Self-expansion in intimate relationships (i.e., broadening one’s perspective through engaging in novel, exciting activities with a partner) has been associated with relationship benefits. The goal of this study was to propose a motivational model of self-expansion to understand what prompts people to engage in self-expanding activities in their rel...
Article
This study examined the role of growth and security expectations in shaping people's judgments of relational boredom and conflict (for discriminant validity). In Studies 1 and 2, the type of expectation gaps (growth vs. security) in hypothetical relationships (as well as the occurrence of a gap in Study 2) was manipulated, and people's judgments of...
Article
Although engaging in exciting, shared activities with a partner is one strategy for warding off relational boredom , people might be less likely to pursue these activities when they are bored, which could have implications for the maintenance of passion in romantic relationships. In the current study, we assessed couple members' (N = 122 couples) d...
Article
The authors reviewed the literature on the meaning and experience of friendship for members of underrepresented groups (sexual orientation and gender diversity, race and ethnicity). It is argued that many of the variables that contribute to friendship formation among mainstream groups (found in past research) also apply to underrepresented groups (...
Article
Full-text available
The hypothesis that people experience greater friendship satisfaction when their friendship matches the prototype of intimacy interactions was tested. Consistent with this hypothesis, both women and men reported the greatest satisfaction when their “real world” friendship matched the prototype of intimacy interactions. This relation was even strong...
Article
There is a longstanding belief in relationship science and popular opinion that women are the barometers in mixed-gender relationships such that their perceptions about the partnership carry more weight than men’s in predicting future relationship satisfaction, but this idea has yet to be rigorously tested. We analyze data from two studies to test...
Article
Full-text available
Romantic partners often regulate their emotions and affection to achieve certain goals, but research has yet to explore how partners regulate their expression of sexual desire during sex and its implications for couples’ well-being. In two multi-part dyadic diary studies of primarily mixed-gender couples in longer-term relationships residing in Nor...
Article
Full-text available
Spending time with a romantic partner by going on dates is important for promoting closeness in established relationships; however, not all date nights are created equally, and some people might be more adept at planning dates that promote closeness. Drawing from the self-expansion model and relationship goals literature, we predicted that people h...
Article
Romantic passion represents one of the most fragile and elusive elements of relationship quality but one that is increasingly valued and tied to relationship and individual well-being. We provide the first examination of whether experiencing personal self-expansion-positive self-change and personal growth without a romantic partner-is a critical pr...
Article
Given the powerful implications of relationship quality for health and well-being, a central mission of relationship science is explaining why some romantic relationships thrive more than others. This large-scale project used machine learning (i.e., Random Forests) to 1) quantify the extent to which relationship quality is predictable and 2) identi...
Article
While sexual frequency and satisfaction are strong contributors to the quality and longevity of romantic relationships and overall well-being, mismatches in sexual desire between partners are common and have been linked with poorer satisfaction. Previous findings linking mismatches in desire with poorer relationship and sexual outcomes have typical...
Poster
Full-text available
The present study investigated the role of relational boredom and secure-base support in the pursuit of personal goals and shared leisure goals in romantic relationships. Relationship satisfaction was also examined. Assessment of both types of projects was made using Little’s (1983) Personal Project Analysis (PPA) where participants appraised these...
Article
In the early stages of romantic relationships, sexual desire is often intense, but over time, as partners get to know each other, desire tends to decline. Low sexual desire has negative implications for relationship satisfaction and maintenance. Self-expansion theory suggests that engaging in novel activities with a long-term romantic partner can r...
Article
A common reason why people in ongoing romantic relationships report engaging in sex with their partner—in addition to pursuing their own pleasure—is to meet their partner’s sexual needs. While meeting a partner’s needs with responsiveness and care is crucial in romantic relationships, it is important, especially in the domain of sexuality, that peo...
Article
According to interpersonal script models, people’s responses to relational events are shaped by the reaction they expect from a close other. We analyzed responses to dissatisfaction in close relationships from an interpersonal script perspective. Participants reported on how a close friend or romantic partner would react to their expressions of dis...
Article
Novel and exciting couple activities have been found to increase satisfaction in couples (e.g., Aron, Norman, Aron, McKenna, & Heyman, 2000), but only if both members enjoy the exciting activity (Girme, Overall, & Faingataa, 2014). We hypothesized that attachment anxiety might thwart the enjoyment and effectiveness of novel couple activities becaus...
Article
Full-text available
The goal of this study was to examine how people respond to relational boredom in the context of growth-enhancing (i.e., novel) and security-restorative (i.e., familiar) shared activities. In Study 1, people’s prescriptive and descriptive beliefs for responding to relational boredom were assessed. Next, we developed a prime of relational boredom (S...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Novel couple activities have benefits for relationship maintenance; however, challenges can impede engagement. Two studies examined how feelings of insecurity and uncertainty impact the likelihood of engaging in novel couple activities. In Study 1, participants in intimate relationships (N = 166) planned either an upcoming novel or familiar date wi...
Article
This study examined the role of attachment styles and relationship maintenance of a geographically-close and long-distance relationships. It was hypothesized that people in long-distance relationships would engage in more security maintenance processes and fewer growth maintenance processes. This effect was hypothesized to be amplified for people w...
Conference Paper
Shared novel couple activities (i.e., trying new things with a romantic partner) are an important relationship maintenance tool; however, little research has examined the challenges that are related with these activities. In two studies, we examined the frequency of these activities, the role of individual differences, and the associated challenges...
Article
Full-text available
Compassionate love has been identified as one of the major types of love experienced in relationships (Berscheid, 2010), but one that has been overshadowed by the study of romantic love. In this article, we review research on compassionate love, a relative newcomer to the close relationships field, and present findings that more fully flesh-out the...
Article
Full-text available
Boredom has been described as a major obstacle to maintaining lasting love (Aron & Aron (1986). However, empirical research on this important challenge to relationship maintenance has been hampered by the lack of an agreed-upon definition of the construct. We tested the hypothesis that relational boredom is amenable to a prototype conceptualization...
Article
Full-text available
Meaning-making, like much of coping research, has been conceptualized and assessed as an individual-centered phenomenon. On the premise that most traumas affect families as a whole, we assessed the extent to which meanings following a traumatic loss were congruent within families. Qualitative and quantitative data from family members coping with th...
Article
Full-text available
The goal of this research was to create a self‐report measure of relational boredom using a prototype approach. In the first study, 2 samples (participants in dating relationships and in marital relationships) generated features of the concept of relational boredom. In Study 2, these features were rated for prototypicality by 2 samples (dating and...
Article
Full-text available
The goal of this research was to examine relational boredom using a script approach Dating individuals (N = 99, Study 1) and married individuals from the community (N = 62, Study 2) generated causes of boredom in their relationship, associated feelings, and coping strategies Boredom was seen as caused by a lack of novelty and stimulation and was as...
Chapter
When people are asked what gives their lives meaning or what gives them joy or happiness, friends are invariably near the top, if not at the top of the list (see Fehr, 1996). When people's day-to-day interactions are tracked and they are asked, at random times, to report on what they are doing at the moment, with whom, and how they feel, it is time...
Article
Full-text available
We propose that the study of emotion in close relationships may be advanced through an integration of the emotion-in-relationships model (ERM) with interpersonal script models. In two studies, we tested the hypothesis that people experience emotion when expected patterns of relating are disrupted. We also predicted that the kinds of events that are...
Article
Full-text available
When asked about their perceptions of close others, individuals project their own feelings, attitudes, and relationship views onto these individuals. These perceptions may or may not be accurate but should influence relationship judgments. We found that women’s perceptions of their same-sex friend’s external locus of control predicted higher report...

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