Cheryl Benn

Cheryl Benn
Massey University · School of Health and Social Services

About

34
Publications
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516
Citations

Publications

Publications (34)
Article
Background: Little qualitative research has been done to explore the quality of breastfeeding support through social media in New Zealand. Aim: This article aims to explore the influence of social media on exclusive breastfeeding practice. Methods: A qualitative study involving face-to-face postpartum interviews with 30 mothers who were recrui...
Conference Paper
Exclusive breastfeeding practice is not limited to the intentions or actions of the mother-infant dyad. It is socially constructed and influenced by the actual and virtual social networks around the mother as well as the historical, socioeconomic, political, geographic and social contexts of the mother’s life.
Article
http://www.pediatricnursing.org/article/S0882-5963(17)30490-6/fulltext Scant published qualitative literature exists focusing on why exclusive breastfeeding rates decline between three and six months. This study aims to develop an understanding of why exclusive breastfeeding tails off so dramatically between three and six months after birth in New...
Article
Abstract: Aim: Support from family members has been found to influence intention, initiation and prolonged duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Drawing upon the narratives of women interviewed for this research, this paper aims to evaluate the impact of family culture on exclusive breastfeeding practice. Methods: A generic qualitative methodology...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Despite widespread consensus regarding the health benefits of breastfeeding, the prevalence of six months exclusive breastfeeding is very low in developed countries including New Zealand. Aim: This paper aims to evaluate the role that health professionals play in promoting exclusive breastfeeding in New Zealand. Methods: Qualitativ...
Article
Full-text available
ABSTRACT Aim: Little research has been done to investigate the influence of male family members’ support for breastfeeding. This article considers the influence of male partners and other male family members on the initiation and duration of exclusive breastfeeding. Methods: Thirty heterosexual New Zealand women who had identified in a short antena...
Article
This perspective paper draws attention to the rising rate of mastectomy (the removal of the entire breast) (El Saghir et al., 2007; Kummerow, Du, Penson, Shyr, & Hooks, 2015) and Contralateral Prophylactic Mastectomy (CPM) amongst the women of reproductive age worldwide (Sim et al., 2014; Stucky, Gray, Wasif, Dueck, & Pockaj, 2010; Wong et al., 201...
Article
Full-text available
BACKGROUND: When practicing as a lead maternity carer, the first author (IC) found that following a traumatic practice experience, there appeared to be very little emotional support for the midwife unless provided by colleagues or family. Midwives were expected to continue as if nothing had happened and they had not been affected in any way by the...
Article
Primary postpartum hemorrhage is a leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity internationally. Research comparing physiological (expectant) and active management of the third stage of labor favors active management, although studies to date have focused on childbirth within hospital settings, and the skill levels of birth attendants in facil...
Article
Midwives providing care as lead maternity caregivers in New Zealand provide continuity of care to women who may give birth in a variety of settings, including home, primary units, and secondary and tertiary level hospitals. The purpose of this study was to compare mode of birth and intrapartum intervention rates for low-risk women planning to give...
Article
This paper discusses findings from a research study that investigated the experience of being a breastfeeding woman in New Zealand. The study was motivated by a desire to better understand why the majority of New Zealand women wean their infants before 6 months of age, despite the benefits of prolonged breastfeeding being well accepted. Nineteen wo...
Article
Background There are unique issues for families when patients are hospitalised in non‑local tertiary settings. These challenges include facing the possibility of a loved one's death, especially in an environment devoid of familiarity and social support. This paper presents
Article
Full-text available
Decision making can be infl uenced by factors other than clinical indications. Consumerism is now part of health care with an expectation that in some situations services provide for the preferences of the individual (Fox, 2003). This can sometimes lead to a gap between what a woman may prefer and what may appear to be best clinical practice (Savag...
Article
To test the hypothesis that appropriate interventions delivered by midwives within usual primary maternity care, can assist women to stop or reduce the amount they smoke and facilitate longer duration of breast feeding. In a cluster randomised trial of smoking education and breast-feeding interventions in the lower North Island, New Zealand, midwiv...
Article
To determine attitudes, activity and confidence among general practitioners and midwives about smoking cessation practice, and use of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) during pregnancy and breastfeeding. A postal survey of 780 New Zealand health professionals providing maternity care. 274 GPs (82 practising obstetrics) and 184 midwives responded (...
Article
Full-text available
This study describes the development and evaluation of education programmes and associated resource materials to support smoking cessation and reduction, and breastfeeding promotion strategies for pregnant women who smoke, during usual primary maternity care by midwives. Education programmes and resource materials were developed by midwives and res...
Article
To explore the midwife's role in providing education and support for changes in smoking behaviour during usual primary maternity care. A qualitative study using a thematic approach to analysis of data collected in face-to-face interviews. Eleven women who had participated in the intervention groups of the MEWS Study, a cluster randomised trial of e...
Article
This paper reports the preliminary findings of a study of women planning a pregnancy and perinatal women with respect to their information needs and the sources of information they use. Fifty women, 7 planning a pregnancy, 30 pregnant and 13 postnatal, completed a questionnaire including questions about who they had approached for information about...
Article
There is growing realization that women's health and involvement in health care are essential keys to health for all. One way in which the midwifery profession can contribute to women's health is by providing high quality care during the six week postnatal review/checkup. A study in three provincial hospitals in the Port Elizabeth area showed that...
Article
Typescript (photocopy). Thesis (D.Cur.)--University of Port Elizabeth, 1994. Bibliography: leaves 192-194.

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
Focus on decision-making and 6 months exclusive breastfeeding
Project
Although we found several studies that show the possibility of breastfeeding in breast cancer survivors, especially in women who had breast conserving therapy [the removal of the tumour only, with treatment via radiation therapy] or unilateral mastectomy, we could not find any research on the protective effect of breastfeeding after breast cancer treatment regarding recurrence of breast cancer, or developing the second breast cancer for breast cancer survivors. We would like to pursue this research further.
Archived project
Despite widespread consensus regarding the health benefits of six months exclusive breastfeeding for mothers and infants, the prevalence of six months exclusive breastfeeding is very low in developed countries including New Zealand. This research contributes to the literature nationally and internationally through documenting influencing factors among New Zealand women and their family that relate to the practise of six months exclusive breastfeeding.