Cheng-Chwee Kuik

Cheng-Chwee Kuik
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia | ukm · Institute of Malaysian and International Studies (IKMAS)

Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins)

About

51
Publications
39,485
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
660
Citations
Introduction
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
February 2012 - present
National University of Malaysia (UKM)
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
June 1996 - January 2016
Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia
Position
  • Associate Professor; Senior Lecturer; Lecturer; Tutor

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Full-text available
Recent International Relations scholarships and policy publications have used the term “hedging” as an alternative to “balancing” and “bandwagoning” in describing small states’ strategies towards a rising power. In the case of Southeast Asian countries’ responses to a reemerging China, more and more analysts have asserted that none of the smaller s...
Article
Full-text available
The extant literature on alignment behavior has focused primarily on the macro dimensions, i.e. the typology, manifestations and implications of states’ alignment choices vis-à-vis the great power(s). Relatively few studies have examined the micro aspects of alignment choices. This article attempts to fill in the gap by unpacking the constituent co...
Article
Full-text available
This article argues that the U.S.–Southeast Asia relations under Obama have been driven and limited by a “partially converged hedging” process between the two sides. On the one hand, the United States has sought to push back and hedge against the longer-term risks of a rising challenger by mobilizing its alignment and diplomatic assets in Asia. The...
Article
Full-text available
This article analyzes Malaysia's alignment behavior visa -vis America and China, with a focus on explaining how the weaker state's insistence on hedging has both motivated and limited its defense links with the competing powers. Contrary to the conventional wisdom that regional states choose to align militarily with the rebalancing America to hedge...
Article
Full-text available
Hedging is one of the more commonly used but least studied concepts in international relations. This essay conceptualizes hedging and operationalizes it to the alignment choices of Southeast Asian smaller states. I define hedging as insurance-seeking behavior under situations of high uncertainty and high stakes, where a rational state avoids taking...
Article
As an innovative mode of China’s foreign direct investment, China’s overseas industrial parks are not only the main content of the Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) but also the practical carrier of policy transfer. However, most of the academic literature on the policy transfer of overseas industrial parks has regarded the host country as a passive l...
Article
Full-text available
This essay traces the structural sources of Malaysia's South China Sea policy. It argues that Malaysia's ‘light-hedging’ approach is primarily a smaller-state's response to growing systemic pressure arising from power asymmetry, rivalry, and uncertainties. The features of this approach are: an insistence on not taking sides, concurrent adoption of...
Article
Full-text available
Critics of “ASEAN Way” have often portrayed it as sluggish in making progress in regional integration. The criticism raises questions about ASEAN’s role in the development of physical connectivity. There is a lack of political economy studies on the subject, particularly on ASEAN’s role in rail transport connectivity. Hence this paper aims to addre...
Chapter
Full-text available
Malaysia and China have seen one of the most cordial and productive relationships in the Asia-Pacific throughout the post–Cold War era, one with implications beyond their bilateral ties. However, relations were tested through a series of unprecedented events in 2013–14. This article analyzes how the Beting Serupai incidents have impacted Malaysia’s...
Article
Full-text available
China’s South China Sea policy in recent years has been marked by a mix of maritime assertiveness and economic-diplomatic inducement. This article argues that this contradiction is a result of both structural drivers and domestic imperatives. Structurally, the perceived opportunity after the global fi nancial crisis and later, the perceived risk of...
Article
Full-text available
If “militarisation” is defined as an act of deploying military assets to pursue wider strategic ends, then all players of the South China Sea disputes have engaged in some forms of militarisation. China’s militarisation reflect three layers of target audiences: the United States (the main target), regional countries (the secondary target) and its d...
Article
Full-text available
A version of this op-ed appears in print on December 7, 2015, in The International New York Times
Article
Full-text available
Using Malaysia’s China policy as a case study of a smaller state’s response to a rising power, this article challenges the mainstream neorealist notion that the growing capability and geographical proximity of a rising power tend to induce fear among its weaker neighbours. By tracing the transformation of Malaysia’s China policy, the article’s find...
Article
Full-text available
This article explains Malaysia's US policy under Prime Minister Najib. It argues that to the extent that there is a “shift” in Malaysia's policy, its substance has been shaped by structural and domestic considerations. Structurally, in the face of a fast rising China, Malaysia is compelled to keep a more balanced relationship with all the major pow...
Chapter
Full-text available
Singapore's strategy toward the great powers is the story of how a vulnerable Lilliputian state has endeavoured to combine the use of astute stratagem and skilful diplomacy to manage its asymmetric relations with the big powers. By borrowing the strength of the political heavyweights to manoeuvre through the swift currents, the city-state reduces t...
Article
Full-text available
Recent International Relations scholarships and policy publications have used the term “hedging” as an alternative to “balancing” and “bandwagoning” in describing small states’ strategies towards a rising power. In the case of Southeast Asian countries’ responses to a reemerging China, more and more analysts have asserted that none of the smaller s...
Article
Full-text available
This article aims to study the origins and patterns of China's involvement in regional multilateral institutions, as well as its characteristics and implications for China's ASEAN policy in the post-Cold War era. To this end, the study focuses on China's participation in three ASEAN-initiated and -driven multilateral institutions, namely the ASEAN...

Network

Cited By