Chelsea Miller

Chelsea Miller
Holden Arboetum - National Science Foundation

PhD

About

7
Publications
1,081
Reads
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30
Citations
Introduction
I am an NSF Postdoctoral Fellow hosted in the Stuble Lab at the Holden Arboretum studying the impacts of climate change on the phenology of plant-insect interactions. I formerly worked as a postdoc at UGA studying the impacts of catastrophic wind disturbances on woodboring beetles the southeastern U.S. My PhD work at UTK focused on fine- and coarse-scale distributions of understory forest herbs in relation to reproductive life history traits, including seed dispersal by ants (myrmecochory).
Additional affiliations
September 2020 - May 2022
University of Georgia
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Description
  • Pestiferous coleopteran community dynamics in wind-disturbed forest ecosystems.
Education
August 2016 - May 2020
University of Tennessee
Field of study
  • Statistics
August 2014 - May 2020
University of Tennessee
Field of study
  • Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
August 2009 - May 2013
University of Central Arkansas
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (7)
Research Proposal
Full-text available
Correlational species distribution models (SDMs), which rely on the relationship between species occurrences and climate variables, have been used extensively to predict species distributions under conditions of climate change. However, SDMs have largely excluded the influence of critical biological processes, such as species interactions, local ad...
Article
Full-text available
Aim Abiotic, biotic and dispersal factors interact to shape species distributions. At broad geographic extents, abiotic factors are thought to exert the greatest influence on the distribution, while biotic and dispersal factors strongly influence the distribution regionally and locally. We test whether reproductive traits relating to biotic and dis...
Article
Full-text available
Abstract Morphological and chemical attributes of diaspores in myrmecochorous plants have been shown to affect seed dispersal by ants, but the relative importance of these attributes in determining seed attractiveness and dispersal success is poorly understood. We explored whether differences in diaspore morphology, elaiosome fatty acids, or elaios...
Article
Full-text available
The University of Tennessee Herbarium (TENN) presents a case study for modernizing an historic seed collection. TENN staff recently rediscovered the J. K. Underwood Seed Collection (ca. 1931–1964), containing over 700 unique specimens, hidden away in storage. We employed a series of curation actions to modernize the collection and render it useful...
Article
Full-text available
Premise of the Study Comparing ecological attributes of endemic species with related, widespread species can reveal differences accounting for rarity. Forests of the southeastern United States are home to many range‐restricted endemic and widespread species of Trillium, a genus of ant‐dispersed herbs. Evidence suggests that aspects of seed‐related...
Article
Full-text available
Fruit ripeness can be indicated through changes in chromaticity, luminance, odor, hardness, and size to attract seed dispersing animals. We quantified these attributes for both ripe and unripe fruits of 31 lemur-dispersed plant species in Ankarafantsika National Park, a tropical dry forest in northwestern Madagascar. We used spectroscopy, gas-chrom...
Research
Full-text available
Myrmecochory is typically cast as a mutualistic relationship in which seed dispersal of plants with elaiosome-bearing seeds is performed by ants. Benefits of this mutualism may seem simple at first: ants gain a nutritive reward via elaiosomes, while plant propagules gain protection and a more suitable microsite for establishment and growth. However...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
The goal of this project is to determine whether seed dispersal metrics, such as dispersal rate and dispersal distance, differ between co-occurring rare and common Trillium congeners in the field. To complement the field experiment, it is the goal of a laboratory "cafeteria" experiment to determine whether ant dispersers prefer the seeds of rare or common Trillium congeners under controlled conditions.