Chau Le

Chau Le
University of Lincoln · Lincoln International Business School

Doctor of Philosophy

About

13
Publications
1,629
Reads
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61
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
56 Citations
201620172018201920202021202205101520
201620172018201920202021202205101520
201620172018201920202021202205101520
201620172018201920202021202205101520
Introduction
Chau Le currently works at Lincoln International Business School, University of Lincoln. Chau has research interest in the area of International Finance, Banking and Financial Economics.
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - present
University of Lincoln
Position
  • Lecturer
September 2018 - September 2019
University of East Anglia
Position
  • Lecturer
April 2017 - present
University of Economics Ho Chi Minh City
Position
  • Lecturer
Education
May 2009 - May 2013
University of Birmingham
Field of study
  • Economics

Publications

Publications (13)
Article
This paper draws on transaction cost theory and network literature to examine how entrepreneurial network facilitates financial access for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in Vietnam. We characterize four major types of entrepreneurial network and find that network effects vary significantly, depending on the network members to whom entrep...
Article
This paper studies the spillovers of global liquidity and monetary policy divergence from advanced economies to Vietnam. Applying the structural Bayesian Vector Auto-Regressive model with Sims–Zha prior distribution, we find that unconventional monetary policy shocks of major central banks led to a reduction in inflation and short-term interest rat...
Article
Understanding the global financial network for sovereign debt, particularly with a focus on interaction and spillover effects of sovereign risk, has become important for policy makers as they look to protect the stability of their economies. Using high dimensional Vector Autoregression techniques and network simulation on Sovereign Credit Default S...
Article
Full-text available
Hybrid ownership—sharing partial business ownership with the state—is a new form of political connections that entrepreneurs in developing countries may employ to improve their access to key resources. This study investigates hybrid ownership as a strategic decision of entrepreneurs running small businesses in Vietnam—a transition economy. Utilisin...
Article
In Vietnam, following the process of financial liberalization, the rapid banking expansion has resulted in structural frangibility and bad debt proliferation with negative implication for bank performance. This is the first comprehensive study that evaluates the performance of the Vietnamese banking system at the start of the Global Financial Crisi...
Article
This paper aims to tell the "gamble of resurrection" story for small owner-managed firms. Analyzing a set of private firms in Vietnam, we find that firms that are less financially constrained, an increase in the degree of financing constraints leads to a decrease in the use of entrepreneurs' personal capital. However, once critical value of constra...
Article
In the transition economy of Vietnam, financial market is dominated by banking sector but commercial banks heavily rely on collateral-based lending. While the relationship between collateral and implied credit risk is still in debate, this paper provides additional empirical evidence regarding the heterogeneous effects and transmission channels of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper evaluates the structural effects of price regulations on inflation control in Vietnam and conducts market-based inflation forecast assuming different sets of macroeconomic scenarios. We apply SVAR models and the forecasting technique on the quarterly data for the period 2000 - 2015. The empirical results show two different regimes of pri...
Article
This paper studies the link between macro-financial variability and bank behaviour, which justifies the second-round effects of the global financial crisis on East Asia. Following Gallego et al. (The impact of the global economic and financial crisis on Central Eastern and South Eastern Europe (CESEE) and Latin America,2010), the second round effec...
Article
Full-text available
This article investigates the systemic risk of cross-border banking in East Asia. Using the recursive bivariate probit model, we jointly test the probability of the sudden stop in international lending and its simultaneous effect on the host countries’ interbank markets. The empirical results suggest that the risk of a sudden stop is associated wit...
Article
Full-text available
This paper investigates volatility linkages and financial contagion via the asset price channel from the US and Europe to East Asia during the 2007–2011 global financial crisis. Following crisis contingent theories, financial contagion is modeled as the structural change in transmission mechanism after a shock in one country (shift-contagion). Usin...
Conference Paper
This paper investigates the cross-border banking and transmission of interbank market tension from advanced economies to emerging markets during the global financial crisis. Using BIS banking statistics and the recursive bivariate probit model, we jointly test the probability of the sudden stop in international lending and its simultaneous effects...
Conference Paper
This paper examines the second round effect of the global financial crisis on East Asian economies, and assesses the role of bank regulatory capitals and central bank policy interventions to sustain this effect. Our study fills the gap on the current empirical literatures on the topic of the transmission of global shock among economies, which stron...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Project (1)
Project
The research objectives of our project are as follows: First, we explore to which extend the spillover of the GFC affected bank performance in Vietnam. This is explored by examining bank efficiency that is an appropriate way of measuring the changes in bank activities. In doing so, we advance the current theoretical framework on bank efficiency by incorporating into the methodological framework issue of 'undesirable outputs', i.e non-performing loans and risk factor. Secondly, we develop an innovative methodological framework that will determine whether the monetary transmission process (Bank Lending Channel - BLC) works differently under financial turbulence. Thirdly, to empirically test the main factors having an impact on BLC, ie. whether BLC is influenced only by bank’s size, capitalization and liquidity or whether bank efficiency and spillovers of monetary policy from developed economies matter as well.