Charlotte Regan

Charlotte Regan
UKCEH

PhD

About

24
Publications
2,679
Reads
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161
Citations
Education
September 2012 - September 2013
Imperial College London
Field of study
  • Ecology, Evolution and Conservation
September 2008 - July 2011
University of Southampton
Field of study
  • Zoology

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Understanding the relative importance of threats to species across their range is critical for large-scale conservation planning. Scaling-up localized research to inform the Canada-wide boreal caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou) recovery strategy epitomizes the challenge. Current policy draws heavily from data obtained at the southern front of rang...
Article
Full-text available
Collective behaviors are typical for many social species and can have fitness benefits for participating individuals. To maximize the benefits obtained from group living, individuals must coordinate their behaviors to some extent. What are the mechanisms that make certain individuals more likely to initiate collective behaviors, for example, by tak...
Article
Full-text available
While there is overwhelming evidence for phenological responses of animal and plant populations to climate change, most studies have been conducted at the level of entire populations, thus neglecting the scale at which much selection operates and at which animals and plants respond to their environments. Here, using data from a 60-year study, we de...
Article
Many aspects of sociality rely on individuals recognising one another. Understanding how, when, and if individuals recognise others can yield insights into the foundations of social relationships and behaviours. Through synthesising individual recognition research in different sensory and social domains, and doing so across various related social c...
Article
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The adult sex ratio (ASR) is important within ecology due to its predicted effects on behaviour, demography and evolution, but research examining the causes and consequences of ASR bias have lagged behind the studies of sex ratios at earlier life stages. Although ungulate ASR is relatively well‐studied, exceptions to the usual female‐biased ASR cha...
Article
Full-text available
Wild quantitative genetic studies have focused on a subset of traits (largely morphological and life history), with others, such as behaviors, receiving much less attention. This is because it is challenging to obtain sufficient data, particularly for behaviors involving interactions between individuals. Here, we explore an indirect approach for pi...
Article
Full-text available
Inter-individual variation in juvenile body size can have important consequences for individual fitness, population dynamics, and adaptive evolution. In wild vertebrate populations, larger juvenile size is usually expected to be selected for. However, understanding how such selection may translate into adaptive evolution requires an understanding o...
Article
Full-text available
Variability in host resistance or tolerance to parasites is nearly ubiquitous, and is of key significance in understanding the evolutionary processes shaping host-parasite interactions. While ample research has been conducted on the genetics of parasite burden in livestock, relatively little has been done in free-living populations. Here, we invest...
Thesis
Reproductive patterns in the natural world are highly variable both between- and within-species. For example, mammalian females within a single population often vary substantially in their expenditure into offspring, both before and after birth. Understanding the causes of variation in reproductive behaviour remains a key aim within evolutionary ec...
Article
Full-text available
Demographic senescence is increasingly recognised as an important force shaping the dynamics of wild vertebrate populations. However, our understanding of the processes that underpin these declines in survival and fertility in old age remains limited. Evidence for age‐related changes in foraging behaviour and habitat use is emerging from wild verte...
Article
Full-text available
Resource availability, through its impact on the costs and benefits of parental care, is expected to influence parental care behaviour. There has, to our knowledge, been no attempt to understand how variation in the resource use of wild individuals influences individual parental care behaviour. To understand how natural resource variability affects...
Article
Full-text available
When estimating heritability in free-living populations, it is common practice to account for common environment effects, because of their potential to generate phenotypic covariance among relatives thereby biasing heritability estimates. In quantitative genetic studies of natural populations, however, philopatry, which results in relatives being c...
Article
Full-text available
The role of habitat use in generating individual variation in fitness has rarely been examined empirically in natural populations of long-lived mammals, particularly for both sexes simultaneously. This is the case despite the increase in studies attempting to understand evolutionary change in such populations. Using data from the St. Kilda Soay she...
Data
Histograms of all non-binary traits used in the present analyses, with females in red and males in blue. Note that sex distributions are overlaid on one another and not stacked. Only data from sheep aged 4 and older are included. On the x-axes, number of rut consorts, faecal strongyle egg count, faecal coccidia oocyst count and home range area are...
Article
Full-text available
The degree to which changes in lifespan are coupled to changes in senescence in different physiological systems and phenotypic traits is a central question in biogerontology. It is underpinned by a deeper biological question about whether or not senescence is a synchronised process, or whether levels of synchrony depend on species or environmental...

Questions

Question (1)
Question
I'm trying to estimate the degree of space sharing by pairs of individuals using the adehabitatHR package. After reading up on potential overlap metrics I settled on Bhattacharyya's affinity, but I'm finding that in some cases the home range overlap of an individual with itself, is greater than 1. I'd like to understand why this is the case, so that I can determine how best to deal with the resulting matrix! Thanks in advance for any help!

Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Develop and expand the conceptual and methodological basis for home range estimation and modelling, and use it to obtain new ecological understanding.