Charlotte E R Edmunds

Charlotte E R Edmunds
Bath Spa University · School of Society, Enterprise and Environment

BSc, BSc, MSc, Ph.D

About

23
Publications
3,485
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115
Citations
Introduction
I am a Lecturer at Bath Spa University. I am also a Visiting Fellow in Warwick Business School at the University of Warwick. Generally, I am interested in investigating learning, categorisation and decision-making. That being said, I also collaborate on projects investigating Human-Robot Interaction. (Mainly focusing on the “human” aspect!) www.ceredmunds.com
Skills and Expertise
Additional affiliations
May 2017 - July 2017
University of Plymouth
Position
  • Research Assistant
October 2013 - November 2016
University of Plymouth
Position
  • PhD Student

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
A complete understanding of decision-making in military domains requires gathering insights from several fields of study. To make the task tractable, here we consider a specific example of short-term tactical decisions under uncertainty made by the military at sea. Through this lens, we sketch out relevant literature from three psychological tasks...
Article
Full-text available
jats:p>This article presents a discussion of the importance of power analyses, providing an overview of when power analyses should be run in the context of the field of Human-Robot Interaction, as well as some examples of how to perform a power analysis. This work was motivated by the observation that the majority of papers published in the proceed...
Article
Full-text available
The inverse base rate effect (IBRE) is a nonrational behavioral phenomenon in predictive learning. Canonically, participants learn that the AB stimulus compound leads to one outcome and that AC leads to another outcome, with AB being presented three times as often as AC. When subsequently presented with BC, the outcome associated with AC is prefere...
Preprint
Integral stimuli (e.g. colours varying in saturation and brightness) are classically considered to be processed holistically (i.e. as undifferentiated stimulus wholes); people analyze such stimuli into their consistent dimensions only with substantial time, effort, training, or instruction (Foard & Kemler Nelson, 1984). In contrast, Combination The...
Article
Full-text available
Analogical transfer has been previously reported to occur between rule-based, but not information-integration, perceptual category structures (Casale, Roeder, & Ashby, 2012). The current study investigated whether a similar pattern of results would be observed in cross-modality transfer. Participants were trained on either a rule-based structure, o...
Preprint
Preferential choices are often explained using models within the evidence accumulation framework: value drives the drift rate at which evidence is accumulated until a threshold is reached and an option is chosen. Although rarely stated explicitly, almost all such models assume that decision makers have knowledge at the onset of the choice of all av...
Article
Preferential choices are often explained using models within the evidence accumulation framework: value drives the drift rate at which evidence is accumulated until a threshold is reached and an option is chosen. Although rarely stated explicitly, almost all such models assume that decision makers have knowledge at the onset of the choice of all av...
Article
Full-text available
Smith and Church (2018) present a “testimonial” review of dissociable learning processes in comparative and cognitive psychology, by which we mean they include only the portion of the available evidence that is consistent with their conclusions. For example, they conclude that learning the information-integration category-learning task with immedia...
Preprint
The Inverse Base Rate effect (IBRE; Medin & Edelson, 1988) is a non-rational behavioral phenomenon in predictive learning. Canonically, participants learn that the AB stimulus compound leads to one outcome and that AC leads to another outcome, with AB being presented three times as often as AC. When subsequently presented with BC, the outcome assoc...
Article
Full-text available
In recent years, the field of Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) has seen an increasing demand for technologies that can recognize and adapt to human behaviors and internal states (e.g., emotions and intentions). Psychological research suggests that human movements are important for inferring internal states. There is, however, a need to better understa...
Preprint
Analogical transfer occurs when someone transfers insights about shared structure from one task to another. Here, we explore this ability in categorization tasks. Previous work found that people could transfer knowledge between two unidimensional rule-based tasks, but could not for two information-integration tasks. In four experiments, we extended...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
We conducted a study with 25 children to investigate the effectiveness of a robot measuring and encouraging production of spatial concepts in a second language compared to a human experimenter. Productive vocabulary is often not measured in second language learning, due to the difficulty of both learning and assessing productive learning gains. We...
Article
Full-text available
The study of the fine-grained social dynamics between children is a methodological challenge, yet a good understanding of how social interaction between children unfolds is important not only to Developmental and Social Psychology, but recently has become relevant to the neighbouring field of Human-Robot Interaction (HRI). Indeed, child-robot inter...
Article
Full-text available
The current article concerns human outcome-selective Pavlovian-instrumental transfer (PIT), where Pavlovian cues selectively invigorate instrumental responses that predict common rewarding outcomes. Several recent experiments have observed PIT effects that were insensitive to outcome devaluation manipulations, which has been taken as evidence of an...
Article
Full-text available
Behavioral evidence for the COVIS dual‐process model of category learning has been widely reported in over a hundred publications (Ashby & Valentin, 2016). It is generally accepted that the validity of such evidence depends on the accurate identification of individual participants' categorization strategies, a task that usually falls to Decision Bo...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Establishing common ground when attempting to disambiguate spatial locations is difficult at the best of times, but is even more challenging between children and robots. Here, we present a study that examined how 94 children (aged 5-8) communicate spatial locations to other children, adults and robots in face-to-face interactions. While standard HR...
Article
Full-text available
Evaluating human-robot social interactions in a rigorous manner is notoriously difficult: studies are either conducted in labs with constrained protocols to allow for robust measurements and a degree of replicability, but at the cost of ecological validity; or in the wild, which leads to superior experimental realism, but often with limited replica...
Article
Full-text available
In the phenomenon of transfer along a continuum (TAC), initial training on easy items facilitates later learning of a harder discrimination. TAC is a widely replicated cross-species phenomenon that is well predicted by certain kinds of associative theory (e.g., Sutherland & Mackintosh, 1971). A recent report of an approximately-opposite phenomenon...
Chapter
Full-text available
Formal modeling in psychology is failing to live up to its potential due to a lack of effective collaboration. As a first step towards solving this problem, we have produced a set of freely available tools for distributed collaboration. This article describes those tools and the conceptual framework behind them. We also provide concrete examples of...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Some argue that category learning is mediated by two competing learning systems: one explicit, one implicit (Ashby et al., 1998). These systems are hypothesised to be responsible for learning rule-based and information-integration category structures respectively. However, little experimental work has directly investigated whether people are consci...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
This paper examines the ability of a dual-system, formal model of categorization COVIS (Ashby, Paul & Maddox, 2011) to predict the learning performance of participants on the six category structures described in Shepard, Hovland and Jenkin's (1961) seminal study. COVIS assumes that category learning is mediated by two dissociable neural systems tha...
Article
Full-text available
The effects of two different types of training on rule-based and information-integration category learning were investigated in two experiments. In observational training, a category label is presented, followed by an example of that category and the participant's response. In feedback training, the stimulus is presented, the participant assigns it...

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