Charley Baker

Charley Baker
University of Nottingham | Notts · Division of Nursing

BA, MA, PhD PGCHE SFHEA

About

51
Publications
9,490
Reads
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289
Citations
Additional affiliations
March 2007 - present
University of Nottingham
Position
  • Lecturer in Mental Health
Education
September 2004 - April 2016
Royal Holloway, University of London
Field of study
  • English - Health Humanities

Publications

Publications (51)
Article
Full-text available
Nursing has evolved, yet media representation has arguably failed to keep up. This work explores why representation has been slow in accurately depicting nurses' responsibilities, impacts on public perceptions and professional identity. A critical realist review was employed as this method enables in-depth exploration into why something exists. A m...
Article
Purpose Adolescent mental health issues are on the increase, in particular depression, which is now a major public health concern globally. Mental health education is important and young people’s awareness of mental health is potentially limited. This is one factor that creates barriers to seeking support. School nurses and educational professiona...
Article
In comparing professional and lived experience views, it is clear that there are disparities between people's individual knowledge, mental healthcare needs and attitudes towards self harm and suicidality. This Virtual issue gathers together recently published articles that examine the experiences of people who self harm or experience suicidality an...
Article
Full-text available
Background Trial registration helps minimize publication and reporting bias. In leading medical journals, 96% of published trials are registered. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of randomized controlled trials published in key nursing journals that met criteria for timely registration. Methods We reviewed all RCTs published i...
Article
Full-text available
This feasibility study was framed under the notion of creative practices as mutual recovery – the idea that shared creativity, collective experience and mutual benefit can promote resilience in mental health and well-being. The study evaluated the impact of an art-based workshop designed to examine participant’s notions of home. Thematic analysis w...
Article
Full-text available
Dissociative Identity Disorder (DID) is an uncommon disorder that has long been associated with exposure to traumatic stressors exceeding manageable levels commonly encompassing physical, psychological and sexual abuse in childhood that is prolonged and severe in nature. In DID, dissociation continues after the traumatic experience and produces a d...
Article
The Journal has recently up-dated its guidelines for Reviews in order to provide authors with guidance on the types of reviews the Journal accepts and how these need to be structured. We want to publish reviews that are relevant to mental health nursing practice and/or consumers of mental health services but these reviews need to be rigorously desi...
Article
Purpose – It is now widely acknowledged that health care professionals on the front line of care delivery will often be among the first to whom patients or clients who have experienced abuse will present or disclose abuse in a clinical context. It is therefore of pivotal importance that all health care professionals, including nurses, are adequatel...
Article
Safeguarding vulnerable adults and children is a legal requirement and is essential in nursing and healthcare practice. This article describes the development and establishment of a structured approach to safeguarding education and student support in one pre-registration nursing programme in the UK. This approach involved the development of an acad...
Article
Accessible summary: What is known about the subject? There is very minimal research available on mental health (MH) student nurse perceptions of cultural phenomenon - specifically, the ways in which they differentiate between 'normal' and 'psychopathological' beliefs related to culture and religion. Work in cultural psychiatry suggests that other...
Article
The ‘multicultural clinical interaction’ presents itself as a dilemma for the mental health practitioner. Literature describes two problematic areas where this issues emerges - how to make an adequate distinction between religious rituals and the rituals that may be symptomatic of ‘obsessive compulsive disorder’ (OCD), and how to differentiate ‘nor...
Book
This is the first manifesto for Health Humanities worldwide. It sets out the context for this emergent and innovative field which extends beyond Medical Humanities to advance the inclusion and impact of the arts and humanities in healthcare, health and well-being. © Paul Crawford, Brian Brown, Charley Baker, Victoria Tischler and Brian Abrams 2015....
Book
Health Humanities draws upon the multiple and expanding fields of enquiry that link health and social care disciplines with the arts and humanities. It aims to encourage innovation and novel cross-disciplinary explorations of how the arts and humanities can inform and transform healthcare, health and well-being. It calls for a much richer body of w...
Chapter
Health humanities, from its valuable inception and discoursal development as the medical humanities through to its evolution into a ‘more inclusive and applied approach to humanities in healthcare’ , engages not only scholars and medics but all forms of ‘practitioners, healthcare providers, patients and their carers’ (Crawford et al., 2010, p. 8) a...
Chapter
There is a clear opportunity for the emergent field of health humanities to move to a whole new level of impact, with contributions from anthropology, narrative and literature to linguistics, music and visual art, as well as the very many arts and humanities-based knowledges and practices that it was not possible to include in this slim manifesto v...
Chapter
The title of this chapter could imply several things. First, it could cover the way evidence is derived from practice. Certainly, we will consider this later as this process is uniquely suited to the kinds of humanities interventions which are applied in healthcare contexts. Second, it could cover the kinds of evidence that may be needed in order t...
Chapter
There is a growing need for a new kind of debate at the intersection of the humanities and healthcare, health and well-being. In the recent past the field of medical humanities has grown rapidly, but it is timely and appropriate to address the increasing and broadening demand from other professions to become involved, to accommodate new sectors of...
Chapter
There is growing evidence which supports the therapeutic utility of visual art. In this chapter visual art is referred to interchangeably as art or visual art. This includes work on neuroaesthetics, art as therapy, art as an educational tool, and art used to enhance clinical and public environments. These will be considered in turn with reference t...
Chapter
The performing arts comprise an array of creative endeavours, in which artistic expression is conveyed through time, across a range of modalities and media, but which directly involves the performer herself or himself, within the artistic act, in some way (as opposed to creating an artefact, possibly to be subsequently shared, or displayed, with or...
Chapter
In this chapter we will consider the role of anthropology and the study of culture in the health humanities. Whilst there is a long tradition of medical anthropology — a field which has its own journals and many books — the relationship between this and the humanities has been less frequently thought about in a systematic way. Anthropology as it ha...
Chapter
In Chapter 3 we saw how narratives in fiction and in biographical writing have a role to play in the health humanities. In this chapter we will pursue the question of narrative a little further and consider the role it plays in shaping and helping us interpret the experience of illness, and the value of a narrative approach in helping us create a g...
Article
Full-text available
This paper seeks to think creatively about the body of research which claims there is a link between heavy metal music and adolescent alienation, self-destructive behaviours, self-harm and suicide. Such research has been criticised, often by people who belong to heavy metal subcultures, as systematically neglecting to explore, in a meaningful manne...
Book
The ‘Our Encounters with…’ series collect together unmediated, unsanitised narratives by service-users, past service-users and carers. These stories of direct experience will be of great benefit to those interested in narrative enquiry, and to those studying and practising in the field of mental health. This collection brings together a range of v...
Article
Full-text available
Since the invention of the service user as a medico-political category, service user involvement has been advocated by policymakers and researchers as a way of empowering clients and ensuring service responsiveness and accountability in mental health care in the UK. However, our experience of involvement in this field over the past three decades su...
Chapter
This volume is the first book of criticism to provide a systematic analysis of a corpus of emblematic contemporary British fictions from the combined perspective of trauma theory and ethics. Although the fictional work of writers such as Graham Swift has already been approached from this perspective, none of the individual works or authors under an...
Book
This is one of the first books to comprehensively explore representations of madness in postwar British and American Fiction. The book looks at representations of madness in a range of texts by postwar writers (such as Ken Kesey, Marge Piercy, Patrick McGrath, Leslie Marmon Silko, William Golding, Patrick Gale, William Burroughs and J.G. Ballard, t...
Article
Full-text available
This discussion paper reviews and critiques literature related to the evolution of the medical humanities as an academic discipline and its contribution to healthcare provision. We argue that despite considerable advances in the field of medical humanities, needs have been identified for a more inclusive, outward-facing and applied discipline. Thes...
Chapter
To writers, dramatists, health professionals, and the public at large madness has long been, and remains, a compelling preoccupation. Despite the attention madness has received in both medicine and in popular culture, it remains a diverse and enigmatic entity or experience, defying efforts to comprehensively and adequately comprehend, categorise an...
Chapter
In creating a single chapter on diversity issues in post-1945 literature, we face a number of basic difficulties. There is little consensus on what terms such as ‘diversity’ and ‘ethnicity’ mean. From the point of view of scholars in the health care disciplines who address the practical manifestations of ‘madness’, these generic terms can have a de...
Chapter
Literature has always shared a special space with madness, forming a synergetic relationship. Literature, very broadly speaking, focuses almost exclusively on the human mind and behaviour in one form or another. Felman suggests in the quote above that every literary text communicates in some way with madness, when madness is taken to mean much more...
Chapter
The theme of madness and creativity in fiction continues to inspire post-1945 writers who have been affected by mental illness or who want to comment on the link between mental distress and genius, for example Jenny Diski, Patrick Gale, Sylvia Plath, William Styron, and Susan Hill. Indeed, there is now a distinguished body of literature about the r...
Chapter
This passage comes from Patrick McGrath’s recent novel Trauma, and it seems appropriate to begin our concluding chapter with a quote from a fictional psychiatrist (Charlie Weir) who is willing to confess that the processes of psychiatry involve much ‘art’ — a view that goes against the increasingly dominant, biomedical models of madness. We take is...
Chapter
This chapter explores how madness fictions present issues of power and individual autonomy by focusing their narratives in and around psychiatric institutions such as the asylum or the day-care facility. Drawing upon historical fictions we can begin to build up a picture of how madness historically has been constructed, structured, and restructured...
Chapter
The post-war period of postmodernity provided a cultural and social milieu in which to discuss madness through a variety of discourses. Madness appeared, and continues to appear, to extend beyond occasional mental disruptions, through major mental illnesses and neuroses, to a base cultural condition. Both postmodernism and its literary outputs focu...
Article
Psychiatry studies the human mind within a medical paradigm, exploring experience, response and reaction, emotion and affect. Similarly, writers of fiction explore within a non-clinical dimension the phenomena of the human mind. The synergism between literature and psychiatry seems clear, yet literature--and in particular, fiction--remain the poor...
Article
Full-text available
This article describes the implementation and evaluation of a novel form of assessment of communication skills and knowledge for all branches of nursing students in a multi-campus UK Midlands university. The assessment took the form of a recorded scenario which was presented on DVD and a series of assessment questions inviting students to consider...
Article
The introduction of the long-awaited Mental Capacity Act (MCA) in 2005 was widely welcomed, as it provided a legal framework to protect individuals with limited or fluctuating mental capacity. The key principles underpinning the Act – that capacity is decision-specific and the person should be presumed to have capacity until proven otherwise, for e...
Article
Dictionaries can always be criticised for being too brief or too lengthy, for being too complex or too simple for the intended readership, and any omissions that might occur. However, this book seems to avoid most of the pitfalls. Clearly set out, thorough and easily understandable without being too basic, this text would be as valuable to a psycho...

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Project (1)
Project
http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42017053770