Charles V. Reed

Charles V. Reed
Elizabeth City State University | ECSU · Department of Social Sciences

Ph.D., University of Maryland

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31
Publications
1,125
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17
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Introduction
My second book project _An Empire of Justice: Britishness, Respectability, and Citizenship in Colonial South Africa, 1840-1923_ explores how colonial subjects of color in southern Africa and their allies in Britain and the empire fought for an inclusive “empire of justice” against the assembled forces of white supremacy. I

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Miles Taylor. Empress: Queen Victoria and India. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2018. Pp. 388. $35.00 (cloth). - Volume 59 Issue 2 - Charles V. Reed
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Chapter one examines the conceptual space between the projection of Queen Victoria as a symbol of empire and nineteenth-century royals often ambivalent attitude toward the empire and, particularly, the royal tours. It also describes the experiences of royal tourists of empire between the first royal tours of 1860 and the coronation durbar of 1911....
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Chapter three examines how colonial settlers imagined their relationships with a British ‘homeland’ and a larger British world. By examining the robust English-language print cultures in South Africa and New Zealand, the chapter explores how colonial settlers used the forum of the royal tour to self-fashion communal mythologies and identities in th...
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Chapter two examines how ‘native’ princes and chiefs in Africa, South Asia, and New Zealand encountered the empire and British royals during the tours of empire. In particular, the chapter focuses on the ways that princes and chiefs, through the royal tour, symbolically resisted British appropriation of local political traditions or used connection...
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Chapter five examines a different kind of ‘royal tour’, the pilgrimage of colonial subjects ‘home’ to Great Britain in order to petition the queen/king for justice. Culturally imbued with the notion of the Great (White) King/Queen, colonial subjects brought their cases against British or settler governments in the colonies to the metropole in hopes...
Chapter
The final chapter examines the royal tour through the lens of the 1911 coronation durbar and its aftermath. It argues that the durbar represented both the political and cultural pinnacle of the ritual apparatus developed during the second half of the nineteenth century, but also the ways in which it was unravelling in the years before the First Wor...
Book
Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860-1911 examines the ritual space of nineteenth-century royal tours of empire and the diverse array of historical actors who participated in them. The book suggests that the varied responses to the royal tours of the nineteenth century demonstrate how a multi-centred British imp...
Conference Paper
During the second half of the nineteenth century there emerged from the experiences of colonization, the making of an Atlantic diasporic community, the liberal-humanitarian discourse of anti-slavery and educational “uplift,” and the development of missionary schools in Britain’s South African empire a “class” of Western-educated African respectable...
Article
Theophilus Shepstone, Diplomatic Agent to the Native Tribes and later Secretary for Native Affairs in Natal, almost singlehandedly defined the relationship between the British colonial state and Africans living in the British colony for over thirty years between the 1840s and the 1870s. Brought to the Cape Colony from England as a toddler in 1820,...
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Thomas Allsen’s The Royal Hunt in Eurasian History is an ambitious and frequently insightful work of world history. It explores how “the hunt,” whether “out” in nature or in controlled spaces such as paradises or hunting parks, served to legitimize political authority in the premodern world, to demonstrate rulers’ symbolic power over animals—and, b...

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