Charles O'Reilly

Charles O'Reilly
Stanford University | SU · Graduate School of Business

About

86
Publications
37,690
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11,910
Citations

Publications

Publications (86)
Article
Research has shown that grandiose narcissists often rise to positions of power in organizations, even though there is little evidence that they perform better. Indeed, some studies show various deleterious effects on both their companies and the people who work for them. Prior research suggests that one reason for narcissist's success is that they...
Article
Research over the past decade has shown that grandiose narcissists are often successful at attaining leadership positions in organizations. However, there is no evidence that narcissists lead higher performing firms, and while they see themselves as more competent leaders, there is no evidence for this, either. In fact, research shows that narcissi...
Article
A substantial body of research has documented that grandiose narcissists are characterized by high self-esteem, a sense of personal superiority and entitlement, overconfidence, a willingness to exploit others for self-gain, and hostility and aggression when challenged. We report two studies (N = 452) that explore how these dispositions affect their...
Article
Transformational leaders challenge the status quo, provide a vision of a promising future, and motivate and inspire their followers to join in the pursuit of a better world. But many of these leaders also fit the American Psychiatric Association classification for narcissistic personality disorder. They are grandiose, entitled, self-confident, risk...
Article
The personality of leaders has been shown to have important effects on their followers. Recently, organizational researchers have become increasingly concerned with the potentially destructive consequences of narcissistic leadership. Evidence indicates that grandiose narcissists both aspire to and frequently achieve leadership roles in organization...
Article
Facing imminent disruption, many large, established firms have embraced innovation as a way to develop new growth businesses. To succeed in the face of disruptive change requires established firms to master three distinct disciplines: ideation, to generate potential new business ideas; incubation, to validate these ideas in the market; and scaling,...
Article
Although some researchers have suggested that narcissistic CEOs may have a positive influence on organizational performance (e.g., Maccoby, 2007; Patel & Cooper, 2014), a growing body of evidence suggests that organizations led by narcissistic CEOs experience considerable downsides, including evidence of increased risk taking, overpaying for acquis...
Article
In spite of the importance of organizational culture, scholarly advances in our understanding of the construct appear to have stagnated. We review the state of culture research and argue that the ongoing academic debates about what culture is and how to study it have resulted in a lack of unity and precision in defining and measuring culture. This...
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Full-text available
Despite rhetoric supporting the advancement of women on corporate boards, meager evidence supports significant progress over the past decade in the United States. The authors examine archival board data (for more than 3,000 U.S. publicly traded firms) from 2002 to 2011 and find that a female is most likely to be appointed to a corporate board when...
Article
Full-text available
Leadership development is often cited as an important organizational priority. Despite the criticisms of MBA education, MBA graduates represent one important source of future leaders. Although we have amassed significant knowledge about the roles and functions of senior leaders, we know far less about the challenges faced by younger ones. Indeed, L...
Article
The central argument for increasing the number of women on corporate boards of directors has been the so-called "business case for diversity" which proposes that women and minorities add valuable new perspectives that result in enhanced corporate performance. Unfortunately, the empirical evidence for this claim is mixed, leading some researchers to...
Article
Full-text available
Previous research shows that masculine (agentic) women suffer from a backlash effect in which they are sanctioned for violating the feminine gender role stereotype. We examine the impact of self-monitoring on the promotion rates of MBA men and women over an 8-year period following graduation. Results show that women who were more masculine as well...
Article
This study examined relationships among trait positive affect, organization changes, and satisfaction using a longitudinal sample. Results show that employees higher in positive affect had higher salary expectations, and changed organizations more frequently. For these individuals, changing organizations more frequently led to lower overall job, ca...
Article
The notion of "corporate culture" has received widespread attention in the past several years. But what is meant by the term and why should managers be concerned with it? Culture can be thought of as a mechanism for social control. As such, culture is important for both the implementation of strategy and as a mechanism for generating commitment amo...
Article
As professional schools, business schools aspire to couple research rigor with managerial relevance. There has been, however, a concern that business schools are increasingly uncoupled from practice and that business school research lacks real-world relevance. This relevance-rigor gap affects the quality of our teaching as well as the institutional...
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Full-text available
The authors integrate two complementary streams of research on “fit” that document positive impacts of similarity and negative effects of dissimilarity. Fit with an organization's culture typically focuses on similarity in values whereas relational demography examines similarity in demographic attributes. Although both streams emphasize fit and dra...
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Full-text available
Attitudes among 178 professional men and women working for a clothing manufacturer and retailer depended on their work groups' sex composition. Findings were consistent with status considerations: women expressed a greater likelihood of leaving homogeneous groups than did men, even though women expressed greater commitment, positive affect, and per...
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Full-text available
A combined programme entailing separate managerial and personality assessment staffs was employed to explore the construct validity of managerial performance dimensions. For a sample of 119 MBA (Master of Business Administration) candidates, principal components analysis of mean ratings on 14 managerial performance dimensions identified a Strategic...
Article
Diversity and teamwork are two themes that characterize the writing about the future of organizations. We explore the effects of age, tenure, sex, and race/ethnicity on teamwork. Results show that the more different an individual is from the group, the less teamwork. Further, there are important differences in sex and race/ethnicity in this pattern...
Article
One outgrowth of the person-situation debate has been the use of fit or congruence models to explain work outcomes. In this study, the profile-comparison process, a Q-sort-based technique that provides an isomorphic assessment of job requirements and individual competencies, was used to assess person-job fit in 7 small samples representing a variet...
Article
Full-text available
The notion of “corporate culture” has received widespread attention in the past several years. But what is meant by the term and why should managers be concerned with it? Culture can be thought of as a mechanism for social control. As such, culture is important for both the implementation of strategy and as a mechanism for generating commitment amo...
Article
Full-text available
This study examined economic and psychological factors that may influence the setting of CEO compensation levels and tested both a tournament model and a social comparison model. Using data from 105 Fortune 500 firms, conventional economic determinants such as size and profitability were found to be only weakly related to CEO compensation. A test o...
Article
This study examined the effects of observed and experienced rewards and punishments on positive and negative behaviors and satisfaction with supervision. Results showed that experienced rewards were associated with higher levels of positive behaviors and observed punishments with lower levels of negative behaviors. Both experienced and observed rew...
Article
Examines the importance of organizational demography on turnover. Relationship between turnover among nurses and local unemployment rate; Comparison of the degree of inequality or heterogeneity in length of service among nurses; Sources of satisfaction of dissatisfaction for nurses.
Article
The impact of accurate information about a new job, sources used in obtaining that information and the usefulness of the information sources on subsequent turnover was examined. Results for 97 MBAs indicate that two-year turnover was reduced for those individuals who had accurate job information and relied on useful information sources in making th...
Article
This study explores the proposition that turnover is partly a function of the demography of organizational subunits. Results show that, controlling for alternative explanations, academic departments with a dominant older cohort and those with substantial gaps between cohorts are characterized by increased rates of voluntary retirements, resignation...
Article
When confronted with failure, previous research has shown that decision makers may escalate their commitment to the failing course of action. The present study demonstrates that subjects may also attempt to justify their position by manipulating information which is to be presented to others. Effects of information manipulation were found, in a lab...
Article
In a field study, decision makers were found to choose information sources based on accessibility rather than quality. Some variation in source use was associated with individual characteristics such as motivation and tenure. Implications of the results are discussed for studies of communication and decision making.
Article
In collective bargaining, the nurses' definition of a situation might be quite different from that of health service management; thus, their reasons for striking and their assessment of the bargaining issues would not be congruent with those of management.
Article
This study examines how first-level supervisors identify and manage marginal employees. It was expected that supervisors would differ both in their approaches to marginal employees and in their willingness to use negative sanctions (informal warnings, formal warnings, and dismissals). Results corroborated these expectations and showed a significant...
Article
The study reported here examines the extent to which variations in the perceptions of job characteristics may be associated, not with objective task characteristics, but with perceptual biases reflecting individuals' frames of reference and general job attitudes. Results show that perceptual assessments of task characteristics vary with the individ...
Article
A survey of 89 public health nurses in a California county explored factors that might account for the growing support of unions and subsequent militancy among nurses. As predicted, changes in the backgrounds of public health nurses have occurred over time: 1) older nurses are more likely to have graduated from a diploma program and to have parents...
Article
This report summarizes the results of several laboratory andfield studies in-vestigating antecedents to and consequences of the intentional distortion of information by senders in organizational communication networks. Lab-oratory studies were used to examine the impact of two interpersonal vari-ables (trust in the receiver, perceived influence of...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D. in Business Administration)--Univ. of California, June 1976. Bibliography: leaves 88-98.
Article
The use of the supervisor as a source of information for subordinates who are decision makers was investigated with 72 eligibility workers in a county welfare agency. Results show that work group supportiveness was highly associated with frequency of use and value attached by subordinates to supervisors as sources of information. Supportiveness was...
Article
An intervention activity commensurate with specific organizational goals, directed to short-term change efforts to alter employee perceptions about their satisfaction, about such work activitiesas communication, and about opportunities to make job-related innovations was implemented for emergency room personnel in a large West Coast metropolitan ho...
Article
By using a questionnaire designed to assess 15 aspects of communication, data was collected from 327 respondents in 10 branch organizations (5 in the U.S. and 5 in the U.K.) of similar size, staffing, function, and physical plant. Analyses demonstrated that it was possible to differentiate these apparently homogeneous units based on perceptions of...

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