Charles R Menzies

Charles R Menzies
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC · Department of Anthropology

PhD

About

52
Publications
14,679
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592
Citations
Introduction
Charles Menzies is a member of Gitxaała Nation and a Professor of Anthropology in the Department of Anthropology at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, BC.Menzies' primary research interests are the production of anthropological films, natural resource management (primarily fisheries related), political economy, contemporary First Nations' issues, maritime anthropology and the archaeology of north coast BC.
Additional affiliations
July 2013 - present
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • Professor (Full)
July 2004 - June 2013
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
July 1996 - June 2004
University of British Columbia - Vancouver
Position
  • Faculty Member
Education
September 1990 - June 1998
CUNY Graduate Center
Field of study
  • Anthropology

Publications

Publications (52)
Article
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This is an autoethnographic account of the 1991 City University of New York (CUNY) strike movement. The authors were some of the key organizers of the strike. Student mobilizations were not narrowly framed to oppose tuition hikes but conceptualized as resistance against austerity measures and the expanding war economy. This article reflects on the...
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This is a response to, and rebuttal of, a paper by David Henige purporting to debunk oral history.
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Book
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In People of the Saltwater, Charles R. Menzies explores the history of an ancient Tsimshian community, focusing on the people and their enduring place in the modern world. The Gitxaala Nation has called the rugged north coast of British Columbia home for millennia, proudly maintaining its territory and traditional way of life. People of the Saltwat...
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This paper examines the development of the Irish pelagic fleet and how it has impacted place-based fishing livelihoods in southwest County Donegal, both positively and negatively. As part of this effort, we consider how shifting local and global sociopolitical realities have shaped linkages between resource access and people-place connections in so...
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This paper explores the question "why does abalone appear absent from mainstream archaeological findings?" This question is approached from within an explicitly Indigenous framework wherein tools of mainstream disciplines, such as archaeology, are appropriated within the Indigenous framework (rather than the other way around). Drawing upon material...
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A veritable gold rush of oil and gas exploration and export development is washing along the coast of western Canada. This paper explores the contemporary setting and possibilities for collaborative research with Indigenous communities in the face of large-scale corporate interventions and the history of colonization. Drawing upon two decades of re...
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This issue consists of three sections: a feature article on mentoring; a specially curated retrospective set of papers on collaborative anthropology past, present, and future; and a set of reviews edited by Ashley Kistler. Nancy Parezo, the guest editor for the retrospective, outlines the core issues and ideas of her selection of papers so I will n...
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With this new issue of Collaborative Anthropologies we are inaugurating a new phase of the journal. Founded in 2007 by Luke Eric Lassiter, Collaborative Anthropologies has become a major forum for anthropologists and those in related fields to discuss the ethics, dilemmas, methodologies, and debates associated with a range of collaborative research...
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The relationship between Indigenous peoples and the academics who study us is fraught with the memories of Western colonialism and its attendant history of disruption and appropriation. Perhaps if it was only a memory we could creatively reinvent the past and get on with it. But it is our present too. As I write this, a large multinational corporat...
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The butterflies—people from outside—are now part of our world. The first contact between butterflies and First Nations actually happened in our area. Our old people saw those big ships coming. At first they thought it was a monster actually coming over. But then they saw these are new people from far away. Some of the names that we carry today in G...
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Early ethnographic field schools used the "field" of indigenous communities as a laboratory. Today's schools, like our program at the University of British Columbia (UBC), are more likely to involve collaboration with an indigenous community or organization and to be based upon principles of service learning (S. Beck 2006; Iris 2004; Lamphere 2004)...
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In the face of aggressive overfishing of bilhaa (abalone) by non-Indigenous commercial fishermen, the Canadian Department of Fisheries and Oceans closed all forms of harvesting of bilhaa. This paper describes the longstanding ecologically appropriate harvesting practices of Gitxaała, an indigenous nation on the northwest coast of North America. The...
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General introduction to theme issue.
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The Indigenous Foundation of the Resource Economy of British Colum-bia's temperate rainforest is often described as pristine, virgin, or untouched. While some critics may decry the impact of industrial resource extraction upon the landscape, they typically do so by referencing an Edenic, pre-contact setting in which indigenous people – if they are...
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The historical abundance of salmon along the west coast of North America has been significantly reduced during the last two centuries of industrial harvest. Commercial fisheries from California to Alaska and points in between have faced clearly documented restrictions on fishing effort and collapse of specific salmon runs. Even while salmon runs on...
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Dancing between review and argument this paper lays out a foundation for a class-struggle anthropology -that is, an anthropological practice that can be linked to the ultimate goal of achieving a classless society. To this end we will review those anthropologists who have gone before us, pulling out those works of theirs that we see as critical in...
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Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Natural Resource Management examines how traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) is taught and practiced today among Native communities. Of special interest is the complex relationship between indigenous ecological practices and other ways of interacting with the environment, particularly regional and national pr...
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Introduction to volume 1 and to the inaugural issue of New Proposals
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The last decades of the 20th century were tumultuous ones for anthropol- ogy. The traditional fields of anthropological research—the external and internal colonials of imperial powers such as Britain, France, and the United States—began a process of decolonisation which challenged past research practices. During the 1960s and 1970s essential aspect...
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Small-scale, family fi shing enterprises manage to persist despite the diffi cult economic and ecological changes and disruptions they almost constantly have expe-rienced during the past several decades. Drawing upon long-term ethnographic and historical research in the Bigouden region of France, this paper asks why and how family-based fi shing en...
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This paper explores the social dissonance between the stories told by women from fishing families and those told about them in the Bigouden region of Brittany, France. In this paper I draw upon stories told by and about women collected in the course of ethnographic research in the fishing communities of this region since 1992. Women from local fish...
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Co-operative forms of enterprise are often held up as a progressive, moderate alternative to the privations of the capitalist market economy. This paper considers the Prince Rupert Fishermen's Co-op and its relations with organized labour in the north of British Columbia. The paper describes a contradiction within the co-op based on the possibiliti...
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The American Indian Quarterly 25.3 (2001) 409-430 In the context of contemporary treaty making and recent Euro-Canadian court decisions reaffirming Aboriginal rights and title, it is more important than ever before to understand the pivotal role played by First Nations in the development of British Columbia's resource-based economy. Unfortunately,...
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In this article the author draws upon his field work in Le Guilvinec, France during a period of crisis in the local fishery to explore the creation and reproduction of a local Bigouden identity. This identity emerged, replete with costume, rituals and festivals, out of an encounter between a metropolitan-driven industrial capitalism and a local, es...
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This article discusses the opposition of Euro-Canadian fishers to First Nations' land claims in British Columbia, Canada. The author draws upon his personal experience growing up in a fishing family from northern British Columbia to draw out the complexities of this conflict The object of the article is not to convince the reader of the rightness o...
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This study examines a community of 'co-operators' in which fishers of disparate social classes are united in a collective project, the Prince Rupert Fishermen's Co-operative Association.s In this fishers' co-operative, crew members - who own "nothing but their own labour" - join their skippers in an explicit coalition to defend "their business." To...
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This paper charts the path of one fishing crew's resistance to the attempts of their skipper to force them to comply with his wishes over the course of the fishing season by drawing upon the personal journals of the author, a commercial fisher of twelve years. The struggle, between skipper and crew, capital and labour, manifests itself on fishing v...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Land-based research deploying a range of techniques to understand the traditional territory of Gitxaala Nation.