Charles Goodwin

Charles Goodwin
University of California, Los Angeles | UCLA · Department of Applied Linguistics

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90
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Publications

Publications (90)
Article
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Faconner l’action humaine L’action joue un role central dans le langage humain et dans la socialite humaine (Enfield et Levinson ed., 2006 ; Levinson, 2012 ; Sacks et al., 1974). Dans l’interaction en face a face, l’organisation intrinsequement dialogique du langage (Linell, 2009) peut etre decrite comme un processus emergent et multipartite, qui a...
Chapter
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school, and to Chil and his family, for allowing me access to relevant events in their lives, which made the analysis developed in this paper possible. I thank Candy Goodwin, Makoto Hayashi, John Haviland, Adam Kendon, David Wilkinson, and the participants at the Max Planck Workshop on Pointing Gestures, organized by Sotaro Kita for insightful and...
Chapter
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Gesture-first theories of language propose the transparent intelligibility of deictic and iconic gestures. The gestures of a man with a three-word vocabulary are used to investigate gesture without accompanying language. Rather than being transparent, the rich intrinsic meaningfulness of deictic and iconic gestures produces a surplus of possible re...
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Focusing on a range of features that are central to the constitution of action, this article is an empirically based theoretical contribution to the field of research attempting to understand how human sociality is established and sustained. Human action is intensely, perhaps uniquely, co-operative. Individual actions are constructed by assembling...
Chapter
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This chapter argues that emotion is organized as interactive practice, rather than as the expression of experience that has its primary locus in the private life of the individual. Analytically this means that the displays of emotion performed by an individual must be analyzed in reference to not only her own body but also the bodies of those with...
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Making use of videotaped recordings of interaction in cars filmed as middle class families pursue their daily activities, we examine some of the ways in which talk while driving includes as parts of its intrinsic organization ongoing attention to phenomena beyond the stream of speech. Important consideration is given to issues posed by the task of...
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How participants to a joint activity come to develop a shared or mutual understanding of what they are perceiving has long been a problematic issue for philosophers, sociologists, and linguists. We examine the abstract model proposed by Clark and Marshall (1981) whereby speakers and hearers construct mutual knowledge and by which discrepancies in d...
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Human action is built by actively combining materials with intrinsically different properties into situated contextual configurations where they can mutually elaborate each other to create a whole that is both different from, and greater than, any of its constitutive parts. This has a range of consequences for the organization of language, action,...
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A interacao humana e constituida pela combinacao ativa de materiais com propriedades intrinsecamente diversas, em configuracoes contextuais situadas, onde eles podem mutuamente elaborar um ao outro para criar um todo que e diferente e maior que suas partes constituintes. Isso gera uma serie de consequencias na organizacao da linguagem, acao, conhec...
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Formal linguistics places an idealized speaker-hearer at the center of human language (Chomsky 1965; Saussure 1966). Hearers, who are largely though not completely silent, are however, given very little attenion. Most analysis of language, including the study of talk-in-interaction, focuses almost exclusively on phenomena embedded within the stream...
Article
As our contribution to this special issue, we examine how understandings of objects are talked and worked into being within concerted action. We will argue that formal procedure can serve as a resource in this regard. Procedures make relevant certain kinds of objects, objects that serve as its materials, tools, end-products, agents, etc. Our analys...
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Despite a vocabulary that consists of only three words Yes, No and And, Chil acts as a powerful speaker in conversation. He does this, embedding his limited lexicon within larger contextual configurations in which different kinds of meaning making processes including prosody, gesture, sequential organization, and operations on his talk by his inter...
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Seeing is investigated as a socially situated, historically constituted body of practices through which the objects of knowledge that animate the discourse of a profession are constructed and shaped. Analysis of videotapes of archaeologists making maps and lawyers animating events visible on the Rodney King videotape focuses on practices that are a...
Conference Paper
Using as data videotapes of archaeologists working to see and map structure in the dirt they are excavating, meaning-making in the home of a man with severe aphasia, and sequences of actual talk-in-interaction, this talk will investigate action, cognition, language use and things as phenomena constituted through actual agent-object inter-action. Ra...
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This article examines how a man able to speak only three words because of a severe stroke is nonetheless able to act as a competent speaker, indeed position himself as the teller of a complex story, by linking his limited talk and embodied action to the talk and action of others. This suggests a view of what it means to be a speaker that does not t...
Chapter
IntroductionParticipation as ActionStories as Participation FieldsParticipation in Linguistic AnthropologyConclusion
Article
Note: Transcription symbols follow those developed by Gail Jefferson, and are explained in the Appendix to this special issue. The coding of gaze, head nods, and similar phenomena is explained in the text.
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The organization of embodied participation frameworks, stance and affect is investigated using as data a sequence in which a father is helping his daughter do homework. Through the way in which they position their bodies toward both each other and the homework sheet that is the focus of their work the two contest the interactive and cognitive organ...
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Considerable attention has been paid in the CA literature to the glossing practices through which participants in conversation formulate who they are, what they are talking about, where the things they are talking about are located, and so forth. There are, of course, gestural glossing practices as well. For any concept or category presented gestur...
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Analysis focuses on how utterances opposing another position in an argument are constructed with a simultaneous orientation to (a) the detailed structure of the prior utterance being opposed and (b) the future trajectories of action projected by that utterance, which the current utterance attempts to counter and intercept. Through such practices pa...
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The study of linguistics is at an interesting juncture. The Chomskian claims about the Language Acquisition Device and Universal Grammar are essentially neurobiological claims and evolutionary biological claims. However, until recently our evolutionary and neurobiological knowledge was insufficient to directly address these areas. Now with what we...
Conference Paper
An omni-relevant issue for workplace studies is how participants engaged in joint activity make sense of the objects that constitute their shared material environment. In this study we examine a surgery taped in a teaching hospital to explore how formal procedures make relevant certain sorts of objects and, at the same time, are constituted through...
Chapter
Introduction In 1929, V. N. Volosinov (1973) argued that the linguistics of his time was seriously flawed because it took as its primary object of study language structures that were isolated from both context and the social life of their speakers. He proposed that this situation could be remedied by focusing on reported speech, utterances in which...
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To describe one scene, a speaker can make use of materials imported from a second. In this article, I investigate how recipients as well as speakers attend to the simultaneous presence of multiple scenes in their talk. Among the phenomena examined are (a) local metrics in which features of the current scene are used to describe a narrated one and (...
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Chapter
This chapter will use videotapes of young archaeologists learning how to see and excavate the traces of an ancient village in the soil they are digging to explore some of the ways in which the human body is implicated in the structuring of human language, cognition and social organisation. Clearly the part played by the body in such processes can b...
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This paper examines embodied procedures for producing disagreement turns in the midst of the children's game of hopscotch. Turn shape, intonation, and body positioning are all critical to the construction of stance towards a player's move in the game. In particular, in formulating a player's move as “out” foul calls can state unambiguously, without...
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One effect of the way in which human action is constituted and shaped within a rich multimodal ecology of sign systems is that participants orient to multiple orders of temporality simultaneously. Within talkininteraction, linguistic structure provides resources that can be used simultaneously to (1) structure time in the world being represented th...
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this paper. 25 However, one feature of it relevant to the construction of the utterance being examined in this paper will be briefly noted. A speaker can request the gaze of a recipient by producing a phrasal break, such as a restart or a pause, in his utterance. After such a phrasal break nongazing recipients regularly bring their gaze to the spea...
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This paper both investigates social practices used to build meaning when one participant lacks the ability to produce language, and questions the notion that pointing is a simple, primitive technique for doing reference. A sequence in which a man able to speak only three words initiates a line of action by pointing is used to demonstrate that point...
Article
A theory of action must come to terms with both the details of language use and the way in which the social, cultural, material and sequential structure of the environment where action occurs figure into its organization. In this paper it will be suggested that a primordial site for the analysis of human language, cognition, and action consists of...
Article
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Color categories sit at the intersection of 2 central topics in the study of human cognition: (a) the analysis of vision, and (b) the study of semantic categories, or more generally processes of classification. Using as data videotape of archaeologists filling out a coding sheet that requires them to systematically describe the color of the dirt th...
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This special issue presents a range of analytic resources for the study of how human vision--as historically structured, interactively organized, and temporally unfolding discursive practice mediated by artifacts of many different kinds--plays a crucial role in the ongoing constitution of the events that make up the lived social world in which work...
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In what remains one of the central accomplishments of cognitive anthropology, Berlin and Kay (1969) demonstrated that the diversity of human color systems was built on a universal infrastructure, with black and white being the most basic colors in all systems. The analytical focus of their work is a structural system divorced from the messy tasks o...
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Through an observation of the ways in which various categories of airport employees watch the aeroplanes, the authors analyse the processes in which ordinary and routine activities are inscribed. This forms the basis of their integrated research project on language, culture, social organization and an historically constituted material world. The si...
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*Research in this paper grows out of The Workplace Project, a collaborative research project devoted to the analysis of work as situated practice in multi- activity settings which was initiated by Lucy Suchman at Xerox PARC and funded by the Steelcase Corporation. Conversations with other members of the project — Françoise Brun-Cottan, Kathy Forbes...
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I am most deeply indebted to Rob, his family, and nurse for allowing me access to their lives. My understanding of what is happening in these data has been greatly helped by comments from Lisa Capps, David Goode, Anita Guynn, Russell Harless, Cathryn Houghton, Sally Jacoby, Minna Laakso, Melissa Lefko, Alycia Myhrer, Elinor Ochs, Kersten Priest, Cu...
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On oceanographic research vessels, scientists from different disciplines must work together to obtain samples from the sea beneath their ship. Such juxtaposition of not just theory, but actual laboratory practice, creates unique possibilities for synergy, as members of one discipline make use of the tools of another. Using videotapes of technicians...
Article
1. Rethinking Context: an introduction Charles Goodwin, and Alessandro Duranti 2. The indexical ground of Deictic Reference William F. Hanks 3. Language in context and language as context: the Samoan respect vocabulary Alessandro Duranti 4. Context contests: debatable truth statements on Tanna (Vanuatu) Lamont Lindstrom 5. Contextualization, tradit...
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The abstract for this document is available on CSA Illumina.To view the Abstract, click the Abstract button above the document title.
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Using as data videotapes of conversation in natural settings, this paper investigates (1) how displaying uncertainty is organized as interactive activity, (2) how this activity can be used to modify the participation framework of the moment, (3) the consequences this has for subsequent interaction and (4) how such events can invoke larger social id...
Article
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Once assessments and continuers are focussed on as distinguishable phenomena it becomes clear that they differ from each other not just in the details of their sequential placement within an extended turn, but in other significant ways as well. First, though assessments can take the form of talk with clear lexical content (for example `Oh wow' and...
Article
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This paper investigates how an audience and the interpretive work in which it is engaged are constituted through a dynamic process of ongoing interaction. Analysis focuses first on how the topic of the talk in progress can both provide an arena for displaying competence and expertise, and differentiate members of an audience from each other in term...
Article
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In this paper gesture will be studied by analyzing in some detail its organization within a particular activity, searching for a word. Such an approach is quite different from others that often study such phenomena by isolating gesture from the local, interactive circumstances of its production (see, for example, Morris et al. 1979). However, by in...
Chapter
Certain items of talk, for example demonstratives such as ‘this’ and ‘that’, have the property that “instead of being interpreted semantically in their own right, they make reference to something else for their interpretation” (Halliday and Hasan 1976:30). Halliday and Hasan (1976:31) note that such items “are directives indicating that information...
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DuncanStarkeyJr., & FiskeDonald W., Face-to-face interaction: Research, methods, and theory. Hilisdale, New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates (distributor Halsted (Wiley)), New York, 1977. Pp. 361. - Volume 8 Issue 2-3 - Charles Goodwin
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Pennsylvania, 1977. Includes bibliographical references (leaves 354-369). Microfilm of typescript. s

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Projects (3)
Project
As negation can be expressed verbally and non-verbally, it appears to be a a locus to look at the combination of all the semiotic resources speakers use to communicate and make meaning together.
Project
The vision of EarthCube is to revolutionize Earth Science investigations by promoting better data access, incorporating cyberinfrastructure into the scientific workflow, and facilitating increased sophistication of analyses and modeling. The ultimate goal of EarthCube is to accelerate the rate at which we do science and increase the scope of our scientific investigations. This specific project focuses on the field-based geosciences (i.e., those involved in investigating the natural world in situ through recording observations, taking samples, and collecting field data). We organized two field excursions to facilitate a dialogue between field-based geologists, and computer and cognitive scientists concerning the unique problems faced by the field-based geological community with respect to data format, standards, management, representation, and integration. We hope to break down the artificial barriers between subfields within the Earth Sciences, allowing us to ask new types of questions, and providing the means to contend with previously unanswerable ones.
Project
Framework for the analysis from an integrated perspective of human language, social organization, tool use, the accumulative diversity of languages, settings, cultures, interacting bodies, diagrammatic gesture, pedagogy, the mutual constitution of actors and their environments, shared experience, distributed utterances and actors, the construction of action by bringing diverse materials into arrangements where they mutually elaborate each other, etc.