Charles-Etienne Benoit

Charles-Etienne Benoit
Claude Bernard University Lyon 1 | UCBL

Doctor of Psychology
Associate professor at Lyon-1 University

About

26
Publications
8,310
Reads
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731
Citations
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - present
University of Economics and Human Sciences
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
February 2016 - January 2018
Université Catholique de Louvain - UCLouvain
Position
  • PostDoc Position
July 2013 - December 2015
Université de Montpellier
Position
  • Engineer

Publications

Publications (26)
Article
Studies investigating motor learning in patients with Multiple Sclerosis (MS) disease highlighted that MS patients exhibit similar learning performance than healthy controls, but that learning can be hampered by the progression of MS eventually leading to impaired efficiency of subcortical-cortical networks. We aimed at investigating whether the lo...
Article
Full-text available
It has been more than two years since our previous newsletter. Much has happened since and it is important to look back and write to you all about the major changes that occurred under the supervision of Dr. Konrad Janowski, the Editor-in-Chief of Advances in Cognitive Psychology (ACP).
Article
Abstract Objective As demonstrated in a pilot study, hypothyroidism has a highly stressful impact on some areas of functioning. This study aims to evaluate the connection between illness‐related beliefs (IRBs) and the impact of hypothyroidism on fertility and close relationships, which were the strongest stressors, and the level of depressive, anx...
Article
Full-text available
Fatigue is a frequent complaint among healthy population and one of the earliest and most debilitating symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD). Earlier studies have examined the role of dopamine and serotonin in pathogenesis of fatigue, but the plausible role of noradrenalin (NA) remains underexplored. We investigated the relationship between fatigue...
Article
Mentally demanding tasks feel effortful and are usually avoided. Furthermore, prolonged cognitive engagement leads to mental fatigue, consisting of subjective feeling of exhaustion and decline in performance. Despite the intuitive characterization of fatigue as an increase in subjective effort perception, the effect of fatigue on effort cost has ne...
Article
Perceptual and sensorimotor timing skills can be comprehensively assessed with the Battery for the Assessment of Auditory Sensorimotor and Timing Abilities (BAASTA). The battery has been used for testing rhythmic skills in healthy adults and patient populations (e.g., with Parkinson disease), showing sensitivity to timing and rhythm deficits. Here...
Preprint
Full-text available
Mentally demanding tasks feel effortful and are usually avoided. Furthermore, prolonged cognitive engagement leads to mental fatigue, consisting of subjective feeling of exhaustion and decline in performance. Despite the intuitive characterization of fatigue as an increase in subjective effort perception, the effect of fatigue on effort cost has ne...
Article
Full-text available
The Battery for the Assessment of Auditory Sensorimotor and Timing Abilities (BAASTA) is a new tool for the systematic assessment of perceptual and sensorimotor timing skills. It spans a broad range of timing skills aimed at differentiating individual timing profiles. BAASTA consists of sensitive time perception and production tasks. Perceptual tas...
Article
Motor synchronization to the beat of an auditory sequence (e.g., a metronome or music) is widespread in humans. However, some individuals show poor synchronization and impoverished beat perception. This condition, termed “beat deafness”, has been linked to a perceptual deficit in beat tracking. Here we present single-case evidence (L.A. and L.C.) t...
Article
Full-text available
Training based on rhythmic auditory stimulation (RAS) can improve gait in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (IPD). Patients typically walk faster and exhibit greater stride length after RAS. However, this effect is highly variable among patients, with some exhibiting little or no response to the intervention. These individual differences...
Conference Paper
Background Impairments of timing abilities are characteristic of different neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) or schizophrenia. They can also occur in healthy individuals suffering from beat deaf deafness. These deficits are expressed in the form of impoverished timed...
Article
Full-text available
Auditory stimulation via rhythmic cues can be used successfully in the rehabilitation of motor function in patients with motor disorders. A prototypical example is provided by dysfunctional gait in patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). Coupling steps to external rhythmic cues (the beat of music or the sounds of a metronome) leads to lo...
Article
Full-text available
It is well established that auditory cueing improves gait in patients with Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (IPD). Disease-related reductions in speed and step length can be improved by providing rhythmical auditory cues via a metronome or music. However, effects on cognitive aspects of motor control have yet to be thoroughly investigated. If synchro...
Article
Full-text available
Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that targets mainly dopaminergic neurons of the basal ganglia. PD is characterized by motor symptoms typically leading to dysfunctional gait. External rhythmic auditory cues have shown beneficial effects on gait kinematics in PD patients. These effects are likely to be mediated by a general-p...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
The beneficial effect of auditory cueing on gait performance in Parkinson's disease (PD) has been widely documented. Nevertheless, little is known about the neural underpinnings of this effect and the consequences of auditory cueing beyond improved gait kinematics. The therapy relies on processing the temporal regularity in an auditory signal to wh...
Data
Full-text available
a b s t r a c t Accumulated evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in emotional disorders by acting on Y 1 and Y 2 receptors. This hypothesis is based on animal studies carried out in naïve normal animals but not in animal models of depression, including the olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) rat. The OBX rat produces a wide array of sy...
Article
Accumulated evidence suggests that neuropeptide Y (NPY) is involved in emotional disorders by acting on Y(1) and Y(2) receptors. This hypothesis is based on animal studies carried out in naïve normal animals but not in animal models of depression, including the olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) rat. The OBX rat produces a wide array of symptoms that mi...
Article
The hippocampus is a crucial player across several learning and memory domains, and is highly vulnerable to alterations during aging. Several products of neurotransmitter genes and neuromodulator genes (which play important parts in mediating and maintaining cognitive ability as a function of age) are expressed in hippocampal formation. However, th...
Article
Full-text available
High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with deficits in learning and memory with age as well as in Alzheimer's disease. Using DNA microarray, we demonstrated the overexpression of quinone reductase 2 (QR2) in the hippocampus in two models of learning deficits, namely the aged memory impaired rats and the scopolamine-induced amn...

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