Chaona Chen

Chaona Chen
University of Glasgow | UofG · Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology

Ph.D. in Psychology

About

28
Publications
6,797
Reads
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153
Citations
Introduction
I am interested in using psychophysical methods and computer graphics to understand social signals in human-human and human-computer communication.
Additional affiliations
October 2017 - August 2018
University of Glasgow
Position
  • PostDoc Position
October 2014 - present
University of Glasgow
Position
  • Research Assistant
Description
  • (1) Introduction to MATLAB (for PhD, MSc, MRes students) (2) Research Methods (for MSc students)
October 2013 - present
University of Glasgow
Position
  • Tutor
Description
  • (1) Dealing with Interviews (for Level 4 students) (2) Statistics Workshop (for MSc, Level 3 and Level 4 students) (3) Lab Practical Course (for Level 1 students)
Education
October 2013 - October 2016
University of Glasgow
Field of study
  • Visual Cognition
September 2009 - June 2013
Wuhan University
Field of study
  • Psychology

Publications

Publications (28)
Article
Full-text available
Human facial expressions are complex, multi-component signals that can communicate rich information about emotions,1, 2, 3, 4, 5 including specific categories, such as “anger,” and broader dimensions, such as “negative valence, high arousal.”6, 7, 8 An enduring question is how this complex signaling is achieved. Communication theory predicts that m...
Preprint
One of the longest standing debates in the emotion sciences is whether emotions are represented as discrete categories such as happy or sad or as continuous fundamental dimensions such as valence and arousal. Theories of communication make specific predictions about the facial expression signals that would represent emotions as either discrete or d...
Preprint
Facial expressions support effective social communication by dynamically transmitting complex, multi-layered messages, such as emotion categories and their intensity. How facial expressions achieve this signalling task remains unknown. Here, we address this question by identifying the specific facial movements that convey two key components of emot...
Article
Full-text available
Real-world studies show that the facial expressions produced during pain and orgasm—two different and intense affective experiences—are virtually indistinguishable. However, this finding is counterintuitive, because facial expressions are widely considered to be a powerful tool for social interaction. Consequently, debate continues as to whether th...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Social robots are now part of human society, destined for schools, hospitals, and homes to perform a va- riety of tasks. To engage their human users, social robots must be equipped with the essential social skill of facial expression communication. Yet, even state-of-the-art social robots are limited in this ability because they often rely on a res...
Article
Full-text available
Understanding the cultural commonalities and specificities of facial expressions of emotion remains a central goal of Psychology. However, recent progress has been stayed by dichotomous debates (e.g., nature versus nurture) that have created silos of empirical and theoretical knowledge. Now, an emerging interdisciplinary scientific culture is broad...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
As a highly social species, humans regularly exchange sophisticated social signals to support everyday life and the functioning of wider society. One of the most important aspects of social interaction is communicating negative (i.e., pain) and positive (i.e., pleasure) internal states. Although pain and pleasure are diametrically opposite concepts...
Article
Full-text available
Visual categorization is the brain computation that reduces high-dimensional information in the visual environment into a smaller set of meaningful categories. An important problem in visual neuroscience is to identify the visual information that the brain must represent and then use to categorize visual inputs. Here we introduce a new mathematical...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
With the advent of the digital economy, increasing globalization and cultural integration, cross-cultural social communication is increasing, where the mutual understanding of mental states (e.g., confusion, bored) is a key social skill. One of the most powerful tools in social communication is the face, which can flexibly create a broad spectrum o...

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