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Chandra Dev Bhatta

Chandra Dev Bhatta
PBU, Nepal

Trained in some parts of अपरा विद्या

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27
Publications
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96
Citations

Publications

Publications (27)
Article
Full-text available
This article looks into the interface between politics, geopolitics, economy, and other factors vis-á-vis successful political and economic transitions in Nepal.
Article
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The debate on geopolitics has gained momentum at various layers of society in recent years. Yet, there is paucity in clarity as to what geopolitics entails and how Nepal has become geopolitically important. There are, however, multiple opinions, where the tendency has been to project geography as the main tenet of geopolitics. This may partially be...
Article
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Nepal’s post 1990s political discourse has witnessed many issues and the most important ones, among them, are also related to inclusion and exclusion. Both of them have taken the centre stage for their own reasons. Yet, the debate itself is not going toward the right direction and there is more than one reason for that. A closer look of the discour...
Article
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This paper attempts to understand the philosophical grounds for the concept of peace in Hinduism and how they have influenced Nepali society over the years. It also discusses the scope of religion in the recent peace-process of Nepal. It asks the question: Is the Hindu concept of peace compatible with the idea of peace that has been recently floate...
Article
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This article looks into the future of regional cooperation in South Asia in the light of two emerging powers: China and India focussing on how their rise would change the relationship in the region. The paper argues that China and India both are trying to enhance their spheres of influence forcing the states in the region to align with either of th...
Article
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p>The paper explores the state-civil society relations in Nepal, which have gone through many ups and downs from various perspectives. This is important for the reason that the two terms are now in the forefront of public debate: Rajya – the state and Nagarik Samaj – civil society. Voices, both in favour and against the state and civil society, are...
Chapter
Does the regime established on the basis of popular movement always contribute toward peacebuilding and strengthen the democratization process? If it does, what are the necessary ingredients for that? This chapter deals with the case of Nepal where frequent regime changes, by using so called popular movements, have paralysed the country. It appears...
Article
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This article deals with the role of external actors in the post-2006 state-building process in Nepal. Two issues have dominated the state-building narrative after 2006: the peace-process and the constitutional process. There has been a strong presence of international agencies. Both issues were later usurped by the external agencies and Nepal loses...
Article
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The main purpose of this paper is to provide information about Nepal's civil society as far as possible, as the same has become much contested in recent years. The article looks into the different traditions (from traditional to post-modern) of civil society in Nepal as an endeavour to take stock of where it stands vis-à-vis with various factors in...

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Projects (2)
Project
This is a book Chapter for a book called Political Economy of Development in Nepal published jointly by Tribhuvan University and Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Nepal Office. The main argument here is how foreign aid has developed an oligarchic culture in the course of aid administration in Nepal and developmental debate generated by various agencies who are working in this field. Neither the aid nor the developmental debate has been helpful to address Nepal's problem of underdevelopment. It has , by contrast, only promoted a layer of Globally Mobile Elites (GMEs).