Chad R. Farrell

Chad R. Farrell
University of Alaska Anchorage | UAA · Department of Sociology

Ph.D.

About

20
Publications
4,828
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
1,325
Citations
Introduction
Chad R. Farrell currently works at the Department of Sociology, University of Alaska Anchorage.
Additional affiliations
August 2005 - present
University of Alaska Anchorage
Position
  • Professor (Associate)

Publications

Publications (20)
Article
Full-text available
BACKGROUND Few studies have examined long-term changes in ethnoracial diversity for US states despite the potential social, economic, and political ramifications of such changes at the state level. OBJECTIVE We describe shifts in diversity magnitude and structure from 1980 through 2015 to determine if states are following a universal upward path. M...
Article
This study investigates immigrant suburbanisation trends over the past decade in the metropolitan USA, focusing on how suburbanisation affects the residential segregation of foreign-born populations. Using 2000–2012 data from the decennial census and American Community Survey, it tracks the suburban settlement patterns of 17 country-of-origin group...
Article
Full-text available
Although residential segregation is known to have declined for some racial groups in America, much less is known about change in the relative socioeconomic quality of the neighborhoods where different racial and ethnic groups live. Using census data for 1980–2010, we find that the neighborhoods where whites and minorities reside have become more al...
Chapter
See free ebook at: https://www.russellsage.org/publications/diversity-and-disparities
Chapter
Anchorage, Alaska embodies the demographic dynamism that is transforming the circumpolar region. The city sits on the traditional homelands of the Dena’ina Athabascan people and is increasingly a destination for immigrants and refugees, adding new dimensions to its rich cultural traditions. This chapter focuses on changing foreign-born populations,...
Article
The United States is experiencing a profound increase in racial and ethnic diversity, although its communities are experiencing the trend differently depending on their size and location. Using census data from 1980 to 2010, we focus on a subset of highly diverse local jurisdictions in which no ethnoracial group makes up more than half of the popul...
Article
Full-text available
Most quantitative studies of neighborhood racial change rely on census tracts as the unit of analysis. However, tracts are insensitive to variation in the geographic scale of the phenomenon under investigation and to proximity among a focal tract’s residents and those in nearby territory. Tracts may also align poorly with residents’ perceptions of...
Article
We investigate suburbanization and neighborhood inequality among 14 immigrant groups using census tract data from the 2008-2012 American Community Survey. Immigrant neighborhood inequality is defined here as the degree to which immigrants reside in neighborhoods that are poorer than the neighborhoods in which native whites reside. Using city and su...
Article
This study investigates the changing racial diversity and structure of metropolitan neighborhoods. We consider three alternative perspectives about localized racial change: that neighborhoods are bifurcating along a white/nonwhite color line, fragmenting into homogeneous enclaves, or integrating white, black, Latino, and Asian residents into divers...
Article
We use newly developed methods of measuring spatial segregation across a range of spatial scales to assess changes in racial residential segregation patterns in the 100 largest U.S. metropolitan areas from 1990 to 2000. Our results point to three notable trends in segregation from 1990 to 2000: (1) Hispanic-white and Asian-white segregation levels...
Article
The census tract—based residential segregation literature rests on problematic assumptions about geographic scale and proximity. We pursue a new tract-free approach that combines explicitly spatial concepts and methods to examine racial segregation across egocentric local environments of varying size. Using 2000 Census data for the 100 largest U.S....
Article
Full-text available
This article addresses an aspect of racial residential segregation that has been largely ignored in prior work: the issue of geographic scale. In some metropolitan areas, racial groups are segregated over large regions, with predominately white regions, predominately black regions, and so on, whereas in other areas, the separation of racial groups...
Article
Racial residential segregation remains a topic of interest due to its impact on broader racial stratification. However, scholarly inquiry into the subject often ignores metropolitan racial diversity and the hierarchical nature of urban space. This paper proposes a multigroup, multilevel framework to assess the shifting racial and geographical struc...
Article
The presence of homeless persons in or near residential areas has been characterized as a marker of encroaching urban disorder that undermines neighborhood quality and engenders fear among residents. Using data compiled from a national survey, the author tests these assumptions by assessing how residential exposure to homelessness influences domici...
Article
Using data from a national survey of public attitudes toward homeless people, this paper evaluates the applicability of the contact hypothesis to in-group/out-group relations that fail to meet the optimal conditions specified in the contact literature. Past efforts are extended by (1) moving beyond face-to-face encounters to consider multiple types...
Article
The authors use data from two national surveys to shed light on panhandling among homeless people and the public’s responses to it. A comparison of homeless panhandlers and nonpanhandlers shows the former group to be more isolated, troubled, and disadvantaged than the latter. Although only a minority of all homeless say that they panhandle, a major...
Article
The full text of the dissertation is available as a Adobe Acrobat .pdf file (239 p.) ; Adobe Acrobat Reader required to view the file. Mode of access: World Wide Web. Thesis (Ph.D.)--Pennsylvania State University, 2005.