Céline Arzel

Céline Arzel
University of Turku | UTU · Department of Biology

PhD

About

32
Publications
9,711
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
790
Citations
Citations since 2016
9 Research Items
457 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
2016201720182019202020212022020406080
Additional affiliations
December 2008 - present
University of Turku
Position
  • Researcher

Publications

Publications (32)
Preprint
Boreal surface waters have become browner over the past decades, defined as water browning or brownification. At the catchment and global scales, there is a need for long-term studies to investigate both minor and major, abiotic and biotic factors driving the browning of waters. Here, we studied the impact of both forestry practices and beaver acti...
Article
Full-text available
Water browning or brownification refers to increasing water color, often related to increasing dissolved organic matter (DOM) and carbon (DOC) content in freshwaters. Browning has been recognized as a significant physicochemical phenomenon altering boreal lakes, but our understanding of its ecological consequences in different freshwater habitats a...
Article
Stability of breeding habitat use and population variability was studied in two common wader species: green sandpiper Tringa ochropus and common sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos in a boreal lake area in southern Finland. The main natural driver of habitat disturbance in the area is an ecosystem engineer, the North American beaver Castor canadensis. We...
Article
Surface water browning affects boreal lakes in the Northern Hemisphere. This process is expected to increase with global warming. Boreal lakes are the most numerous lakes on Earth. These ecosystems are particularly sensitive to disturbances due to their low biodiversity compared to other aquatic environments. The recent darkening of surface water i...
Article
Full-text available
Here we investigate if lead may be a contributing factor to the observed population decline in a Baltic colony of incubating eiders (Somateria mollissima). Body mass and blood samples were obtained from 50 incubating female eiders at the Baltic breeding colony on Christiansø during spring 2017 (n = 27) and 2018 (n = 23). All the females were sample...
Article
Understanding drivers of variation and trends in biodiversity change is a general scientific challenge, but also crucial for conservation and management. Previous research shows that patterns of increase and decrease are not always consistent at different spatial scales, calling for approaches combining the latter. We here explore the idea that fun...
Article
Full-text available
In this article, we present the population trends of waterfowl breeding at Aasla (60°17’N/21°56’E), an island in the Archipelago Sea, southern Finland, in 1975–2015. A total of 49 648 breeding pairs were counted during the four-decade period. The peak in breeding pair numbers was recorded in the 1990s, mainly due to an increase in the Eider populat...
Article
Full-text available
Eurasian migratory duck species represent a natural resource shared between European countries. As is evident throughout human harvest history, lack of coordinated management and monitoring at appropriate levels often leads to 'the tragedy of the commons', where shared populations suffer overexploitation. Effective management can also be hampered b...
Article
Although ducks have long been popular research subjects in both North America and Europe, geographical divergences in research orientation have developed during the past several decades for studying foraging ecology. In North America, foraging studies largely focused on the population level with an emphasis on foraging energetics aimed at improving...
Article
Full-text available
Breeding habitats strongly influence duck reproduction and survival. The boreal biome harbours a large share of the world’s wetlands, which are important breeding sites for several duck species. Based on 98 studies in the peer-reviewed literature, we here synthesize and evaluate which habitat characteristics affect habitat use and reproduction of d...
Article
Land-use changes and the resulting habitat degradation have been regarded as the most important known causes of waterfowl population declines. We assessed the habitat requirements of waterbirds, including waterfowl, in a hemiboreal, agricultural watershed in southern Finland. We related the birds' species diversity, abundance and brood numbers on t...
Article
Full-text available
We studied time budgets and foraging methods in pre-breeding Mallard Anas platyrhynchos, (Eurasian) Teal Anas crecca, Wigeon Anas penelope, Pintail Anas acuta, Shoveler Anas clypeata and Gadwall Anas strepera in subarctic Norway in May. Among all six species studied, foraging accounted for the most common use of time, ranging from 19 % in male Pint...
Article
Full-text available
A particular aim of avian ecologists, especially those studying waterfowl Anatidae, in the 20th and early 21st centuries has been to elucidate how organisms use habitats and intrinsic resources to survive, reproduce and ultimately affect fitness. For much of the 20th century, research was mainly on studying species during the breeding season; howev...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial information and geographical information systems (GISs) are widely used in ecosystem service research, but both the information and the methods need to be properly understood in order to make coherent analyses. We discuss the practical challenges of incorporating spatial data to ecosystem service assessment in an agricultural landscape and...
Article
Full-text available
The capacity of migratory species to adapt to climate change may depend on their migratory and reproductive strategies. For example, reproductive output is likely to be influenced by how well migration and nesting are timed to temporal patterns of food abundance, or by temperature variations during the brood rearing phase. Based on two decades (198...
Article
Full-text available
Spring migration is a key part of the annual cycle for waterfowl populations in the northern hemisphere, due to its temporal proximity to the breeding season and because resources may be limited at one or more staging sites. Research based on field observations during spring lags behind other periods of the year, despite the potential for fitness c...
Article
Full-text available
The consequences of climate change for bird populations have received much attention in recent decades, especially amongst cavity-nesting songbirds, yet little has been written on ducks (Anatidae) despite these being major elements of wetland diversity and important quarry species. This paper reviews the major known consequences of climate change f...
Article
Full-text available
Density dependence (DD) is a central concept in population ecology and in the management of harvested populations. For example, DD underpins the idea of additive versus compensatory mortality and is a tenet in the paradigm of resource limitation and regulation. Yet the prevalence and importance of DD remains disputed in most organisms, including du...
Article
Full-text available
During the winter of 2003/04, we studied emigration rates of teal Anas crecca in two major wetlands: the Camargue (southern France) and the Loire estuary (western France). We derived local survival probabilities as a step in ultimately estimating emigration rates from individual mark-resighting (visual recaptures) history of birds fitted with nasal...
Article
Full-text available
Reproductive success in ducks is strongly influenced by predation on the breeding grounds. Ducklings are targeted by a range of terrestrial, aerial and aquatic predators, giving a strong selective advantage to individuals and broods that have effective ways to avoid predation. In experiments on naive mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) ducklings without a...
Article
Full-text available
Two frequent assumptions about the evolution of long-distance migration in birds are that they travel long distances annually to reach food-rich areas for breeding, and that they time their migratory journey to be at staging sites when the latter provide the best feeding conditions. These assumptions have rarely been properly tested, and there is n...
Article
Full-text available
Many dabbling ducks Anas spp. are largely granivorous, consuming a variety of seeds chiefly from aquatic plants. To assess the relative value and carrying capacity of wetlands for dabbling ducks, species-specific information about seed mass is needed, but it is still largely missing or scattered in the literature. By combining weights of seeds coll...
Article
The functional response, i.e. the change in per capita food intake rate per time unit with changed food availability, is a widely used tool for understanding the ecology and behaviour of animals. However, waterfowl remain poorly explored in this context. In an aviary experiment we derived a functional response curve for teal (Anas crecca) foraging...
Article
The trade-off foragers make between predation risk and feeding efficiency is readily studied in dabbling ducks, which have stereotyped feeding methods, some of which prevent predator detection while others do not. Teals forage mostly with only the bill submerged (eyes above the water surface) in winter, but use a broader foraging repertoire in summ...
Article
Full-text available
Mate guarding by males is common in species with long-lasting pair bonds. We tested if the need to guard females affected foraging depth in male teal (Anas crecca), and if they were more vigilant than females when foraging with submerged eyes (preventing monitoring of competing males and predators). These predictions were not supported, suggesting...
Article
Full-text available
Capsule: Nasal saddles have no negative consequences apart from, under some circumstances, a potential bias in social relationships. Aims: To test the effect of nasal saddles on Teal Anas crecca, Wigeon A. penelope, Mallard A. platyrhynchos and Pintail A. acuta. Methods: The following features were compared between saddled and unsaddled individuals...
Article
Full-text available
Time–activity budgets in the family Anatidae are available for the wintering and breeding periods. We present the first flyway-level study of foraging time in a long-distance migrant, the Eurasian Green-winged Teal, Anas crecca crecca L., 1758 (“Teal”). Behavioral data from early and late spring staging, breeding, and molting sites were collected w...
Article
Full-text available
The policy of the European Commission prohibits hunting of migratory birds while they travel to their breeding grounds. To date, spring migration dates of ducks have mainly been determined using bird counts, but the validity of this sometimes disputed method has never been tested. We used ring-recovery data from close to 9,000 teal Anas crecca ring...
Article
Full-text available
Spring migration is generally considered as a crucial period of the year for many birds, not the least due to its supposed importance for subsequent breeding success. By reviewing the existing literature for Anatidae (ducks, geese, and swans), we show that little is known about their ecology in spring, although some goose species are exceptions. An...
Article
Full-text available
Pikeperch (Sander lucioperca L.) is a broadly distributed fish species in Europe but little is known about its ecology in the southern part of its distribution area in warm climatic conditions. The aim of this study was to analyse pikeperch rate of movement and to assess whether it displayed a diel pattern related to temperature. Thus acoustic tele...
Article
Dabbling ducks were studied on a eutrophic mid-flyway staging site in spring. Six species made up a temporary guild, in order of decreasing abundance they were: Teal (Anas crecca), Shoveler (A. clypeata), Mallard (A. platyrhynchos), Wigeon (A. penelope), Pintail (A. acuta), and Garganey (A. querquedula). Species richness and total abundance peaked...

Network

Cited By

Projects

Projects (6)
Project
POOL gathers the expertise of a multidisciplinary team of researchers, artists and stakeholders to provide in depth knowledge and raise awareness on deficiently known seasonal wetlands in boreal forest ecosystems. POOL will bring missing knowledge about the role of seasonal wetlands for biodiversity and functioning of boreal forest ecosystems. Then, POOL will propose solutions to raise efficiency of natural management of forestry companies and wetland conservation.
Project
Several migratory waterbird populations have dramatically declined worldwide. In parallel, the proportion of females has considerably decreased in these populations. Increasing predation of incubating females has been put forward to explain such declines. However, the range of species affected by sex ratio bias towards males and the spatial scale of the processes suggest that other factors are involved. The DISRUPT project, with support from the Academy of Finland (Academy research Fellow grant), will assess the role of pollutants in these declines. We are primarily focusing on the common Eider Somateria mollissima and the Common Goldeneye Bucephala clangula. Increased number of egg failure have been reported in both species. This project is carried out in collaboration with Aarhus university and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. DISRUPT aims at unravelling the value of waterbirds as model organisms of surface water contamination by EDCs at flyway scale in order to provide a tool to policy makers to monitor pollution and follow effects of mitigation measures to reduce contamination levels.
Project
We are investigating the reason behind the high number of failed hatchling (unhatched eggs and dead ducklings) in the Common Eider colony of Bengtskär, Finland.