Celina Dubin

Celina Dubin
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai | MSSM · Department of Dermatology

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17
Publications
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186
Citations

Publications

Publications (17)
Article
Background In the SARS-CoV-2/COVID-19 pandemic, we need to understand the impact of immunomodulatory medications on COVID-19 symptom severity in patients with inflammatory diseases, including the Type 2/Th2 polarized skin disease, atopic dermatitis/AD. Objective Since it is believed that Type 1/Th1immunity controls viral infections, and that there...
Article
Introduction Atopic dermatitis (AD) is the most common inflammatory skin disease. It has a complex pathophysiology, with a combination of immune dysregulation and intrinsic barrier defects driving cutaneous inflammation and allergic symptomatology. The IL-4, IL-13, and IL-31 inflammatory pathways have been identified as hallmark features in the pat...
Article
Background Atopic dermatitis/AD is a common disease, with particularly high prevalence seen in Africa. It is increasingly recognized that AD patients of different ethnic backgrounds have unique molecular signatures in skin, potentially accounting for treatment response variations. However, the skin profile of AD patients from Africa is unknown, hin...
Article
Background Frontal fibrosing alopecia/FFA is a progressive, scarring alopecia of the frontotemporal scalp, and poses a substantial burden on quality of life. Largescale global profiling of FFA is lacking, preventing the development of effective therapeutics. Objective To characterize FFA compared to normal and alopecia areata/AA using broad molecu...
Article
Background Alopecia areata (AA) is characterized by immunedysregulation in both scalp and blood, but a largescale approach establishing biomarkersof AA incorporating both scalp tissue and serum compartments is lacking. We aimed to characterize thetranscriptomicsignature of AA lesional and nonlesional scalp compared to healthy scalp and determine it...
Article
Full-text available
Dubin C, Del Duca E, Guttman-Yassky E. Ther Clin Risk Manag. 2020;16:1319– 1332. The authors have advised the drug, ARQ-252, was misnamed in the paper as roflumilast (which is called ARQ-151 and ARQ-154 by the manufacturer). The drug named ARQ-252 by the manufacturer should instead be classified as a JAK1 inhibitor in the paper. On page 1320, CHE T...
Article
Full-text available
Celina Dubin,1 Ester Del Duca,1,2 Emma Guttman-Yassky1,3 1Department of Dermatology, Laboratory of Inflammatory Skin Diseases, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA; 2Department of Dermatology, University of Magna Graecia, Catanzaro, Italy; 3Laboratory for Investigative Dermatology, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY, USA...
Article
Context: Skin sensitivity may be best defined as self-reported intolerance to application of skincare products. It is commonly believed that individuals with darker skin are generally less sensitive, while those lighter skin are more sensitive. However, there is little objective data correlating sensitivity with skin type or with objective measures...
Article
Background Although there is increased understanding of the alopecia areata/AA pathogenesis based on studies in scalp tissues, little is known about its systemic profile. Objective To evaluate the blood proteomic signature of AA and determine biomarkers associated with increased disease severity. Methods In a cross-sectional study, we assessed 35...
Article
Full-text available
This is the first study that objectively compares the molecular cutaneous improvement with different treatments in AD and may facilitate personalized medicine by identifying the best treatments for individual phenotypes, based on immune/barrier profiles.
Article
Background: Moderate-to-severe atopic dermatitis (AD) has been associated with significant disease burden and systemic abnormalities and often requires systemic treatments. Currently, safe and effective oral systemic treatments for moderate-to-severe AD are not yet available. ASN002 is an oral inhibitor of the Janus kinase/spleen tyrosine kinase s...

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