Cédric Scherer

Cédric Scherer
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research · Department of Ecological Dynamics

Dr. rer. nat. in Ecology

About

22
Publications
7,591
Reads
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235
Citations
Citations since 2016
18 Research Items
234 Citations
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Introduction
I use statistical and mechanistic simulation models to answer questions related to the movement ecology of animals and the dynamics of populations, communities, and diseases in space and time.
Additional affiliations
April 2019 - present
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research
Position
  • PostDoc Position
September 2017 - October 2017
University of California, Berkeley
Position
  • Visiting Scholar
October 2015 - March 2019
Leibniz Institute for Zoo and Wildlife Research
Position
  • PhD Student
Education
October 2011 - September 2014
Universität Potsdam
Field of study
  • Ecology, Evolution & Nature Conservation
October 2008 - September 2011
Universität Potsdam
Field of study
  • Life Sciences

Publications

Publications (22)
Article
Full-text available
1. Neutral landscape models (NLMs) simulate landscape patterns based on theoretical distributions and can be used to systematically study the effect of landscape structure on ecological processes. NLMs are commonly used in landscape ecology to enhance the findings of field studies as well as in simulation studies to provide an underlying landscape....
Article
Full-text available
Ecosystems respond in various ways to disturbances. Quantifying ecological stability therefore requires inspecting multiple stability properties, such as resistance, recovery, persistence and invariability. Correlations among these properties can reduce the dimensionality of stability, simplifying the study of environmental effects on ecosystems. A...
Article
Understanding host–pathogen dynamics requires realistic consideration of transmission events that, in the case of directly transmitted pathogens, result from contacts between susceptible and infected individuals. The corresponding contact rates are usually heterogeneous due to variation in individual movement patterns and the underlying landscape s...
Article
1.Understanding the drivers underlying disease dynamics is still a major challenge in disease ecology, especially in the case of long‐term disease persistence. Even though there is a strong consensus that density‐dependent factors play an important role for the spread of diseases, the main drivers are still discussed and, more importantly, might di...
Preprint
Full-text available
Organismal movement is ubiquitous and facilitates important ecological mechanisms that drive community and metacommunity composition and hence biodiversity. In most existing ecological theories and models in biodiversity research, movement is represented simplistically, ignoring the behavioural basis of movement and consequently the variation in be...
Article
Full-text available
Large numbers of bats are killed at wind turbines worldwide. To formulate mitigation measures such as curtailment, recent approaches relate the acoustic activity of bats around reference turbines to casualties to extrapolate fatality rates at turbines where only acoustic surveys are conducted. Here, we modeled how sensitive this approach is when sp...
Article
Full-text available
The ubiquitous use of computational work for data generation, processing, and modeling increased the importance of digital documentation in improving research quality and impact. Computational notebooks are files that contain descriptive text, as well as code and its outputs, in a single, dynamic, and visually appealing file that is easier to under...
Preprint
Full-text available
In the last years, the emergence of zoonotic diseases and the frequency of disease outbreaks have increased substantially, fuelled by habitat encroachment and asynchrony of biological cycles due to global change. The virulence of these diseases is a key aspect for their success. In order to understand the complex processes of pathogen virulence evo...
Chapter
Individual-based models (IBMs, also known as agent-based models) are mechanistic models in which demographic population trends emerge from processes at the individual level. IBMs are used instead of more aggregated approaches whenever one or more of the following aspects are deemed too relevant to be ignored: intraspecific trait variation, local in...
Article
Full-text available
Social networks are considered to be ‘highly modular’ when individuals within one module are more connected to each other than they are to individuals in other modules. It is currently unclear how highly modular social networks influence the persistence of contagious pathogens that generate lifelong immunity in their hosts when between‐group intera...
Preprint
Full-text available
Northern Bald Ibis (NBI) have disappeared from Europe already in Middle Age. Since 2003 a migratory population is reintroduced in Central Europe. We conducted demographic analyses of survival and reproduction of 384 NBI over a period of 12 years (2008-2019). These data also formed the basis for a population viability analysis (PVA) simulating the p...
Article
Full-text available
Global change is shifting the timing of biological events, leading to temporal mis-matches between biological events and resource availability. These temporal mis-matches can threaten species' populations. Importantly, temporal mismatches not only exert strong pressures on the population dynamics of the focal species, but can also lead to substanti...
Article
How the size of female yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) affects their spawning capability and fecundity is still an open and unresolved question due to the difficulties in investigating these complex effects in highly migratory pelagic marine fish species. However, this information is key to understanding the reproductive potential and resilience...
Article
Full-text available
Organismal movement is ubiquitous and facilitates important ecological mechanisms that drive community and meta-community composition and hence biodiversity. In most existing ecological theories and models in biodiversity research, movement is represented simplistically, ignoring the behavioural basis of movement and consequently the variation in b...
Article
Full-text available
The recent advancement of agent-based modeling is characterized by higher demands on the pa-rameterization, evaluation and documentation of these computationally expensive models. Accordingly, there is also a growing request for "easy to go" applications just mimicking the input-output behavior of such models. Metamodels are being increasingly used...
Thesis
Full-text available
Movement plays a major role in shaping population densities and contact rates among individuals, two factors that are particularly relevant for disease outbreaks. Although any differences in movement behaviour due to individual characteristics of the host and heterogeneity in landscape structure are likely to have considerable consequences for dise...
Poster
NLMR is an R package for simulating neutral landscape models (NLM). NLM range from ”hard” neutral models (only random functions) to ”soft” ones (with several parameters) and generate landscape patterns that reflect selected features of real landscapes. Thus, these patterns can be used as null models in landscape ecology. The NLMR package was design...
Poster
Full-text available
A major challenge in disease ecology is to understand what influences disease persistence. Host movement and thus individual movement decisions play an important role in driving on-going disease dynamics by transmitting pathogens to distant hosts. However, which movement mechanism influences the probability of disease persistence under which patter...
Poster
Full-text available
Click beetle larvae of the genus Agriotes (Coleoptera: Elateridae) are dominant generalist root herbivores in European grasslands and an important pest of a wide variety of crops. The damaging phases depend on soil temperature and soil moisture. As a result of unfavorable conditions in the upper soil layers (e.g. drought or frost) the mobile larvae...
Presentation
Full-text available
Understanding the underlying processes in occurrence, abundance and diversity of species is important to predict future patterns of species diversity in changing environments. In arid and semi-arid savannas, heavy land use impacts and changes in climate substantially affect habitat composition. In particular, pristine savannas areas dominated by gr...
Poster
Full-text available
Monitoring animal behaviour in dynamic environments such as agricultural landscapes is crucial to understand impacts of current farming practices such as time of mowing, harvest or use of pesticides, and land use changes such as homogenisation of arable crops or energy crops. Continuous recording of animal movement behaviour is challenging since ma...

Network

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Projects

Projects (3)
Project
In the AFT model, a generic individual-based and spatially-explicit population model, traits are reduced to two axes of variation that capture a large proportion of the original variation: (i) body mass, which is strongly related to life-history traits (i. e. reproductive output, mortality rate and longevity: Peters 1968; Prinzinger 1993) and spatial scales (i. e. home range area and dispersal abilities: Sutherland et al. 2000; Haskell et al. 2002; Ottaviani et al. 2006) and (ii) the use of vegetation structures (i. e. required structures for nest sites and preferred habitat). Birds are good candidates for investigating how structural changes might alter the occurrence of species and ecosystem functioning, because they occur at various levels of the food chain and the ecology is well known (Hausner et al. 2003). Since responses of birds could depend on shrub patterns in a more complex way, the use of individual-based and spatially-explicit model is appro¬priate because more complex models provide the ability to predict the future behavior of systems (Eevans et al. 2013). By explicitly considering spatial interactions between heterogeneity in habitat quality and demographic processes, a more direct assessment of expected population response to land use and climate changes is possible (Del Barrio et al. 2006). To investigate which traits, trait combinations and trade-offs make a functional type sensitive to modifications in habitat structure due to land use and / or climate changes, I tested artificial landscape scenarios varying in the intensity of shrub encroachment (shrub–grass ratios). Furthermore, I varied the fragmentation level (clumping intensity of shrubs) to test if spatial composition of habitat has an effect on the persistence of different functional types.
Project
BioMove RTG links innovative individual research projects that overcome the gap between movement ecology and biodiversity research, employing a joint conceptual framework. We investigate how ongoing changes in climate and land use, such as habitat loss and fragmentation through agricultural practises, influence movement processes of various organisms and thereby biodiversity patterns. www.biomove.org