Cecilia Sánchez

Cecilia Sánchez
EcoHealth Alliance

Doctor of Philosophy

About

23
Publications
2,309
Reads
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362
Citations
Citations since 2017
16 Research Items
362 Citations
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
2017201820192020202120222023020406080100120
Education
August 2014 - December 2019
University of Georgia
Field of study
  • Ecology
August 2009 - May 2013
Yale University
Field of study
  • Biology

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Anthropogenic landscape modification such as urbanization can expose wildlife to toxicants, with profound behavioural and health effects. Toxicant exposure can alter the local transmission of wildlife diseases by reducing survival or altering immune defence. However, predicting the impacts of pathogens on wildlife across their ranges is complicated...
Article
Full-text available
Urban rats are widely distributed pests that have negative effects on public health and property. It is crucial to understand their distribution to inform control efforts and address drivers of rat presence. Analysing public rat complaints can help assess urban rat distribution and identify factors supporting rat populations. Both social and enviro...
Article
Anticoagulant rodenticides (ARs) deployed to control rodent pest populations can increase the risk of pathogen infection for some wildlife. However, it is unknown whether ARs also increase infection risk for target rodents, which are common hosts for zoonotic (animal-to-human transmitted) pathogens. In this study, we tested whether rats exposed to...
Article
Urban-living wildlife can be exposed to metal contaminants dispersed into the environment through industrial, residential, and agricultural applications. Metal exposure carries lethal and sublethal consequences for animals; in particular, heavy metals (e.g. arsenic, lead, mercury) can damage organs and act as carcinogens. Many bat species reside an...
Article
Full-text available
Emerging diseases caused by coronaviruses of likely bat origin (e.g., SARS, MERS, SADS, COVID-19) have disrupted global health and economies for two decades. Evidence suggests that some bat SARS-related coronaviruses (SARSr-CoVs) could infect people directly, and that their spillover is more frequent than previously recognized. Each zoonotic spillo...
Preprint
Full-text available
Emerging diseases caused by coronaviruses of likely bat origin (e.g. SARS, MERS, SADS and COVID-19) have disrupted global health and economies for two decades. Evidence suggests that some bat SARS-related coronaviruses (SARSr-CoVs) could infect people directly, and that their spillover is more frequent than previously recognized. Each zoonotic spil...
Article
Full-text available
Zoonotic spillover and subsequent disease emergence cause significant, long-lasting impacts on our social, economic, environmental and political systems. Identifying and averting spillover transmission is crucial for preventing outbreaks and mitigating infectious disease burdens. Investigating the processes that lead to spillover fundamentally invo...
Article
Many parasites have external transmission stages that persist in the environment prior to infecting a new host. Understanding how long these stages can persist, and how abiotic conditions such as temperature affect parasite persistence, is important for predicting infection dynamics and parasite responses to future environmental change. In this stu...
Article
Full-text available
Bats are reservoirs of emerging viruses that are highly pathogenic to other mammals, including humans. Despite the diversity and abundance of bat viruses, to date they have not been shown to harbor exogenous retroviruses. Here we report the discovery and characterization of a group of koala retrovirus-related (KoRV-related) gammaretroviruses in Aus...
Article
Urban development can alter resource availability, land use, and community composition, which, in turn, influences wildlife health. Generalizable relationships between wildlife health and urbanization have yet to be quantified and could vary across different measures of health and among species. We present a phylogenetic meta‐analysis of 516 compar...
Article
The spectacled flying fox ( Pteropus conspicillatus) is listed as vulnerable to extinction in Australia. The species' restricted population is in decline, putatively attributed to decreasing habitat, climatic extremes, anthropogenic activities, and more recently, mass mortality events associated with tick paralysis and neonatal cleft palate syndrom...
Article
Full-text available
Body condition metrics are widely used to infer animal health and to assess costs of parasite infection. Since parasites harm their hosts, ecologists might expect negative relationships between infection and condition in wildlife, but this assumption is challenged by studies showing positive or null condition–infection relationships. Here, we outli...
Article
Old World fruit bats (Chiroptera: Pteropodidae) provide critical pollination and seed dispersal services to forest ecosystems across Africa, Asia, and Australia. In each of these regions, pteropodids have been identified as natural reservoir hosts for henipaviruses. The genus Henipavirus includes Hendra virus and Nipah virus, which regularly spill...
Article
Full-text available
Interactions with flying foxes pose disease transmission risks to volunteer rehabilitators (carers) who treat injured, ill, and orphaned bats. In particular, Australian bat lyssavirus (ABLV) can be transmitted directly from flying foxes to humans in Australia. Personal protective equipment (PPE) and rabies vaccination can be used to protect against...
Data
Survey data. Responses to the survey from 122 Australian flying fox rehabilitators. Data were de-identified by removing the following information: gender, age, education level, state of residence, years of experience, and wildlife care organisation. (CSV)
Data
Wildlife and flying fox organisations contacted. (DOCX)
Data
Risk to human health rated by 118 Australian flying fox rehabilitators, 2014: %a and (n). Rehabilitators assigned risk ratings to multiple hypothetical scenarios involving a flying fox. (DOCX)
Data
Results of a binary logistic regression to identify predictors of being bitten or scratched. Values are reported for β (beta) coefficient, SE (standard error), OR (odds ratio) and 95% CI (confidence interval). PPE, personal protective equipment; Threat, whether a carer considers viruses in flying foxes to be a threat to carer health. “Any form” of...
Data
SOAR: Survey Of Australian flying fox Rehabilitators. (PDF)
Data
Results of a binary logistic regression to identify predictors of not being bitten or scratched. Values are reported for β (beta) coefficient, SE (standard error), OR (odds ratio) and 95% CI (confidence interval). PPE, personal protective equipment; Threat, whether a carer considers viruses in flying foxes to be a threat to carer health. Model AUC...

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