Cécile Sarabian

Cécile Sarabian
The University of Hong Kong | HKU · School of Biological Sciences

PhD

About

19
Publications
2,124
Reads
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179
Citations
Introduction
Postdoctoral researcher in Cognitive Ecology investigating parasite avoidance behaviors and their effectiveness in non-human primates and other animals via field and lab experimentation/observations. Generally interested in the origins of hygiene and disgust in humans and in the potential applications of disgust into the field of Conservation.
Additional affiliations
September 2019 - November 2021
Kyoto University
Position
  • PostDoc Position

Publications

Publications (19)
Article
Full-text available
Parasites are ubiquitous in nature and can be costly to animal fitness, so hosts have evolved behavioural counter-strategies to mitigate infection risk. We investigated feeding-related infection-Avoidance strategies in Japanese macaques via field-experimentation and observation. We first examined risk sensitivity during foraging tasks involving fae...
Article
Full-text available
Avoiding biological contaminants is a well-known manifestation of the adaptive system of disgust. In theory, animals evolved with such a system to prevent pathogen and parasite infection. Bodily products are human-universal disgust elicitors, but whether they also elicit avoidance behaviour in non-human primates has yet to be tested. Here, we repor...
Article
Full-text available
Threats from parasites and pathogens are ubiquitous, and many use pathways that exploit host trophic interactions for their transmission. As such, host organisms have evolved a behavioural immune system to facilitate contamination-risk assessment and avoidance of potential contaminants in various contexts, including feeding. Detecting pathogen thre...
Article
Full-text available
Intense selection pressure from parasites on free-living animals has resulted in behavioral adaptations that help potential hosts avoid sources of infection. In primates, such “behavioral immunity” is expressed in different contexts and may vary according to the ecology of the host, the nature of the infectious agent, and the individual itself. In...
Article
Full-text available
All free-living animals are subject to intense selection pressure from parasites and pathogens resulting in behavioural adaptations that can help potential hosts to avoid falling prey to parasites. This special issue on the evolution of parasite avoidance behaviour was compiled following a Royal Society meeting in 2017. Here we have assembled contr...
Article
Full-text available
Historically, Internet access has been linked to a country’s wealth. However, starting a decade ago, this situation changed dramatically and Internet access became increasingly available in primate range countries. The rapid growth of smartphone use in developing nations has created new avenues to communicate conservation. Here we assess the potent...
Article
Full-text available
Parasites constitute a major selective pressure which has shaped animal behaviour through evolutionary time. One adaption to parasites consists of recognizing and avoiding substrates or cues that indicate their presence. Among substrates harbouring infectious agents, faeces are known to elicit avoidance behaviour in numerous animal species. However...
Poster
Full-text available
New framework linking the adaptive system of disgust to conservation issues by focusing on eco-tourism and human-wildlife conflict
Thesis
Full-text available
Threats from parasites are ubiquitous. Infectious agents come in myriad forms and often use transmission pathways that exploit host trophic interactions. Because they can have serious fitness impacts on those they infect, host organisms have evolved a behavioral immune system to facilitate contamination-risk assessment and avoidance of sources of i...
Article
Full-text available
Animals have evolved a wide range of behaviours that act as barriers to decrease the risk of parasite infection. Faecal avoidance may, for example, limit contact with orofaecally transmitted parasites, such as gastrointestinal nematodes. When present in faeces, however, nematode eggs need to mature before reaching their infective stage. If strategi...
Article
Social structure can theoretically regulate disease risk by mediating exposure to pathogens via social proximity and contact. Investigating the role of central individuals within a network may help predict infectious agent transmission as well as implement disease control strategies, but little is known about such dynamics in real primate networks....

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Projects

Project (1)
Project
With this project, we aim to deepen our current understanding of how the adaptive system of disgust works in non-human primates, using cutting-edge technologies to assess the physiological responses which may accompany the behavioral responses to pathogenic cues. More precisely, this project aims to address the following: 1. whether different sensory cues (visual, olfactory, auditory, tactile) affect chimpanzees’ performance in a simple cognitive task; and 2. whether chimpanzees express similar physiological responses to pathogenic sensory cues as humans.