Cecile B. Menard

Cecile B. Menard
The University of Edinburgh | UoE

PhD.

About

30
Publications
8,861
Reads
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3,111
Citations
Introduction
Research interests: - Human errors in geoscientific modelling - Reducing uncertainty in snow models
Additional affiliations
May 2017 - present
The University of Edinburgh
Position
  • Research Associate
March 2016 - December 2017
CORES Science and Engineering
Position
  • Researcher
March 2012 - September 2015
Finnish Meteorological Institute
Position
  • Researcher
Education
October 2006 - April 2010
The University of Edinburgh
Field of study
  • Hydrometeorology
October 2003 - June 2006
University of Sussex
Field of study
  • Geography and Environmental Sciences

Publications

Publications (30)
Preprint
The European Space Agency SnowSAR instrument is a side looking, dual polarized (VV/VH), X/Ku band synthetic aperture radar (SAR), operable from a small aircraft. Between 2010 and 2013, the instrument was deployed at several sites in Northern Finland, Austrian Alps, and northern Canada. The purpose of the airborne campaigns was to measure the backsc...
Article
Within the framework of European Space Agency (ESA) activities, several campaigns were carried out in the last decade with the purpose of exploiting the capabilities of multifrequency synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data to retrieve snow information. This article presents the results obtained from the ESA SnowSAR airborne campaigns, carried out betw...
Article
Full-text available
The 30-year simulations of seasonal snow cover in 22 physically based models driven with bias-corrected meteorological reanalyses are examined at four sites with long records of snow observations. Annual snow cover durations differ widely between models, but interannual variations are strongly correlated because of the common driving data. No signi...
Article
Full-text available
Twenty-seven models participated in the Earth System Model - Snow Model Intercomparison Project (ESM-SnowMIP), the most data-rich MIP dedicated to snow modelling. Our findings do not support the hypothesis advanced by previous snow MIPs: evaluating models against more variables, and providing evaluation datasets extended temporally and spatially do...
Preprint
Full-text available
Thirty-year simulations of seasonal snow cover in 22 physically based models driven with bias-corrected meteorological reanalyses are examined at four sites with long records of snow observations. Annual snow cover durations differ widely between models but interannual variations are strongly correlated because of the common driving data. No signif...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes in situ meteorological forcing and evaluation data, and bias-corrected reanalysis forcing data, for cold regions' modelling at 10 sites. The long-term datasets (one maritime, one arctic, three boreal, and five mid-latitude alpine) are the reference sites chosen for evaluating models participating in the Earth System Model-Snow...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes in situ meteorological forcing and evaluation data, and bias-corrected reanalysis forcing data, for cold regions modelling at ten sites. The long-term datasets (one maritime, one arctic, three boreal and five mid-latitude alpine) are the reference sites chosen for evaluating models participating in the Earth System Model-Snow M...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes ESM-SnowMIP, an international coordinated modelling effort to evaluate current snow schemes, including snow schemes that are included in Earth system models, in a wide variety of settings against local and global observations. The project aims to identify crucial processes and characteristics that need to be improved in snow mo...
Article
Full-text available
This paper describes ESM-SnowMIP, an international coordinated modelling effort to evaluate current snow schemes against local and global observations in a wide variety of settings, including snow schemes that are included in Earth System Models. The project aims at identifying crucial processes and snow characteristics that need to be improved in...
Article
Full-text available
Previous studies have shown that climate warming is causing shrub cover to increase at high latitudes. Increased shrub cover generally lowers surface albedo, which results in higher energy absorption and further warming. In parts of Fennoscandia herbivory is known to control vegetation height and density, thus preventing this positive feedback. Her...
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Full-text available
Datasets derived from measurements at Sodankylä, Finland, for driving and evaluating snow models are presented. This is the first time that such complete datasets have been made available for a site in the Arctic. The continuous October 2007–September 2014 driving data comprise all of the meteorological variables required as inputs for physically b...
Article
Full-text available
Datasets derived from measurements at Sodankylä in the Finnish Arctic that can be used for driving and evaluating snow models are presented. The driving datasets comprise all of the meteorological variables required as inputs for physically-based snow models at hourly intervals: incoming solar and longwave radiation, snowfall and rainfall rates, ai...
Article
Full-text available
A single-model sixteen-member ensemble is used to investigate how external model factors can affect model performance. Ensemble members are constructed with the land surface model (LSM) JULES and different choices of meteorological forcing (in situ, NCEP CFSR/CFSv2 or WFDEI) and ancillary datasets (in situ or remotely sensed), and four timestep mod...
Article
Full-text available
Four satellite-based snow products are evaluated over the Tibetan Plateau for the 2007-2010 snow seasons. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra and Aqua snow cover daily L3 Global 500 m grid products (MOD10A1 and MYD10A1), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mappi...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies show that shrubs are colonizing higher latitudes and altitudes in the Arctic. Shrubs affect the wind transport, accumulation and melt of snow, but there have been few sensitivity studies of how shrub expansion might affect snowmelt rates and timing. Here, a three-source energy balance model (3SOM), which calculates vertical and horiz...
Article
At high latitudes, the albedo and energy budget of shrub-tundra landscapes is determined by the relationship between the fractional snow cover and the fraction of vegetation protruding above the snowpack. The exposed vegetation fraction is affected by the bending and/or burial of shrubs inwinter and their spring-up duringmelt. Little is known about...
Article
Full-text available
Recent studies show that shrubs are colonizing higher latitudes and altitudes in the Arctic. Shrubs affect the wind transport, accumulation and melt of snow, but there have been few sensitivity studies of how shrub expansion might affect snowmelt rates and timing. Here, a blowing snow transport and sublimation model is used to simulate premelt snow...
Article
There are many models that attempt to predict physical processes in snow on the ground for a range of applications, and evaluations of these models show that they have a wide range of behaviours. A review of snow models, however, shows that many of them draw on a relatively small number of process parameterizations combined in different configurati...
Article
THIS IS NOT AN ARTICLE BUT AN ABSTRACT FOR THE EGU. The interactions between shrubs, snow and soil are at the core of feedback loops affecting the water, energy and carbon budget at high latitude. Many studies, providing evidence from plot scale measurements to pan-Arctic satellite observations, have shown that shrubs are colonizing higher grounds,...
Article
Full-text available
Shrubs currently cover approximately 25% of the pan-Arctic. Increasing evidence from field observations, remotely sensed data and models suggests that the recent climate warming is leading to a ``greening'' of the Arctic that can mainly be attributed to the densification and expansion of shrub patches at high latitude. The relationship between shru...
Article
Full-text available
Recent research using repeat photography, long-term ecological monitoring and dendrochronology has documented shrub expansion in arctic, high-latitude and alpine tundra ecosystems. Here, we (1) synthesize these findings, (2) present a conceptual framework that identifies mechanisms and constraints on shrub increase, (3) explore causes, feedbacks an...
Article
Full-text available
This manuscript describes the energy and water components of a new community land surface model called the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES). This is developed from the Met Office Surface Exchange Scheme (MOSES). It can be used as a stand alone land surface model driven by observed forcing data, or coupled to an atmospheric global circula...
Article
Full-text available
This manuscript describes the energy and water components of a new community land surface model called the Joint UK Land Environment Simulator (JULES). This is developed from the Met Office Surface Exchange Scheme (MOSES). It can be used as a stand alone land surface model driven by observed forcing data, or coupled to an atmospheric global circula...
Article
Observational and modelling studies show that the warming of the Arctic is leading to shrub expansion. This shift in vegetation cover is expected to significantly alter the distribution of snow across the landscape and the interactions between the land surface and the atmosphere. Shrubs capture wind-blown snow, increasing snow depth and decreasing...
Article
Full-text available
Measurements of snowmelt and turbulent heat fluxes were made during the snowmelt periods of two years at two neighbouring tundra sites in the Yukon, one in a sheltered location with tall shrubs exposed above deep snow and the other in an exposed location with dwarf shrubs covered by shallow snow. The snow was about twice as deep in the valley as on...
Article
Full-text available
Measurements of snowmelt and turbulent heat fluxes were made during the snowmelt periods of two years at two neighbouring tundra sites in the Yukon, one in a sheltered location with tall shrubs exposed above deep snow and the other in an exposed location with dwarf shrubs covered by shallow snow. The snow was about twice as deep in the valley as on...

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