Catrin Edgeley

Catrin Edgeley
Northern Arizona University | NAU · School of Forestry

Ph.D. Natural Resources

About

23
Publications
5,103
Reads
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225
Citations
Introduction
I am an Assistant Professor in the School of Forestry at Northern Arizona University. I am a wildfire social scientist interested in understanding how socially diverse communities adapt to wildfire. This includes research on the social dimensions of post-fire recovery, evacuation planning and behaviors, support or opposition for different risk mitigation approaches, and community experiences with forest management and policy.
Additional affiliations
August 2019 - present
Northern Arizona University
Position
  • Professor (Assistant)
January 2019 - August 2019
University of Idaho
Position
  • PostDoc Position
Education
January 2015 - December 2018
University of Idaho
Field of study
  • Natural Resources
September 2013 - September 2014
Durham University
Field of study
  • Risk and Environmental Hazards
October 2010 - June 2013
Durham University
Field of study
  • Geography

Publications

Publications (23)
Article
Existing hazards literature highlights a growing need to understand long-term community recovery following impactful wildfire events. More specifically, little research explores how local perspectives about agency suppression efforts or the allocation of disaster aid following a wildfire influence recovery processes or adaptive actions to prepare f...
Article
Full-text available
Evacuation planning and management are increasingly important because of mounting risk and impacts to private properties from wildfires. Yet coordination of evacuation is complex, especially because individual residents may enact a variety of actions during fire events. Less research explores how pre-fire mitigation actions or potential event chara...
Article
Full-text available
Regulation of building standards and residential development practices in the wildland-urban interface (WUI) is increasingly advocated as a possible avenue for wildfire risk reduction. However, many documented instances of successful wildfire adaptation occur in incorporated communities with local governments or formalized structures for channeling...
Article
The increased global frequency and scale of impactful and destructive wildfires has necessitated the reimagination of recovery assistance in affected communities. Unequal experience with and access to resources to support recovery mean that organizations operating at different scales may provide varying types of assistance after fire, particularly...
Article
Households can experience the same wildfire event differently depending on the kinds of risks posed to them, among other factors. These experiences can influence support or opposition for local forest management. We administered a mixed-mode survey to households across three distinct groups with different sources of risk associated with the 2019 Mu...
Article
Knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about bats often underlie social support for bat management and intentions to conserve bats. Effective bat conservation and management hinges on understanding these drivers across contexts. Lands classified as wildland-urban interface (WUI) are rapidly expanding in the USA, increasing the likelihood of human-bat in...
Article
Full-text available
We surveyed forestry contractors in three sectors (logging, mastication, and trucking) across the states of Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado. Our survey sought to gather current demographic and background information on contractors as well as establish how a forest operations training center might address their employee training needs. Most of the...
Chapter
Full-text available
Forests in the southwestern USA are well adapted to dry conditions. High lightning incidence, long human habitation, and frequently windy conditions make the Southwest stand out for a high pace of burning. Forests are structured by climatic gradients created by elevation and topography. Low-elevation woodlands experience the driest conditions, but...
Article
Full-text available
Fire use is increasingly recognized as a central component of integrated land management in fire-prone places. Historically, fire use has been commonplace in many places in Ireland, where field burning is an established practice with a long pedigree among upland farmers seeking to improving forage among other benefits. This practice has been subjec...
Article
Full-text available
Formal regulation of private property and exploration of “risk transmission” across ownerships are two popular means for addressing wildfire management at landscape scales. However, existing studies also indicate that a number of barriers exist for implementing formal regulations surrounding wildfire risk, and that few efforts gauge influences on t...
Article
Full-text available
Combining Q-methodology with focus groups offers a novel opportunity to explore how researchers and managers can collectively address natural resource management issues. We explored the potential utility of this pairing for prioritizing long-term vegetation recovery research needs after wildfire at a two-day workshop. The approach entailed individu...
Article
Full-text available
COVID-19 has complicated wildfire management and public safety for the 2020 fire season. It is unclear whether COVID-19 has impacted the ability of residents in the wildland–urban interface to prepare for and evacuate from wildfire, or the extent to which residents feel their household’s safety has been affected. Several areas with high wildfire ri...
Article
Full-text available
There is a growing recognition that the social diversity of communities at risk from wildland fire may necessitate divergent combinations of policies, programs and incentives that allow diverse populations to promote fire adapted communities (FACs). However, there have been few coordinated research efforts to explore the perceived utility and effec...
Article
The research presented in this article responds to the deficit described above by exploring the ways that interaction between residents, land managers, fire professionals, and government officials’ influences local approaches to wildfire management. We use the term social dynamics in reference to the patterns, influences and perspectives characteri...
Article
Full-text available
Survey IDs are short strings of unique characters assigned to each recipient in a sample population. Extension research can benefit from the improved organization of survey implementation and data collection, better researcher-respondent communication, and reduced survey material costs supported through the use of survey IDs. This article outlines...
Article
Full-text available
Existing research indicates that distinct human populations may prepare for, experience, and recover from wildfires in different ways. However, research that helps explain differential adaptation actions surrounding wildfire events is rare. The research presented here applied an existing approach for characterizing the social diversity of communiti...
Article
Full-text available
A large body of research focuses on identifying patterns of human populations most at risk from hazards and the factors that help explain performance of mitigations that can help reduce that risk. One common concept in such studies is social vulnerability—human populations’ potential exposure to, sensitivity from and ability to reduce negative impa...
Article
Full-text available
Projected increases in wildfire risk and impacts to human populations in the UK have prompted the installation of expanded management approaches such as early warning systems (EWSs). Newer iterations of wildfire EWSs help mitigate risk through rapid detection, often using high-resolution monitoring technology and instantaneous information collectio...

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