Cathy Wazniak

Cathy Wazniak
State of MD · of Natural Resources

About

24
Publications
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Introduction

Publications

Publications (24)
Article
Full-text available
A new immunologically based flow cytometry (IFCM) technique was developed to enumerate Aureococcus anophagefferens, a small pelagophyte alga that is the cause of "brown tides" in bays and estuaries of the mid-Atlantic states along the U.S. coast. The method utilizes a monoclonal antibody conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC-MAb) to label...
Data
Intensive sampling of the Maryland Coastal Bays in May and July of 2007 served to further assess spatial patterns in nutrients, responses of biological indicators, seasons, land use, and nutrient cycling. Studies conducted in 2004 and 2006 had pinpointed the regions of St. Martin River and Johnsons Bay as areas of degraded water quality, high turbi...
Article
The mid-Atlantic coastal bays are shallow coastal lagoons, separated from the Atlantic Ocean by barrier sand islands with oceanic exchanges restricted to narrow inlets. The relatively poor flushing of these lagoon systems makes them susceptible to eutrophication resulting from anthropogenic nutrient loadings. An intensive water quality and seagrass...
Article
A retrospective analysis revealed that water quality in the coastal bays of Maryland (USA) has been declining over the past decade, as evidenced by increases in total nitrogenous nutrients and in outbreaks of brown tides caused by the pelagophyte Aureococcus anophagefferns. However, the increases in total nitrogen are not a function of increases in...
Article
A retrospective analysis revealed that water quality of the Coastal Bays of Maryland has been declining over the past decade, as evidenced by increases in total nitrogenous nutrients and in outbreaks of brown tides caused by the pelagophyte Aureococcus anophagefferns. However, the increases in total nitrogen are not a function of increases in inorg...
Data
Following on from a survey conducted in May of 2004, the current study was targeted to four small regions within the Coastal Bays, to assess in detail the nutrient inputs and sources within these regions. In that previous study, St Martins River is identified as a region with high nutrient inputs and overall poor water quality. St Martins River was...
Article
Full-text available
Although the Coastal Bays are shallow lagoons that typically do not stratify, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations were frequently low in some areas. Daytime measurements showed DO less than 5 mg/L during the summer throughout the St. Martin River and areas of Newport Bay, as well as in Manklin Creek, Herring Creek, Turville Creek, and areas of Chi...
Article
Full-text available
Macroalgae, also known as seaweeds, are abundant and well distributed in the Coastal Bays. Estuarine ecosystems with generally well-illuminated shallow bottoms and moderate to high nutrient loadings can be optimal environments for the development of high concentrations of macroalgae. Macroalgae (seaweeds) are large plant-like structures found in co...
Article
The rate of growth of juvenile hard clams, Mercenaria mercenaria, was studied in the Coastal Bays of Maryland during an outbreak of the brown tide, Aureococcus anophagefferens. Brown tide dominated the plankton community during the month of June 2002, with cell densities at several sites reaching category 3 (>200,000 cells ml−1) levels. Temperature...
Article
Full-text available
Total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) concentration data from the 2001 through 2003 Coastal Bays water quality monitoring program (Maryland Department of Natural Resources and Assateague Island National Seashore) were analyzed for status. TN and TP concentration data from Assateague Island National Seashore only were analyzed for trends (DN...
Article
Full-text available
The Water Quality Index synthesizes the status of the four water quality indicators; chlorophyll a (algae: Chl a), total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), and dissolved oxygen (DO) into a single indicator of water quality. This indicator is similar to the Dow Jones Index, which compiles information on multiple stocks and provides a simple numbe...
Article
Harmful algal blooms are an increasing phenomenon in coastal areas of the world. Recurring harmful brown tides caused by the minute alga, Aureococcus anophagefferens, are a regional problem in the northeast Atlantic states of the United States. Brown tide blooms may cause significant ecological impacts on natural resources. A Brown Tide Bloom Index...
Article
High stream nitrate was observed in all Coastal Bays segments. Stream nitrate is a relative measure of nutrients entering the system. High levels indicate excess inputs from human activities. These inputs are transported to the bays via surface runoff and groundwater. Streams and small creeks are often the initial receptors of pollutants, which the...
Article
Benthic chlorophyll was measured as part of the National Coastal Assessment Program in 2002 at 124 sites (Figure 4.5.1) and 2003 at 152 sites (Figure 4.5.2). This data shows that benthic microalgae or micro-phytobenthos play a significant role in the Coastal Bays and may even be greater than water column plankton biomass in some areas. Recommend be...
Article
Full-text available
Aureococcus anophagefferens, the micro-organism that causes brown tide, was first identified in the United States in 1987 and first discovered in Maryland during 1998, though recent research indicates that it was present since at least 1993. Brown tide blooms have been categorized based on their potential impacts to living resources (categories 1 (...
Article
Full-text available
Thirteen potentially harmful algae taxa have been identified in the Maryland Coastal Bays: Aureococcus anophagefferens (brown tide), Pfiesteria piscicida and P. shumwayae, Chattonella spp., Heterosigma akashiwo, Fibrocapsa japonica, Prorocentrum minimum, Dinophysis spp., Amphidinium spp., Pseudo-nitzchia spp., Karlodinium micrum, and two macroalgae...
Article
Seagrasses have been increasing annually since monitoring began in 1986. General consensus among the scientific community is that, despite recent increases documented by the aerial survey, seagrass coverage is considerably less than in the early 1900s. A disease virtually eliminated eelgrass (Zostera marinus) from the Coastal Bays in the 1930's, le...