Cathy Ma

Cathy Ma
University of British Columbia - Vancouver | UBC ·  Department of Psychology

About

31
Publications
3,815
Reads
How we measure 'reads'
A 'read' is counted each time someone views a publication summary (such as the title, abstract, and list of authors), clicks on a figure, or views or downloads the full-text. Learn more
780
Citations
Citations since 2016
11 Research Items
422 Citations
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060
20162017201820192020202120220102030405060

Publications

Publications (31)
Article
Neuroestrogens are synthesized within the brain and regulate social behavior, learning and memory, and cognition. In song sparrows, Melospiza melodia, 17β-estradiol (17β-E2) promotes aggressive behavior, including during the nonbreeding season when circulating steroid levels are low. Estrogens are challenging to measure because they are present at...
Article
Full-text available
Estrogens are steroid hormones that affect many aspects of brain function, including cognition, social behavior, and neuroprotection. It is well-known that estrogens are synthesized in the ovaries. Estrogens are also synthesized in the brain, where aromatase is expressed in specific regions. Importantly, estrogens play crucial roles in the brain, e...
Article
Full-text available
Steroid fatty acyl esters (FAEs) are a class of steroid conjugates that are abundant in circulation, have long half-lives, and are stored in lipid-rich tissues. Steroid-FAEs are present in many species, but their functions are poorly understood. They can be metabolized to active, unconjugated steroids and therefore may act as a reservoir of steroid...
Article
Corticosterone is produced by the adrenal glands and also produced locally by other organs, such as the brain. Local levels of corticosterone in specific brain regions during development are not known. Here, we microdissected brain tissue and developed a novel liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method (LC‐MS/MS) to measure a panel of 7...
Article
Steroids are secreted by the gonads and adrenal glands into the blood to modulate neurophysiology and behavior. In addition, the brain can metabolize circulating steroids and synthesize steroids de novo. Songbirds show high levels of neurosteroid synthesis. Here, we developed and validated a liquid chromatography‐tandem mass spectrometry (LC‐MS/MS)...
Article
As males age, systemic testosterone (T) levels decline. T regulates executive function, a collection of cognitive processes that are mediated by the mesocorticolimbic system. Here, we examined young adult (5 months) and aged (22 months) male Fischer 344 × Brown Norway rats, and measured systemic T levels in serum and local T levels in microdissecte...
Article
Full-text available
Migratory birds, including Gambel’s white-crowned sparrows (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii), exhibit profound modifications of skeletal muscles prior to migration, notably hypertrophy of the pectoralis muscle required for powered flight. Muscle growth may be influenced by anabolic effects of androgens; however, prior to spring departure, circulati...
Article
The transition between the breeding and non‐breeding states is often marked by a shift in energy balance. Despite this well‐known shift in energy balance, little work has explored seasonal differences in the orexigenic neuropeptides that regulate food intake in wild animals. Here we tested the hypothesis that free‐living male song sparrows (Melospi...
Article
17β-estradiol (E2) has numerous rapid effects on the brain and behavior. This review focuses on the rapid effects of E2on aggression, an important social behavior, in songbirds. First, we highlight the contributions of studies on song sparrows, which reveal that seasonal changes in the environment profoundly influence the capacity of E2to rapidly a...
Article
Across vertebrates, aggression is robustly expressed during the breeding season when circulating testosterone (T) is elevated, and T activates aggression either directly or after aromatization into 17β-estradiol (E2 ) in the brain. In some species, such as the song sparrow, aggressive behavior is also expressed at high levels during the non-breedin...
Article
Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone (GnRH) and Gonadotropin Inhibitory Hormone (GnIH) are neuropeptides secreted by the hypothalamus that regulate reproduction. GnRH receptors are present in the anterior pituitary, but they are also abundantly expressed in the hippocampus of rats, suggesting that GnRH regulates hippocampal function. GnIH inhibits pituit...
Article
Full-text available
Glucocorticoids (GCs) are produced by the adrenal glands and circulate in the blood to coordinate organismal physiology. In addition, different tissues may independently regulate their local GC levels via local GC synthesis. Here, we find that in the mouse, endogenous GCs show tissue-specific developmental patterns, rather than mirroring GCs in the...
Article
Recent studies have revealed the presence and regulation of aromatase at the vertebrate synapse and identified a critical role played by presynaptic estradiol synthesis in the electrophysiological response to auditory and other social cues. However, if and how synaptic aromatization affects behavior remains to be directly tested. We have exploited...
Article
Full-text available
The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) functions as a surveillance mechanism to detect chromosome misalignment and to delay anaphase until the errors are corrected. The SAC is thought to control mitosis and meiosis, including meiosis in mammalian eggs. However, it remains unknown if meiosis in the eggs of nonmammalian vertebrate species is also regu...
Article
Decreases in testosterone (T) and 17β-oestradiol (E(2) ) are associated with an increased risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD), which has been attributed to an increase in beta amyloid (Aβ) and tau pathologic lesions. While recent studies have used transgenic animal models to test the effects of sex steroid manipulations on AD-like pathology, virtuall...
Article
Full-text available
Aurora B (Aur-B) plays multiple roles in mitosis, of which the best known are to ensure bi-orientation of sister chromatids by destabilizing incorrectly attached kinetochore microtubules and to participate in cytokinesis. Studies in Xenopus egg extracts, however, have indicated that Aur-B and the chromosome passenger complex play an important role...
Article
The recent applications of light scattering technique in biochemical analysis have been reviewed. The mechanic theories of resonance light scattering and Rayleigh light scattering (RLS), the relationships and differences between them, their applications and the interference factors in biochemistry analysis have been covered. By contrasting Rayleigh...
Article
Full-text available
It is well recognized that steroids are synthesized de novo in the brain (neurosteroids). In addition, steroids circulating in the blood enter the brain. Steroids play numerous roles in the brain, such as influencing neural development, adult neuroplasticity, behavior, neuroinflammation, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease. I...
Article
Polar body emission is a specialized cell division throughout the animal kingdom, serving to reduce chromosome ploidy while preserving the egg cytoplasm. Critical to polar body emission are the asymmetric positioning of the meiotic spindle prior to anaphase, with one pole attached to the oocyte cortex, and the simultaneous membrane protrusion durin...
Article
Full-text available
Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis, is a nonredundant and essential gene in all eukaryotes. During the mitotic cell cycle, ODC exhibits two activity peaks: one at the G1/S transition and one during the G2/M transition. The physiological role of this cell cycle-dependent ODC activity dynamic is not clea...
Article
Vertebrate oocyte maturation is an extreme form of asymmetric cell division, producing a mature egg alongside a diminutive polar body. Critical to this process is the attachment of one spindle pole to the oocyte cortex prior to anaphase. We report here that asymmetric spindle pole attachment and anaphase initiation are required for localized cortic...
Article
During vertebrate egg maturation, cytokinesis initiates after one pole of the bipolar metaphase I spindle attaches to the oocyte cortex, resulting in the formation of a polar body and the mature egg. It is not known what signal couples the spindle pole positioning to polar body formation. We approached this question by drawing an analogy to mitotic...
Article
Two forms of the classical progesterone receptors (PR), XPR-1 and XPR-2, have been cloned in Xenopus laevis. Their relative roles in mediating progesterone action in the ovaries are not clear. Using antibodies generated against the cloned XPR-2, we demonstrated here that the somatic follicle cells expressed an 80-kDa PR protein, termed XPR-1. Treat...
Article
Full-text available
Xenopus Aurora-A (also known as Eg2) is a member of the Aurora family of mitotic serine/threonine kinases. In Xenopus oocytes, Aurora-A phosphorylates and activates a cytoplasmic mRNA polyadenylation factor (CPEB) and therefore plays a pivotal role in MOS translation. However, hyperphosphorylation and activation of Aurora-A appear to be dependent o...
Article
Progesterone induces the resumption of meiosis (maturation) in Xenopus oocytes through a nongenomic mechanism involving inhibition of an oocyte adenylyl cyclase and reduction of intracellular cAMP. However, progesterone action in Xenopus oocytes is not blocked by pertussis toxin, and this finding indicates that the inhibition of the oocyte adenylyl...

Network

Cited By