Cathryn Wynn-Edwards

Cathryn Wynn-Edwards
University of Tasmania · Institute for Marine and Antarctic Studies (IMAS)

PhD Quantitative Marine Science

About

6
Publications
737
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32
Citations
Introduction
Sediment trap time-series at the Australian Southern Ocean Time-Series. Sample analysis and data curation Production of annual reports and QC documentation available freely.
Additional affiliations
March 2017 - July 2019
University of Tasmania
Position
  • Carbon Marine Analytical Chemist

Publications

Publications (6)
Article
Changes in Southern Ocean biogeochemistry: observations from moored observatory, remote access sampling, sensor arrays.
Article
Full-text available
The Southern Ocean absorbs a great deal of heat and carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, helping to shape the global climate. This oceanic service comes at a cost: the Southern Ocean is becoming warmer, fresher, less oxygenated, and more acidic—in effect heating up, losing breath, and becoming corrosive. The consequences of these changes are d...
Article
Full-text available
The Southern Ocean (SO) is a globally significant region for carbon export, with the capacity for increased biological carbon pump (BCP) strength due to under-used surface macro-nutrients. Assessing how climate change will alter this region’s ability and efficiency to take up atmospheric CO2 is paramount. Long-term particle flux observations are im...
Technical Report
Full-text available
This report details the quality assessment and control procedures applied to the particle flux data collected by the Subantarctic Zone (SAZ) sediment trap moorings. The datasets are publicly available via the AODN Data Portal https://portal.aodn.org.au/search.
Article
Full-text available
Increased seawater pCO(2) has the potential to alter phytoplankton biochemistry, which in turn may negatively affect the nutritional quality of phytoplankton as food for grazers. Our aim was to identify how Antarctic phytoplankton, Pyramimonas gelidicola, Phaeocystis antarctica, and Gymnodinium sp., respond to increased pCO(2). Cultures were mainta...
Article
Full-text available
Around one third of all anthropogenic CO2 emissions have been absorbed by the oceans, causing changes in seawater pH and carbonate chemistry. These changes have the potential to affect phytoplankton, which are critically important for marine food webs and the global carbon cycle. However, our current knowledge of how phytoplankton will respond to t...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
Southern Ocean Time Series, Sub-Antarctic Zone sediment trap sample analysis.