Catherine Waite

Catherine Waite
University of the Sunshine Coast | USC · Forest Research Institute

PhD

About

8
Publications
6,227
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78
Citations

Publications

Publications (8)
Article
Full-text available
The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is one of the most recognized global patterns of species richness exhibited across a wide range of taxa. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed in the past two centuries to explain LDG, but rigorous tests of the drivers of LDGs have been limited by a lack of high-quality global species richness data. Here we...
Article
Full-text available
Lianas (woody vines) are abundant and diverse, particularly in tropical ecosystems. Lianas use trees for structural support to reach the forest canopy, often putting leaves above their host tree. Thus they are major parts of many forest canopies. Yet, relatively little is known about distributions of lianas in tropical forest canopies, because stud...
Article
Tropical forests are the most diverse and productive ecosystems on Earth. While better understanding of these forests is critical for our collective future, until quite recently efforts to measure and monitor them have been largely disconnected. Networking is essential to discover the answers to questions that transcend borders and the horizons of...
Article
Full-text available
O objetivo foi abordar um mosaico de vegetação de savana (áreas marginais-MS e disjuntas-DS) no Cerrado Setentrional Brasileiro para investigar o papel desempenhado por fatores ambientais como determinantes da organização comunitária em escala espacial, a fim de compreender os padrões divergentes ao longo de uma gradiente ambiental. Analisamos pred...
Article
Tropical forests are the most diverse and productive ecosystems on Earth. While better understanding of these forests is critical for our collective future, until quite recently efforts to measure and monitor them have been largely disconnected. Networking is essential to discover the answers to questions that transcend borders and the horizons of...
Article
Tropical forests are the most diverse and productive ecosystems on Earth. While better understanding of these forests is critical for our collective future, until quite recently efforts to measure and monitor them have been largely disconnected. Networking is essential to discover the answers to questions that transcend borders and the horizons of...
Thesis
Lianas play integral roles in structuring community composition, forest regeneration, the maintenance of species diversity and whole-forest level ecosystem processes in tropical forests. With increasing disturbances to forests worldwide, the relative importance of lianas as players in many areas of forest dynamics is expected to increase, with impo...
Article
Full-text available
1. Tropical forests store and sequester large quantities of carbon, mitigating climate change. Lianas (woody vines) are important tropical forest components, most conspicuous in the canopy. Lianas reduce forest carbon uptake and their recent increase may, therefore, limit forest carbon storage with global consequences for climate change. Liana infe...

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Projects

Projects (2)
Project
This project is a Theme Issue in Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, Series B. The issue presents major scientific advances, both biological, socio-economic and interdisciplinary, that will contribute towards forest landscape restoration for the benefit of nature and people. The issue has input from leading researchers from across the world, and from the IUCN, UNEP and FAO teams overseeing the UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration, with whom we are working to communicate the major findings to policymakers and practitioners.
Project
A long-term pantropical study investigating tropical forest recovery from degradation under varying climates. The project is developing a network of permanent sample plots along degradation and climate gradients across the tropics, beginning in East Africa and Australia. These will be used to monitor succession in forest biomass and biodiversity with and without management to investigate succession, ecological resilience and to plan for future interventions and project environmental change.