Catherine Ribeiro

Catherine Ribeiro
Universidad Mayor · Centro GEMA - Genómica, Ecología y Medio Ambiente

PhD in Biological Oceanography

About

30
Publications
9,154
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190
Citations

Publications

Publications (30)
Chapter
Full-text available
Photosymbiosis is a symbiotic relationship between two or more organisms, one of which is capable of photosynthesis. Like other forms of symbiosis, photosymbioses can involve the full spectrum of trophic interactions from mutualism through commensalism to parasitism. As in marine benthic environments (e.g., coral reef ecosystems), photosymbiotic as...
Article
Full-text available
For almost three decades, flow cytometry has allowed researchers to investigate ocean planktonic communities using size and cell fluorescence properties. However, oceanographic applications must face two constraints. First, when dealing with marine microbes, instruments must be sensitive because these organisms are very small and with low fluoresce...
Preprint
Full-text available
Phytoplankton under-ice blooms have been recently recognized as an important Arctic phenomenon for global primary production and biogeochemical cycling. Drastic sea-ice decline enables the development of early blooms, sometimes hundreds of kilometers beneath the pack ice. Baffin Bay is a semi-enclosed sea where Arctic and North Atlantic water masse...
Preprint
The Green Edge project was designed to investigate the onset, life and fate of a phytoplankton spring bloom (PSB) in the Arctic Ocean. The lengthening of the ice-free period and the warming of seawater, amongst other factors, have induced major changes in arctic ocean biology over the last decades. Because the PSB is at the base of the Arctic Ocean...
Chapter
Full-text available
Preprint is available here: https://daniel-vaulot.fr/files/papers/LopesdosSantos_chapter_2021.pdf. Metabarcoding or high-throughput sequencing of a specific genetic marker is a powerful technique, widely used today, to analyze biodiversity across distinct environments and taxonomic groups. Plankton ecologists have benefited tremendously from the g...
Article
Full-text available
Year-round reports of phytoplankton dynamics in the West Antarctic Peninsula are rare and mainly limited to microscopy and/or pigment-based studies. We analyzed the phytoplankton community from coastal waters of Fildes Bay in the West Antarctic Peninsula between January 2014 and 2015 using metabarcoding of the nuclear and plastidial 18/16S rRNA gen...
Article
Full-text available
The haptophyte genus Pseudohaptolina (formerly Chrysochromulina clade B1-3) currently harbours two species: Pseudohaptolina arctica and Pseudohaptolina sorokinii. In addition, Chrysochromulina birgeri is expected to belong to this genus due to its morphological similarity to P. sorokinii, but it has not yet been genetically characterised. A strain...
Preprint
Full-text available
Year-round reports of phytoplankton dynamics in the West Antarctic Peninsula are rare and mainly limited to microscopy and/or pigment-based studies. We analyzed the phytoplankton community from coastal waters of Fildes Bay in the West Antarctic Peninsula between January 2014 and 2015 using metabarcoding of the nuclear and plastidial 18/16S rRNA gen...
Preprint
For metabarcoding purpose, the first step involves the amplification by PCR of a given gene region (for example V4 or V9 region of 18S rRNA gene) or gene itself if its size does not exceed 600bp (the highest fragment size that can be sequenced by Illumina technology). The defined forward and reverse primers that are complementary upstream and downs...
Preprint
Full-text available
For metabarcoding purpose, the first step involves the amplification by PCR of a given gene region (for example V4 or V9 region of 18S rRNA gene) or gene itself if its size does not exceed 600bp (the longest fragment size that can be sequenced by Illumina technology). The defined forward and reverse primers that are complementary upstream and downs...
Preprint
For metabarcoding purpose, the first step involves the amplification by PCR of a given gene region (for example V4 or V9 region of 18S rRNA gene) or gene itself if its size does not exceed 600bp (the longest fragment size that can be sequenced by Illumina technology). The defined forward and reverse primers that are complementary upstream and downs...
Preprint
Full-text available
The haptophyte genus Pseudohaptolina (formerly Chrysochromulina clade B1-3) currently harbors two species: Pseudohaptolina arctica and Pseudohaptolina sorokinii . In addition, Chrysochromulina birgeri is expected to belong to this genus due to its morphological similarity to P. sorokinii , but has not yet been genetically characterized. A strain be...
Article
Full-text available
Massive phytoplankton blooms develop at the Arctic ice edge, sometimes extending far under the pack ice. An extensive culturing effort was conducted before and during a phytoplankton bloom in Baffin Bay between April and July 2016. Different isolation strategies were applied, including flow cytometry cell sorting, manual single cell pipetting, and...
Article
Full-text available
The Green Edge initiative was developed to investigate the processes controlling the primary productivity and fate of organic matter produced during the Arctic phytoplankton spring bloom (PSB) and to determine its role in the ecosystem. Two field campaigns were conducted in 2015 and 2016 at an ice camp located on landfast sea ice southeast of Qikiq...
Article
Full-text available
Members of the class Mamiellophyceae comprise species that can dominate picophytoplankton diversity in polar waters. Yet polar species are often morphologically indistinguishable from temperate species, although clearly separated by molecular features. Here we examine four Mamiellophyceae strains from the Canadian Arctic. The 18S rRNA and Internal...
Article
Full-text available
The Green Edge initiative was developed to investigate the processes controlling the primary productivity and the fate of organic matter produced during the Arctic phytoplankton spring bloom (PSB) and to determine its role in the ecosystem. Two field campaigns were conducted in 2015 and 2016 at an ice camp located on landfast sea ice southeast of Q...
Preprint
Full-text available
Massive phytoplankton blooms develop at the Arctic ice edge, sometimes extending far under the pack ice. An extensive culturing effort was conducted before and during a phytoplankton bloom in Baffin Bay between April and July 2016. Different isolation strategies were applied, including flow cytometry cell sorting, manual single cell pipetting and s...
Preprint
Full-text available
Members of the class Mamiellophyceae comprise species that can dominate picophytoplankton diversity in polar waters. Yet polar species are often morphologically indistinguishable from temperate species, although clearly separated by molecular features. Here we examine four Mamiellophyceae strains from the Canadian Arctic. The 18S rRNA and Internal...
Article
Full-text available
Symbioses between eukaryotic algae and nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria have been recognized in recent years as a key source of new nitrogen in the oceans. We investigated the composition of the small photosynthetic eukaryote communities associated with nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria in the Brazilian South Atlantic Bight using a combination of flow cyt...
Poster
Full-text available
Polar environments are undergoing dramatic changes, as the rapidly shrinking ice cover in the Arctic Ocean opens path for phytoplankton blooms profiting from the increased incident light. Green Edge is a multidisciplinary franco-canadien project, enrolling almost 20 institutions from both countries. Its main goal is to understand the dynamics of th...
Article
Full-text available
Pico and nanoplankton communities from the Southwest Atlantic Ocean along the Brazilian Bight are poorly described. The hydrography in this region is dominated by a complex system of layered water masses, which includes the warm and oligotrophic Tropical Water (TW), the cold and nutrient rich South Atlantic Central Water (SACW) and the Coastal Wate...
Data
Surface distributions of total heterotrophic bacteria (A), Prochlorococcus (B), Synechococcus (C), picoeukaryotes (D) and nanoeukaryotes (E) in cells mL−1
Data
Example of flow cytometry gating patterns used to discriminate the different pico- and nanoplanktonic populations (A) Side scatter versus chlorophyll-a and (B) phycoerythrin versus chlorophyll-a: Prochlorococcus (pink), Synechococcus (green), picoeukaryotes (blue) and nanoeukaryotes (orange); (C) side scatter versus DNA fluorescence: heterotrophic...
Data
Vertical distributions of biotic data Vertical distributions (from the top) of: total autotrophic biomass (µgC L−1), relative contribution to total biomass (in percentage) of total heterotrophic bacteria, and relative contribution to autotrophic biomass (in percentage) of Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and picoeukaryotes, for TR1 (A–E, right column...
Data
Surface distributions of temperature (T °C) (A), salinity (B), fluorescence (RFU) (C), nitrates (µM) (D) and phosphates (µM) (E)
Data
Surface distributions of biotic data Surface distributions of total autotrophic biomass (µgC.L−1) (A), relative contribution to total biomass (in percentage) of total heterotrophic bacteria (B), relative contribution to autotrophic biomass (in percentage) of Prochlorococcus (C), Synechococcus (D) and picoeukaryotes (E).
Article
Full-text available
The mangrove's sediments from the coastal areas under human activities may contain significant contaminations by hydrocarbons, even when there are no visual evidences of it. The microorganisms are essential to these ecosystems, especially in the control of their chemical environment. Sediment samples were collected in two regions under different en...
Article
Full-text available
In this work, the density of bacterioplankton, bacterial biomass and environmental variables were monitored in two seasons (summer and winter), two times each month (spring tide and neap tide sampling), over a 12 h period, comprising a tidal cycle (semidiurnal), from subsurface and bottom waters, in a fixed station in the Estuarine Turbidity Maximu...

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Project (1)
Project
The aim of the French Canadian Green Edge project is to study the phytoplankton that develops at the edge of the ice pack during the Spring. Climate change has triggered fundamental modifications of marine biotopes in the Arctic Ocean. The decrease in the extent of the ice pack during summer has led to a 20% increase in pan-Arctic primary production over the last decade. Phytoplankton blooms now occur earlier in several parts of the Arctic Ocean. In other parts, the structure of the phytoplankton community is shifting toward smaller species, typical of more oligotrophic conditions and some species found in warmer waters now migrate into the Arctic Ocean. Phytoplankton grow in the top tens of meters of both ice-free and ice-covered waters. The phytoplankton spring bloom (PSB) that develops at the ice-edge accounts for >50% of annual primary production in the AO and is generally associated with both large energy transfer to higher trophic levels and export of carbon to the bottom. In turn, the culture, health and economic capacity building of Northerners are closely associated with marine resources supported by the PSB. The Arctic PSB develops in the seasonally-covered ice zone, the extent of which is expected to increase significantly during the next years, possibly over the whole AO as early as in 2030. How the PSB will evolve in this context is currently unknown. The aim of Green Edge is to study the development of the Phytoplankton Bloom that takes place at the ice edge when the ice melts. The project focuses on the Baffin Bay and combines an Ice Camp which samples under the ice during the three months prior to the bloom and a cruise with the Amundsen Ice Breaker that will follow the development of the bloom.