Catherine P Lu

Catherine P Lu
The Rockefeller University | Rockefeller

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12
Publications
1,421
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971
Citations

Publications

Publications (12)
Article
Full-text available
Tissue homeostasis and regeneration rely on resident stem cells (SCs), whose behaviour is regulated through niche-dependent crosstalk. The mechanisms underlying SC identity are still unfolding. Here, using spatiotemporal gene ablation in murine hair follicles, we uncover a critical role for the transcription factors (TFs) nuclear factor IB (NFIB) a...
Article
Tissue stem cells contribute to tissue regeneration and wound repair through cellular programs that can be hijacked by cancer cells. Here, we investigate such a phenomenon in skin, where during homeostasis, stem cells of the epidermis and hair follicle fuel their respective tissues. We find that breakdown of stem cell lineage confinement—granting p...
Article
The gain of eccrine sweat glands in hairy body skin has empowered humans to run marathons and tolerate temperature extremes. Epithelial-mesenchymal cross-talk is integral to the diverse patterning of skin appendages, but the molecular events underlying their specification remain largely unknown. Using genome-wide analyses and functional studies, we...
Article
Aged skin heals wounds poorly, increasing susceptibility to infections. Restoring homeostasis after wounding requires the coordinated actions of epidermal and immune cells. Here we find that both intrinsic defects and communication with immune cells are impaired in aged keratinocytes, diminishing their efficiency in restoring the skin barrier after...
Article
Full-text available
The human body is covered with several million sweat glands. These tiny coiled tubular skin appendages produce the sweat that is our primary source of cooling and hydration of the skin. Numerous studies have been published on their morphology and physiology. Until recently, however, little was known about how glandular skin maintains homeostasis an...
Article
Sweat glands are abundant in the body and essential for thermoregulation. Like mammary glands, they originate from epidermal progenitors. However, they display few signs of cellular turnover, and whether they have stem cells and tissue-regenerative capacity remains largely unexplored. Using lineage tracing, we here identify in sweat ducts multipote...
Article
Homeostasis and wound healing rely on stem cells (SCs) whose activity and directed migration are often governed by Wnt signaling. In dissecting how this pathway integrates with the necessary downstream cytoskeletal dynamics, we discovered that GSK3β, a kinase inhibited by Wnt signaling, directly phosphorylates ACF7, a > 500 kDa microtubule-actin cr...
Article
Full-text available
Tn5 transposase cleaves the transposon end using a hairpin intermediate on the transposon end. This involves a flipped base that is stacked against a tryptophan residue in the protein. However, many other members of the cut-and-paste transposase family, including the RAG1 protein, produce a hairpin on the flanking DNA. We have investigated the reve...
Article
Full-text available
Hypomorphic RAG mutants with severely reduced V(D)J recombination activity cause Omenn Syndrome (OS), an immunodeficiency with features of immune dysregulation and a restricted TCR repertoire. Precisely how RAG mutants produce autoimmune and allergic symptoms has been unclear. Current models posit that the severe recombination defect restricts the...
Article
Full-text available
The Rag1 and Rag2 proteins initiate V(D)J recombination by introducing site-specific DNA double-strand breaks. Cleavage occurs by nicking one DNA strand, followed by a one-step transesterification reaction that forms a DNA hairpin structure. A similar reaction allows Rag transposition, in which the 3′-OH groups produced by Rag cleavage are joined t...
Article
Full-text available
The Rag proteins carry out V(D)J recombination through a process mechanistically similar to cut-and-paste transposition. Specifically, Rag complexes form DNA hairpins through direct transesterification, using a catalytic Asp-Asp-Glu (DDE) triad in Rag1. How is sufficient DNA distortion introduced to allow hairpin formation? We hypothesized that, li...

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