Catherine M Hill

Catherine M Hill
Oxford Brookes University · Department of Social Sciences

PhD Anthropology

About

68
Publications
97,895
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2,987
Citations
Citations since 2016
26 Research Items
1839 Citations
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2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200250300

Publications

Publications (68)
Article
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Human-wildlife coexistence is possible when animals can meet their ecological requirements while managing human-induced risks. Understanding how wildlife balance these trade-offs in anthropogenic environments is crucial to develop effective strategies to reduce risks of negative interactions, including bi-directional aggression and disease transmis...
Article
Full-text available
Tropical forests support a diversity of plants. Many of them are threatened, emphasising that their shared use by people and wildlife may benefit their conservation. Litt forests of southeast Madagascar, home to seven threatened lemur species, provide the Antanosy people with natural resources. In the early 2000s, protected areas were established i...
Article
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Forest-agricultural mosaics are now considered critical for biodiversity. Within these landscapes, the type of land use surrounding remnant forests influences the ability of arboreal non-flying wildlife to travel, disperse and ultimately survive, making arboreal species disproportionally impacted from habitat change. To inform land management strat...
Article
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The mountain gorilla, Gorilla beringei beringei, is listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as Endangered. About 1000 individuals remain in the wild, and the loss of even a single animal has implications for the viability of their two populations. Poaching, political instability and risk of anthropozoonotic disease trans...
Article
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Crop foraging or crop raiding concerns wildlife foraging and farmers' reactions and responses to it. To understand crop foraging and its value to wildlife or its implications for humans requires a cross-disciplinary approach that considers the behavior and ecology of wild animals engaging in this behavior; the types and levels of competition for re...
Article
Human–primate conflict is when humans experience “costs” as a consequence of primate presence or action. Common costs of coexisting with primates include damage to crops and property, and threat of injury or disease transmission to humans, livestock, and pets. Crop foraging behavior is recorded for a range of primate genera, and should be understoo...
Article
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One of the main challenges when integrating biological and social perspectives in primatology is overcoming interdisciplinary barriers. Unfamiliarity with subject-specific theory and language, distinct disciplinary-bound approaches to research, and academic boundaries aimed at “preserving the integrity” of subject disciplines can hinder development...
Article
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Western lowland gorillas (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) are among the most studied nonhuman primates. However, managing them in captivity is not without its challenges. Understanding individual differences between gorillas, as well as differences in group dynamics, may be of high value for more efficient captive management. The capacity to predict behav...
Article
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Qualitative methods are important to gain a deep understanding of complex problems and poorly researched areas. They can be particularly useful to help explain underlying conservation problems. However, the significance in choosing and justifying appropriate methodological frameworks in conservation studies should be given more attention to ensure...
Article
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Representations of animals are diverse and can portray local understandings of nature conservation, information that is often missing from conservation debates. In Cantanhez National Park (southern Guinea-Bissau), chimpanzees ( Pan troglodytes verus ) are recognized as animals that share certain features with humans but live independently of them i...
Article
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In Cantanhez National Park in Guinea-Bissau the construction of meaning made after encounters with chimpanzees is associated with local social life. If a chimpanzee makes an unprovoked attack on a person, its actions are often understood as those of a sorcerer. Chimpanzees are involved in two parallel accusation discourses: one is played in intimat...
Article
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Crop damage by non-human primates can cause friction between local people, government wildlife agencies and conservationists. Consequently, developing effective, non-lethal methods to protect crops against primate foraging could benefit farmers, reduce conflicts between interest groups, and even promote primate conservation The purpose of this rese...
Book
Full-text available
Conflicts about wildlife are usually portrayed and understood as resulting from the negative impacts of wildlife on human livelihoods or property. However, a greater depth of analysis reveals that many instances of human-wildlife conflict are often better understood as people-people conflict, wherein there is a clash of values between different hum...
Chapter
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Crop raiding” refers to wild animals damaging plant crops cultivated by humans, by either feeding on or trampling them, but it would be better labeled as “crop foraging.” Many species forage on crops, but the extent of damage caused is highly variable. Relatively little is known about the nutritional value of crops to primates and how they incorpor...
Article
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ABSTRACT Introduction Methods  Results  Discussion  Full Article  Figures & data References  Citations Metrics  Reprints & Permissions  PDF Abstract Humans and primates are coming into increasing contact within urban landscapes. Few studies have investigated how the impacts of living alongside urban primates affect residents...
Article
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Primatology fieldwork is increasingly carried out with permission and support from local people and district and national level government personnel. This requires researchers to develop relationships with local residents and officials particularly. Consequently, it is impossible to do such fieldwork without influencing the attitudes, behaviour and...
Research
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Report outlining details of crop protection methods developed and trialed with farmers in north-western Uganda. Techniques developed are designed to reduce crop losses from non-human primate species and wild pigs particularly.
Article
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Previously I argued that prioritizing farmers’ concerns, priorities, and understandings of human-wildlife interactions was central to developing effective human-wildlife conflict (HWC) mitigation, presupposing that HWC is about the costs of coexisting with wildlife. Further experience and the wider literature suggest this is not always true. Identi...
Article
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We are in a new epoch, the Anthropocene, and research into our closest living relatives, the great apes, must keep pace with the rate that our species is driving change. While a goal of many studies is to understand how great apes behave in natural contexts, the impact of human activities must increasingly be taken into account. This is both a chal...
Article
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We calculated the population density of the critically endangered Callicebus oenanthe in the Ojos de Agua Conservation Concession, a dry forest area in the department of San Martin, Peru. Results showed significant differences (p < 0.01) in group densities between forest boundaries (16.5 groups/km2, IQR = 21.1-11.0) and forest interior (4.0 groups/...
Article
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Considering how people perceive risks to their livelihoods from local wildlife is central to (i) understanding the impact of crop damage by animals on local people and (ii) recognising how this influences their interactions with, and attitudes towards, wildlife. Participatory risk mapping (PRM) is a simple, analytical tool that can be used to ident...
Article
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![Figure][1] Perceived threat. Fear complicates conservation. PHOTO: BARDROCK/WIKIMEDIA COMMONS In their Perspective, “Tolerance for predatory wildlife” (2 May, p. [476][2]), A. Treves and J. Bruskotter argue that when examining reasons for intolerance of and intention to kill predators
Article
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Crop-raiding by primates and bushpigs Potamochoerus porcus is a major cause of human–wildlife conflict around Budongo Forest Reserve, Uganda. In 2006–2007 a project was initiated, with farmer participation, to investigate the efficacy of on-farm techniques to reduce crop-raiding, including guarding and early-warning techniques, fences, plant barrie...
Article
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Human-wildlife conflict often arises from crop-raiding, and insights regarding which aspects of raiding events determine crop loss are essential when developing and evaluating deterrents. However, because accounts of crop-raiding behaviour are frequently indirect, these parameters are rarely quantified or explicitly linked to crop damage. Using sys...
Article
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Conflict between farmers and primates increasingly impacts conservation efforts in Africa and Asia. Field crops provide a reliable and readily-accessible source of food for primates coping with habitat loss. However, crop-raiding undermines food security and tolerance of wildlife within neighbouring human communities. Many primates consume crops re...
Article
We describe the behavior of a previously unstudied community of wild chimpanzees during opportunistic encounters with researchers in an unprotected forest-farm mosaic at Bulindi, Uganda. Data were collected during 115 encounters between May 2006 and January 2008. Individual responses were recorded during the first minute of visual contact. The most...
Article
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Nonhuman primates (referred to as primates in this study) are sometimes revered as gods, abhorred as evil spirits, killed for food because they damage crops, or butchered for sport. Primates' perceived similarity to humans places them in an anomalous position. While some human groups accept the idea that primates "straddle" the human-nonhuman bound...
Article
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This article outlines the importance of exploring farmers’ perspectives of human–wildlife conflicts because people’s perceptions and expectations shape their attitudes and responses to crop raiding by wildlife. A series of factors that influence farmers’ perceptions of risk are examined to help explain why perceived risk of crop loss to wildlife is...
Article
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The main threat to the survival of primates in Sumatra is habitat destruction, but there is also an increasing problem of conflict with local people due to crop-raiding. This study characterizes the perceived impacts of primate crop-raiding in four villages in North Sumatra. Ninety-eight semi-structured interviews were conducted to collect data on...
Article
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Crop raiding by primates in particular and wild animals in general is a significant source of people-forest conflict around the Budongo Forest Reserve, Uganda. Crop loss to wild animals undermines local support for conservation efforts in this area. Patterns of primate crop raiding were studied over a period of 14 months in six villages (five adjac...
Article
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Primate crop raiding is a major cause of human-wildlife conflict around the forests of western Uganda. In an attempt to ameliorate the situation a conflict mitigation strategy was established in villages around the Budongo Forest Reserve in 2001. Live-traps were constructed that allowed the identification of crop raiding animals; pest species could...
Article
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Hunting and habitat destruction and alteration threaten the existence of many primate species. However, the conservation of these primates has significant costs, as well as benefits, for people living alongside them. Conservation policy now recognizes that people should not suffer impoverishment from wildlife preservation and that, instead, conserv...
Technical Report
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The conflict that occurs between people and wildlife when animals leave protected areas and raid their crops is becoming one of the largest problems for conservation managers around the world. This is particularly so in Africa where there are still many large mammals such as elephant, buffalo and rhino which not only eat large amounts of crops but...
Article
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Much has been written about insect damage to standing crops, but an area that has received little attention within agricultural development, conserva-tion, and primatological literature is that of primates and the potential damage they can cause to farmers' fields. This is likely to become an increasingly important issue for people interested in pr...
Chapter
It is widely recognised that men and women in societies all over the world have very different experiences of sickness and health. This collection brings together biological and social anthropologists whose work illustrates how these sub-disciplines have approached the task of explaining such differences. We demonstrate that an understanding of sci...
Article
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The 'insurance ova' hypothesis (Anderson, 1990) views dizygotic twinning as a by-product of selection for multiple ovulation which sometimes--in error--results in the birth of twins. From this viewpoint, polyovulation is a mechanism which reduces the risks of fertilization failure or embryo defect/mortality. If DZ twin births are a 'side-effect' of...
Article
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Attitudes of local people to wildlife, and particularly to large animals, are an increasingly important element of conservation work, but attitudes may vary within a community according to gender, and prior experience of wildlife. Data were collected by questionnaire and informal interviews with 59 men and 57 women living on the southern edge of th...
Article
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The aim of this paper is to determine the extent to which wild vertebrates are perceived to damage crops, and to identify factors that help predict farmers' vulnerability to these animals. Data were collected using questionnaires and informal interviews in a farming community in western Uganda. Approximately 70% of farmers interviewed are wholly de...
Article
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La gemellite est relativement rare, mais quel que soit le taux de gemellite dans une population, l'arrivee de jumeaux a toujours un impact considerable (consequences physiques pour la mere, cout pour les parents, integration sociale, gestion de la ressemblance physique, problemes au niveau de l'heritage et de la primogeniture). L'etude de la litter...
Article
We summarize the ethnographic literature illustrating that "abnormal birth" circumstances and "ill omens" operate as cues to terminate parental investment. A review of the medical literature provides evidence to support our assertion that ill omens serve as markers of biological conditions that will threaten the survival of infants. Daly and Wilson...
Article
During an 18-mo field study of diana monkeys in Sierra Leone, data were collected to investigate whether adult females are involved in territorial calling bouts, and if so, how male and female calling behavior interrelated. Female chatter-scream vocalizations were heard during territorial calling bouts and intergroup encounters. Adult females initi...

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