Catherine Good

Catherine Good
City University of New York - Bernard M. Baruch College | Baruch College · Department of Psychology

About

18
Publications
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Introduction
Skills and Expertise

Publications

Publications (18)
Conference Paper
Background / Purpose: It was previously found that stereotype threat not only impaired females' performance on a math task, but also created a significant relationship between their neurocognitive response to error feedback and their ability to optimally utilize a math tutor to correct that error on a subsequent test (1). This relationship was no...
Article
Can comforting struggling students demotivate them and potentially decrease the pool of students pursuing math-related subjects? In Studies 1–3, instructors holding an entity (fixed) theory of math intelligence more readily judged students to have low ability than those holding an incremental (malleable) theory. Studies 2–3 further revealed that th...
Article
Sense of belonging to math-one's feelings of membership and acceptance in the math domain-was established as a new and an important factor in the representation gap between males and females in math. First, a new scale of sense of belonging to math was created and validated, and was found to predict unique variance in college students' intent to pu...
Article
Full-text available
Gender-based stereotypes undermine females' performance on challenging math tests, but how do they influence their ability to learn from the errors they make? Females under stereotype threat or non-threat were presented with accuracy feedback after each problem on a GRE-like math test, followed by an optional interactive tutorial that provided step...
Article
Full-text available
It is well established that negative stereotypes can undermine women's performance on mathematics tests. Despite considerable laboratory evidence for the role of “stereotype threat” in girls' and women's math test performance, the relevance of such findings for the “real world” gender test-score gap remains unclear and debates about causes focus pr...
Article
Each of us possesses multiple social identities. For example, our sex, age, race, social class, religion, political beliefs, and professions are all potential social identities. In certain contexts in which we find ourselves, that social identity may be devalued. For example, Democrats at the Republican National Convention, gays and lesbians at a c...
Article
Being in the numerical minority can impair intellectual performance. We suggest, however, that these negative effects need not extend to everyone because some people—specifically high self-monitors—can overcome the effects of situationally activated stereotypes. In two studies, we manipulated the race/sex composition of small groups and assessed in...
Article
Full-text available
Students' beliefs and goals can powerfully influence their learning success. Those who believe intelligence is a fixed entity (entity theorists) tend to emphasize 'performance goals,' leaving them vulnerable to negative feedback and likely to disengage from challenging learning opportunities. In contrast, students who believe intelligence is mallea...
Article
Full-text available
"Like many other Blacks," recounted African American tennis great Arthur Ashe, "when I find myself in a new public situation, I will count" (Ashe, 1993, p. 131). Ashe, who played a sport that was and still is dominated by Whites, counted his "Blackness" frequently. By "counting", Ashe was referring to the difficulty he encountered as a member of a...
Article
Standardized tests continue to generate gender and race gaps in achievement despite decades of national attention. Research on “stereotype threat” (Steele & Aronson, 1995) suggests that these gaps may be partly due to stereotypes that impugn the math abilities of females and the intellectual abilities of Black, Hispanic, and low-income students. A...
Article
African American college students tend to obtain lower grades than their White counterparts, even when they enter college with equivalent test scores. Past research suggests that negative stereotypes impugning Black students' intellectual abilities play a role in this underperformance. Awareness of these stereotypes can psychologically threaten Afr...
Article
Research on “stereotype threat” (Aronson, Quinn, & Spencer, 1998; Steele, 1997; Steele & Aronson, 1995) suggests that the social stigma of intellectual inferiority borne by certain cultural minorities can undermine the standardized test performance and school outcomes of members of these groups. This research tested two assumptions about the necess...
Article
Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of Texas at Austin, 2001. Includes bibliographical references (p. 82-87). Photocopy of typescript.

Projects

Project (1)
Project
To improve the pedagogy of middle school math teachers