Catalin Lazar

Catalin Lazar
University of Bucharest | Unibuc · ArchaeoSciences Division. Research Institute of the University of Bucharest (ICUB)

PhD

About

137
Publications
77,986
Reads
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1,152
Citations
Citations since 2016
62 Research Items
1002 Citations
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
2016201720182019202020212022050100150200
Introduction
Catalin Lazar is a Senior researcher at the University of Bucharest, and Director of the ArchaeoSciences Division at Research Institute of the University of Bucharest (ICUB). His research interests include excavation of Neolithic and Eneolithic sites, experimental archaeology, archaeometry, human-landscape interaction, funerary behaviours, paleodemography and mortuary practices in South-Eastern Europe.
Additional affiliations
October 2018 - present
ICUB
Position
  • Managing Director
October 2017 - present
University of Bucharest
Position
  • Professor (Associate)
Description
  • Introduction in ArchaeoSciences (Second Cycle) Archaeometric and experimental methods used in the study of clay objects (First Cycle)
May 2017 - present
University of Bucharest
Position
  • Research Associate
Education
January 2001 - October 2009
Romanian Academy
Field of study
  • Burial Archaeology / Neolithic Funerary Practices
September 1999 - July 2000
Universitatea Ovidius Constanţa
Field of study
  • Neolithic Archaeology
September 1995 - July 1999
Universitatea Ovidius Constanţa
Field of study
  • Prehistoric Archaeology

Publications

Publications (137)
Article
Full-text available
The ornaments played a significant role in the life of human communities during the Holocene. This paper explores various aspects (with reference to malacology, technology, function, use-wear, art and symbolism) of the perforated shells made of Lithoglyphus naticoides across Europe during prehistory, with a particular focus on the site of Sultana-M...
Chapter
Full-text available
The ornaments made by Spondylus shells play a significant role in evolution and development of human communities from the 5th millennium BC in the Balkans. This paper focuses on the Spondylus ornaments discovered in Southeastern Romania dated to the Eneolithic (c. 5000-3900 cal. BC). These items enabled identification of the same technological elem...
Article
Full-text available
Through time, both natural and cultural heritage have unfortunately been under threat due to multiple environmental and human-induced factors, which are likely to trigger various hazards such as soil erosion, landslides, or land collapse. The analysis of old cartographic material, aerial imagery, and satellite imagery has been used in multiple stud...
Article
Full-text available
Over time archaeologists interested in pottery combustion structures mainly focused on analysing the ability of particular kilns to meet certain pyrotechnological criteria. Thus, their research was based on testing multiple firing techniques for achieving different combustion atmoshperes, recording and examining thermal data (maximum temperatures/h...
Article
By sequencing 727 ancient individuals from the Southern Arc (Anatolia and its neighbors in Southeastern Europe and West Asia) over 10,000 years, we contextualize its Chalcolithic period and Bronze Age (about 5000 to 1000 BCE), when extensive gene flow entangled it with the Eurasian steppe. Two streams of migration transmitted Caucasus and Anatolian...
Preprint
Full-text available
Freshwater mussels shells are common remains in archaeological sites of the Gumelnița culture (5th millennium BC, Romania), and were part of the diet of its ancient inhabitants. The proteins of these shells are often preserved and can be used for paleodietary and paleoecosystem reconstructions by stable isotopes. To obtain the empirical relationshi...
Article
Full-text available
Spatial data play a crucial role in archaeological research, and orthophotos, digital elevation models, and 3D models are frequently used for the mapping, documentation, and monitoring of archaeological sites. Thanks to the availability of compact and low-cost uncrewed airborne vehicles, the use of UAV-based photogrammetry matured in this field ove...
Article
Full-text available
By sequencing 727 ancient individuals from the Southern Arc (Anatolia and its neighbors in Southeastern Europe and West Asia) over 10,000 years, we contextualize its Chalcolithic period and Bronze Age (about 5000 to 1000 BCE), when extensive gene flow entangled it with the Eurasian steppe. Two streams of migration transmitted Caucasus and Anatolian...
Article
Literary and archaeological sources have preserved a rich history of Southern Europe and West Asia since the Bronze Age that can be complemented by genetics. Mycenaean period elites in Greece did not differ from the general population and included both people with some steppe ancestry and others, like the Griffin Warrior, without it. Similarly, peo...
Article
We present the first ancient DNA data from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic of Mesopotamia (Southeastern Turkey and Northern Iraq), Cyprus, and the Northwestern Zagros, along with the first data from Neolithic Armenia. We show that these and neighboring populations were formed through admixture of pre-Neolithic sources related to Anatolian, Caucasus, and...
Article
We present the first ancient DNA data from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic of Mesopotamia (Southeastern Turkey and Northern Iraq), Cyprus, and the Northwestern Zagros, along with the first data from Neolithic Armenia. We show that these and neighboring populations were formed through admixture of pre-Neolithic sources related to Anatolian, Caucasus, and...
Article
Literary and archaeological sources have preserved a rich history of Southern Europe and West Asia since the Bronze Age that can be complemented by genetics. Mycenaean period elites in Greece did not differ from the general population and included both people with some steppe ancestry and others, like the Griffin Warrior, without it. Similarly, peo...
Article
Full-text available
We present the first ancient DNA data from the Pre-Pottery Neolithic of Mesopotamia (Southeastern Turkey and Northern Iraq), Cyprus, and the Northwestern Zagros, along with the first data from Neolithic Armenia. We show that these and neighboring populations were formed through admixture of pre-Neolithic sources related to Anatolian, Caucasus, and...
Article
Full-text available
Literary and archaeological sources have preserved a rich history of Southern Europe and West Asia since the Bronze Age that can be complemented by genetics. Mycenaean period elites in Greece did not differ from the general population and included both people with some steppe ancestry and others, like the Griffin Warrior, without it. Similarly, peo...
Article
Full-text available
The current paper aims to reveal the potential of combining multiple approaches (techno-functional analysis, experimental archaeology, and X-ray Computed Tomography) when it comes to studying unique earthenware artefacts, such as the prehistoric human-shaped pot discovered within the tell settlement from Sultana-Malu Rosu (Romania), that belongs to...
Article
Full-text available
Stable isotopic ratios of carbon and nitrogen performed on collagen and tooth enamel offer invaluable insight into the diet of ancient populations. In the northern Balkans, most of these isotopic data have been collected as auxiliary information of radiocarbon dates, to correct a potential marine reservoir effect. In order to facilitate the access...
Article
Full-text available
The current study aims to present and discuss the results obtained by complementary archaeometric methods applied for the first time on white pigments inlaid on excised pottery of the Boian-Vidra tradition (Early Chalcolithic, c. 4900-4600 BCE). The samples came from three settlements located in Southern Romania (Sultana-Ghețărie, Vidra, and Vlădic...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Investigations of the water in an archaeological context could be connected to natural water supply, hydrological conditions, and socio-cultural developments of human societies in the past is a real challenge for contemporary research. Unfortunately, the past human habitation was perceived as a terrestrial model for many years. Consequently, the ar...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Our session will address new insights concerning the chronology of Copper Age sites between the Black Sea and Central Europe. This vast region is characterised by various environments and historical landscapes, which led to an equally large variety of lifestyles and historical archives. The diversity of archives and different research traditions re...
Book
Full-text available
The funeral rites and rituals of various communities from different timespans are among the most challenging scientific research problems due to the complexity of the phenomenon itself and the so-called "opacity" of archaeological discoveries. In these conditions, such a topic's approach requires special attention, both from structuring the existi...
Article
Full-text available
The tell settlement from “Măgura Gumelnița” is the eponymous site of the Eneolithic civilization with the same name. It is probably the most significant tell settlement north of the Danube, and it belonged to the Kodjadermen ‐ Gumelnița ‐ Karanovo VI cultural complex that occupied the Balkan area in the second half of 5th millennium BC. During 2018...
Article
Full-text available
The development of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and close-range photogrammetry facilitates the fast and accurate micro-topographical mapping and analysis of archaeological sites. Considering these aspects, archaeologists increasingly implement the use of UAVs for mapping known archaeological sites and of course for discovering new areas of intere...
Article
Local production or import? This question always raises vivid debates among the archaeologists when they analyse pots and ceramic fragments regardless of the studied period. In the case of pottery from the Eneolithic tell settlement of Sultana-Malu Roşu from South-East Romania, we tried to address this issue through a series of physico-chemical inv...
Article
Full-text available
In this paper we analyzed a batch of 64 clay weights from three archaeological sites located in Romania (Gumelniţa, Măgura-Jilava, and Sultana) that belong to Kodjadermen-Gumelniţa-Karanovo VI cultural complex (4600-3900 cal. BC). Our approach includes an interdisciplinary investigation based on technological analysis, experimental archaeology , an...
Article
Full-text available
The current paper will explore the women’s burials discovered in the Sultana-Malu Roşu cemetery (c. 5000-4000 cal. BC) from multiple perspectives (e.g., body positions, orientations, grave structures, grave goods and offerings, palaeodemographic data and the spatial location of the graves in the cemetery area). The aim of this integrated approach i...
Chapter
Full-text available
The analysis of the metal artefacts from Sultana-Malu Rosu complete the data available for early metallurgy in the Balkans and it has provided an interesting evidence concerning the individual and collective choices of that human community. Undoubtedly, these pieces reflect a form of symbolic expression of those communities, related to the construc...
Article
Full-text available
This paper reports the use of experimental archaeology and imaging methods—X-ray computed tomography (CT) and radiography—that were employed to decipher the manufacturing techniques of Eneolithic clay artefacts. This study was triggered by the archaeological research conducted in some tell settlements in Southeastern Romania that belong to the Kodj...
Article
Full-text available
European farmers' first strides from the south The early spread of farmers across Europe has previously been thought to be part of a single migration event. David Reich and colleagues analyse genome-wide data from 225 individuals who lived in southeastern Europe and the surrounding regions between 12000 and 500 BC. They analyse this in combination...
Article
Full-text available
The site at Sultana is located on the high terrace of the Mostiștea Lake, Southern Romania, and it belongs to the Eneolithic period (ca. 5000‐3900 cal. BC). The site consists of an Early Eneolithic flat settlement (Boian‐Vidra), a Middle Eneolithic tell settlement (Gumelnița), and a common cemetery used by both communities. The aim of this paper is...
Article
Full-text available
The tell settlement from “Măgura Gumelnița” is the eponymous site of the Eneolithic civilization with the same name. It is probably the biggest tell settlement North of the Danube, and it belonged to the Kodjadermen ‐ Gumelnița ‐ Karanovo VI civilization that occupied in the Balkan area in the second half of 5th millennium BC. In 2017, a complex in...
Article
Full-text available
This article presents a new Eneolithic grave discovered at Orbeasca de Sus (Orbeasca commune, Teleorman County). The conditions of discovery, the inventory, the absolute and relative dating elements, and the results of the anthropological analyses are described. Moreover, the situation of the grave is correlated with the general context of the Neo-...
Article
Full-text available
This paper is about the use of X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) employed to investigate the manufacturing techniques of Eneolithic clay artefacts and pottery. This study was triggered by the archaeological research conducted at some tell settlements in Southeastern Romania that belong to the Kodjadermen – Gumelniţa - Karanovo VI culture (c. 4500-3800...
Chapter
Full-text available
This paper focuses on Eneolithic child burials discovered in the Sultana-Malu Roşu cemetery, southeastern Romania (c. 5000–4000 cal. BC). The associated burial practices may implicitly re ect, through the inclusion of grave goods or other features such as the treatment of the body and the position of the burial within the funerary area, the potenti...
Chapter
Full-text available
he issue of prehistoric anthropomorphic pottery currently represents a challenge for archaeological research from different points of view (e.g. typology, technology, aestheticy, art, function, meaning and symbolism). The burned clay pot associated with the general human shape or only with some anthropomorphic features epresents a special category...
Research
Full-text available
Sultana Open Day (08/08/2017 - 10:00 am) Free access You are wellcome
Article
Full-text available
The transition from hunting and gathering to farming involved profound cultural and technological changes. In Western and Central Europe, these changes occurred rapidly and synchronously after the arrival of early farmers of Anatolian origin [1; 2 ; 3], who largely replaced the local Mesolithic hunter-gatherers [1; 4; 5 ; 6]. Further east, in the B...
Data
Data S1. Dataset of Ancient Samples Used for Population Genetic Analyses, Related to Figures 1, 2, and S3 and STAR Methods
Data
Data S2. Results of the Outgroup f3 Statistics for the Romanian Genomes, Related to Figures 2 and S3 and STAR Methods
Article
Full-text available
The transition from hunting and gathering to farming involved profound cultural and technological changes. In Western and Central Europe, these changes occurred rapidly and synchronously after the arrival of early farmers of Anatolian origin [1, 2, 3], who largely replaced the local Mesolithic hunter-gatherers [1, 4, 5, 6]. Further east, in the Bal...
Article
Full-text available
Farming was first introduced to southeastern Europe in the mid-7th millennium BCE - brought by migrants from Anatolia who settled in the region before spreading throughout Europe. However, the dynamics of the interaction between the first farmers and the indigenous hunter-gatherers remain poorly understood because of the near absence of ancient DNA...
Article
Full-text available
The transition from hunting and gathering to farming involved profound cultural and technological changes. In Western and Central Europe, these changes occurred rapidly and synchronously after the arrival of early farmers of Anatolian origin [1–3], who largely replaced the local Mesolithic hunter-gatherers [1, 4–6]. Further east, in the Baltic regi...
Article
Full-text available
The relationship between people and dogs has its beginnings in the Palaeolithic and extends tocontemporary times. This paper explores the role of dogs in Eneolithic communities from the Balkans, witha particular focus on two dog mandibles which were discovered in House No. 14 at Sultana-Malu Ros ̧u(ca. 4600–3950B.C.) in Romania. The two artifacts b...
Chapter
Full-text available
Most archaeologists agree that funerary practices are directly connected with beliefs in the existence of an afterlife, and that objects placed in graves are sometimes extremely helpful in reconstructing past social systems or other types of identities (economic, cultural, ethnic, racial, etc.). However, this assertion is only partially valid, beca...
Poster
Full-text available
his paper focuses on the Eneolithic children burials discovered in the Sultana-Malu Rosu cemetery, Romania (ca. 5000-4000 cal BC). These burial practices may implicitly reflect, through grave goods or other features (such as body treatment and position within the funerary area), the potential symbolic significance of children and their connection t...
Poster
Full-text available
The latest studies of archaeobotany remains from Sultana-Malu Roșu tell settlement are depicting a community connected with it’s environment. Using native plants from Chenopodium album (Fat Hen) to Lithospermum arvense (Field Gromwell), one can develop an image of life six and a half millennia ago. Sultana-Malu Roșu is a tell settlement from Călăra...
Poster
Full-text available
The Eneolithic necropolis from Sultana - Malu Roșu (Călărași county, Romania) contains 84 graves inhumations graves. Most graves contained individuals deposited in a crouched position on the left side, rarely on the right side, and the oriented eastwardly. However, beyond these findings, a number of graves from this cemetery, containing human bones...
Presentation
Full-text available
In this paper, we will present some observation made on a batch of 267 vessels from the tell settlement of Sultana-Malu Roşu that belong to Kodjadermen-Gumelnita-Karonovo VI cultural complex (ca. 4500-3900 cal.BC) from Balkans. The vessels in question come from more or less complete assemblages of pots from dwelling type features, attributed to two...
Article
Full-text available
This paper presents a synthesis of the Archaeodrom Project in the context of Romanian contemporary experimental archaeology. This project represents an original interdisciplinary approach applied to one of the key periods of Romanian prehistory – the Eneolithic (ca. 5000-3700 B.C.). Due especially to the lack of complementary sources of information...